The Lanier Briefcase by Nock Co. is Now Available

the-lanier-briefcase-by-nock-co-kickstarter

When I last wrote about Nock Co.’s Lanier briefcase last September (2016), it was still just a Kickstarter project, albeit one that got funded within the first day.

Here’s what I said:

They were nice enough to send me a Lanier prototype for testing prior to the project launch, and I’ve gotta say, I love the build quality of this thing. It simply feels great to hold and use, right down to the zippers (which are of the YKK variety, by the way). The main compartment has more than enough room for my iPad, keyboard, and Confidant; the front zipper pocket is where my charger goes; and the removable pouch is perfect for the memo books, earbuds, and writing utensils.

And now, the Lanier is available for direct purchase at Nock Co.’s site for $98. The Black/Aqua prototype they sent me is still something I use almost every day (basically whenever my wife and I need to do work away from the RV). It fits everything I listed in that first post plus my wife’s iPad 4 + keyboard case and our son’s Amazon Kindle Fire Kid’s Edition (you know, the one with the thick blue shell). It’s a tight fit with all that stuff but it works.

After nine months traveling around the country with this thing, I can definitely attest to its quality and durability. My only quibble is that I wish there were a way to attach a shoulder strap, but even that’s not too big a deal. Get one for yourself and thank me later.

Buy Now

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Torba EZ_Duffle Bag [Kickstarter]

Torba EZ_Duffle Bag [Kickstarter]

If you love large, modular travel bags, the EZ_Duffle by Torba is a Kickstarter project that should pique your interest.

Clocking in at 20″ x 9″ x 11.5″, this duffel (which is how I prefer to spell it) is a versatile, modular bag that aims to keep you organized so you can grab what you need, when you need it. It’s loaded with 22 pockets, compartments, loops, and straps that can be reconfigured in a variety of ways depending on what you need to pack inside. When the bag’s empty, it twists and folds down (origami-style) into a compact form for easy storage between trips.

Watch the demo video to get a feel for what the bag can do:

VIDEO

The main portion of the EZ_Duffle can exist as one enormous compartment, or you can use one or two interior dividers to create three compartments — a medium-sized one in the middle and a smaller one on each end. There are also a couple of detachable modules that fit into those two smaller end pockets if you need them:

  1. Electronics module — Equipped with a dedicated smartphone pocket, a padded tablet compartment, a documents pocket, two mesh pockets for all your small items, and pen loops.
  2. Flexi-dividers module — Allows for either vertical or horizontal stacking of bottles, lunch boxes, accessories, garments, etc.

torba-ez_duffle-bag-kickstarter-2

A vented laundry compartment on the back of the bag gives you a great place to store dirty clothes, while the spillproof pocket on the inside of the main flap is great for toiletries. The multipurpose interior strap can be used to keep items like garments, shoes or your laptop securely in place.

As of this writing (June 24th, 2017) there’s about a week left before the Kickstarter project is officially funded, and they’ve already more than tripled their funding goal. They’ve still got some early-bird reward slots available too, so you can back the project at the ~$155 (USD) level or higher to get an EZ_Duffle of your own.

Back Project

You May Also Like

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Torba EZ_Duffle Bag [Kickstarter]

Torba EZ_Duffle Bag [Kickstarter]

If you love large, modular travel bags, the EZ_Duffle by Torba is a Kickstarter project that should pique your interest.

Clocking in at 20″ x 9″ x 11.5″, this duffel (which is how I prefer to spell it) is a versatile, modular bag that aims to keep you organized so you can grab what you need, when you need it. It’s loaded with 22 pockets, compartments, loops, and straps that can be reconfigured in a variety of ways depending on what you need to pack inside. When the bag’s empty, it twists and folds down (origami-style) into a compact form for easy storage between trips.

Watch the demo video to get a feel for what the bag can do:

VIDEO

The main portion of the EZ_Duffle can exist as one enormous compartment, or you can use one or two interior dividers to create three compartments — a medium-sized one in the middle and a smaller one on each end. There are also a couple of detachable modules that fit into those two smaller end pockets if you need them:

  1. Electronics module — Equipped with a dedicated smartphone pocket, a padded tablet compartment, a documents pocket, two mesh pockets for all your small items, and pen loops.
  2. Flexi-dividers module — Allows for either vertical or horizontal stacking of bottles, lunch boxes, accessories, garments, etc.

torba-ez_duffle-bag-kickstarter-2

A vented laundry compartment on the back of the bag gives you a great place to store dirty clothes, while the spillproof pocket on the inside of the main flap is great for toiletries. The multipurpose interior strap can be used to keep items like garments, shoes or your laptop securely in place.

As of this writing (June 24th, 2017) there’s about a week left before the Kickstarter project is officially funded, and they’ve already more than tripled their funding goal. They’ve still got some early-bird reward slots available too, so you can back the project at the ~$155 (USD) level or higher to get an EZ_Duffle of your own.

Back Project

You May Also Like

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Torba EZ_Duffle Bag [Kickstarter]

Torba EZ_Duffle Bag [Kickstarter]

If you love large, modular travel bags, the EZ_Duffle by Torba is a Kickstarter project that should pique your interest.

Clocking in at 20″ x 9″ x 11.5″, this duffel (which is how I prefer to spell it) is a versatile, modular bag that aims to keep you organized so you can grab what you need, when you need it. It’s loaded with 22 pockets, compartments, loops, and straps that can be reconfigured in a variety of ways depending on what you need to pack inside. When the bag’s empty, it twists and folds down (origami-style) into a compact form for easy storage between trips.

Watch the demo video to get a feel for what the bag can do:

VIDEO

The main portion of the EZ_Duffle can exist as one enormous compartment, or you can use one or two interior dividers to create three compartments — a medium-sized one in the middle and a smaller one on each end. There are also a couple of detachable modules that fit into those two smaller end pockets if you need them:

  1. Electronics module — Equipped with a dedicated smartphone pocket, a padded tablet compartment, a documents pocket, two mesh pockets for all your small items, and pen loops.
  2. Flexi-dividers module — Allows for either vertical or horizontal stacking of bottles, lunch boxes, accessories, garments, etc.

torba-ez_duffle-bag-kickstarter-2

A vented laundry compartment on the back of the bag gives you a great place to store dirty clothes, while the spillproof pocket on the inside of the main flap is great for toiletries. The multipurpose interior strap can be used to keep items like garments, shoes or your laptop securely in place.

As of this writing (June 24th, 2017) there’s about a week left before the Kickstarter project is officially funded, and they’ve already more than tripled their funding goal. They’ve still got some early-bird reward slots available too, so you can back the project at the ~$155 (USD) level or higher to get an EZ_Duffle of your own.

Back Project

You May Also Like

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

The EONE Bradley Watch

the-eone-bradley-watch

The EONE Bradley is a handsome timepiece that can be read by either sight or touch, making it nice for when you need to check the time discreetly — during meetings, at the movies, under the dinner table while suffering through boring conversations, etc — but it’s especially awesome for those with impaired vision. It’s named for Brad Snyder, a former US naval officer who lost his vision to an IED explosion while serving as a bomb diffuser in Afghanistan and persevered to become a Paralympic gold medalist.

The way you use it to tell time with touch alone is by feeling its raised markers and the two magnetized ball bearings that travel around the watch face in separate, recessed tracks — one for the minute and one for the hour. If you accidentally knock either ball bearing out of its magnetic field, a simple flick of the wrist swirls them back into place. Takes a bit of practice to get the hang of it, but once you do, you’ll appreciate the ingenious, understated design.

They have a number of designs available on Amazon, my favorite being the Voyager silver ($325), which also comes in a cobalt version if you shop from Eone’s site directly.

Buy Now

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

The EONE Bradley Watch

the-eone-bradley-watch

The EONE Bradley is a handsome timepiece that can be read by either sight or touch, making it nice for when you need to check the time discreetly — during meetings, at the movies, under the dinner table while suffering through boring conversations, etc — but it’s especially awesome for those with impaired vision. It’s named for Brad Snyder, a former US naval officer who lost his vision to an IED explosion while serving as a bomb diffuser in Afghanistan and persevered to become a Paralympic gold medalist.

The way you use it to tell time with touch alone is by feeling its raised markers and the two magnetized ball bearings that travel around the watch face in separate, recessed tracks — one for the minute and one for the hour. If you accidentally knock either ball bearing out of its magnetic field, a simple flick of the wrist swirls them back into place. Takes a bit of practice to get the hang of it, but once you do, you’ll appreciate the ingenious, understated design.

They have a number of designs available on Amazon, my favorite being the Voyager silver ($325), which also comes in a cobalt version if you shop from Eone’s site directly.

Buy Now

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Quality Linkage: Fictional Languages, Fear-Setting, and the ABCs of Typographic Terminology

quality-linkage-june-23rd-2017-hero-daily-overview

Welcome to this week’s edition of our Friday Quality Linkage column. Please enjoy this week’s collection of interesting and entertaining links. Brew a fresh cup of coffee, find a comfortable place, and relax.

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quality-linkage-j-kenji-lopez-alt-wursthall

J. Kenji López-Alt is Opening a Restaurant in the Bay Area »

Longtime readers of this column, you had to know I was going to link this one: Our favorite food scientist, J. Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats, is planning to open a real-life German/Austrian-style beer and sausage hall called Wursthall in San Mateo, California.

Ellen Fort of Eater has the scoop:

“We don’t want it to be a place to go to Instagram and leave, we want it to be a neighborhood hangout,” said López-Alt. “Lots of younger ppl are moving there who are pushed out of more expensive places further North and South. We want to be on the forefront of modern San Mateo, and make it a good neighborhood spot.”

Not a lot of details about the place just yet, but you can follow @wursthall on Twitter and/or Instagram for updates. I know I will.

+ Related reading: J. Kenji was recently profiled by Epicurious as part of their list of the 100 greatest home cooks of all time:

Even when he’s not moving, he’s moving, fiddling with a stray iPhone adapter plug as he is asked to consider his uncanny ability for getting people to care about the science of their food. “People need something they’re familiar with, something to latch onto and pique their interest and maintain it. And if you jump straight into science, nobody’s going to care,” López-Alt says. He jiggles the iPhone adapter. “But if it’s the science of mashed potatoes, then people do care.”


Typographic Terminology A to Z »

This 3-minute video by The Futur is an excellent guide to typography terms every designer should know, presented in the Mrs Eaves typeface.


Illustration: Nikhil Sonnad, Quartz

Illustration: Nikhil Sonnad, Quartz

The Way You Draw Circles Says a Lot About You »

Thu-Huong Ha and Nikhil Sonnad of Quartz share some interesting psychology behind why people of various countries tend to draw circles the way they do (clockwise or counter-clockwise, respectively):

Together these studies show not only that culture and handwriting shape the way people draws abstract shapes; they also suggest our tendencies get stronger over time. The more we write, the more our habits become ingrained. […] There are countless ways that we subtly, unconsciously carry our cultures with us: the way we draw, count on our fingers, and imitate real-world sounds, to name a few. That’s the delight at the heart of this massive dataset.


Accent Expert Breaks Down 6 Fictional Languages From Film & TV »

Remember that video I linked in November where dialect coach Erik Singer analyzed the accents of 32 Hollywood actors? Well, Wired brought him back to do another video, but this time he examines six fictional languages from film and TV — or as he calls them, “constructed languages” (“conlangs” for short):

  1. Sindarin (Elvish language) from Lord of the Rings
  2. Na’vi from James Cameron’s Avatar — (Side note: If you ever get the chance, you’ve got to check out the new Pandora land in Disney World’s Animal Kingdom, particularly the two big rides, “Flight of Passage” and “Na’vi River Journey”)
  3. tlhIngan Hol (Klingon language) from Star Trek
  4. Parseltongue (snake language) from Harry Potter
  5. Dothraki from Game of Thrones
  6. High Valyrian, also from Game of Thrones

As bonuses, he also goes into languages like Ewokese, Shyriiwook, Mork Speak, Groot Speak, Furbish, and more.


Photo: Max Pixel

Photo: Max Pixel

City Trees Suffer from Not Getting Enough Sleep »

Melissa Breyer of TreeHugger shares some interesting findings by German forester Peter Wohlleben — author of the best-selling book, The Hidden Life of Trees — about the effects of streetlights on trees at night:

Urban trees, like much of the natural world, have a hard time when the lights are left on all night.

“They also have to sleep at night,” Peter Wohlleben told the audience at the Hay Festival of Literature in Wales. “Research shows that trees near street lights die earlier. Like burning a lamp in your bedroom at night, it is not good for you.”


Why You Should Define Your Fears Instead of Your Goals »

Back in April, Tim Ferriss gave a vulnerable TED talk about using the tenets of stoicism to overcome fear and self-paralysis to take action, especially when it comes to the harder choices in our lives:

I can trace all of my biggest wins and all of my biggest disasters averted back to doing fear-setting at least once a quarter.

It’s not a panacea. You’ll find that some of your fears are very well-founded. But you shouldn’t conclude that without first putting them under a microscope. And it doesn’t make all the hard times, the hard choices, easy, but it can make a lot of them easier.

A great reminder that most of the battle is in our own heads.

* * *

Got any suggestions for articles, videos, stories, photographs, and any other links you think we should be posting in our weekly Quality Linkage? Please do let us know on Twitter.

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

A Visit to The Ringling, Part 1: John and Mable Museum of Art

a-visit-to-the-ringling-museum-hero-chris-gonzales

As a family of three who A) lives in an RV full-time and B) owns annual passes to Walt Disney World, the majority of our time in Florida is spent staying in Orlando-area camprounds. Occasionally though, we will take a break from the most magical place on earth to see what other adventures Florida has to offer.

Last week, our wanderings brought us to the Ringling Museum.

I don’t honestly know how much brand recognition the name “Ringling” has outside the US, but at least here in the States, before Cirque de Soleil became a household name around the world, the (now-defunct) Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus was for many years the circus to see. They didn’t call it “The Greatest Show on Earth” for nothing.

I have fond childhood memories of oversized clowns getting out of ridiculously tiny cars, of elephants doing tricks, and the death-defying stunts of trapeze artists. Whenever I visit my parents’ house, there’s an old Ringling circus cup with an elephant trunk handle that I still drink out of to this day. It left a deep impression on me.

However, I never knew all that much about the most famous of the Ringling brothers, John Ringling, so it came as something of a surprise when I discovered he and his wife Mable (who was an avid art collector) founded the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, now known simply as “The Ringling”. The only reason I even found out about this place was because we had parked our RV about an hour away from the Sarasota, FL area and needed something to do other than sit in a campground all day.

As it turns out, this place is actually the official state art museum for Florida and is quite incredible. All the basic facts you’d want to know about it are on its Wikipedia page:

The institution offers twenty-one galleries of European paintings as well as Cypriot antiquities and Asian, American, and contemporary art. The museum’s art collection currently consists of more than 10,000 objects that include a variety of paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, photographs, and decorative arts from ancient through contemporary periods and from around the world.

What the wiki fails to articulate, however, is how grand the museum is. I don’t just mean the size of the place — though it is quite enormous, to the point of being just about impossible to see all of in one day — but also how well-kept and tasteful everything is. I don’t profess to be an art historian by any stretch of the imagination, but even I can see that the breadth of artwork amassed here is quite impressive.

My favorite things to view in the museum were all the Rennaissance-era European paintings, which were numerous, to say the least. They also had quite a few Asian antiquities — including calligraphy scrolls and ancient dining implements — which were impressive in their own right but didn’t capture my imagination in quite the same way.

One thing that surprised me was how many of the paintings contained dark subject matter, which oddly enough were the ones my 5-year-old son had the most interest in, though a few made him so uncomfortable in their depiction of violence that we had to move to the next room.

Anyway, like I said earlier, the museum is very large and we didn’t have quite enough time in one day to explore everything we wanted to, including Cà d’Zan, the mansion John and Mable lived in long ago. The slideshow above features some of my favorite photos I took in the art museum, using only my iPhone 6.

In part two of this photo essay, I’ll share the photos I got from another section of the museum dedicated to circus history.

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Economist Espresso

Image

Following a 24/7 news cycle can be exhausting. Between all the crazy things happening nationally and globally, I find it hard to keep up. Economist Espresso is a nice solution to this problem. You get six articles a day (six days a week) that are aimed at keeping you up to date without overloading you.

It’s only $2.99 per month, and it includes a free trial. You can download it for free on The App Store.

Download Now

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Exchange — The New Typeface by Frere-Jones Type

Two days ago, Frere-Jones Type debuted their newest typeface, Exchange. They describe it as “earnest and forceful, compact but not crowded.”

Well, I say debuted, but really it’s more like revisited and expanded. Originally designed by Tobias Frere-Jones for the Wall Street Journal in the early-2000s, this typeface was commissioned at a time when newspaper pages were getting narrower and the printed word needed more than ever to be readable at small sizes. Designers today face that same issue with websites and mobile/smartwatch apps, making Exchange as relevant now as it was over a decade ago.

In a blog post, Frere-Jones shares the rationale and historical research behind the making of Exchange:

Exchange has a third teacher, its lesson applied much closer to the surface. For all the sneaky planning about optics and presswork, this still had to feel like the news. Above everything else, newspapers want — need — to feel credible. Politically left, right or center, a newspaper should speak in a trustworthy voice.

[…]

All of these lessons — sought out, extracted, recombined, revised, tested on the Journal’s presses, revised again — became Exchange, named for New York’s stock exchanges.

With the public release of Exchange, they’ve expanded the range of weights and overhauled everything for modern standards. The complete Exchange family includes 18 fonts — 10 standard styles and 8 MicroPlus styles. (The two styles can be directly compared on page 28 of this PDF.)

Exchange is available for purchase at Frere-Jones Type, with prices varying depending on the magnitude of the license you need. For frame of reference, the full family is $375 for desktop (1–3 computers) and web (0–50k monthly views), while a full-family license for one app is $1,500. However, you can also purchase styles individually.

Source: http://toolsandtoys.net