How Mindfulness Helps You Get Unstuck

Has someone ever sent you an angry email, and then you found yourself, weeks later, thinking about it while you’re wide awake at 2am?

Emotions can be a major source of distraction, according to researchers Richard Davidson and Daniel Goleman, who have chronicled what we know thus far about the meditator’s mind in a new book, Altered Traits, Science Reveals How Meditation Changes Your Mind, Brain, and Body.

In this whiteboard session for Harvard Business Review, Davidson and Goleman talk about one of the most important discoveries: repeated practice helps us untether from emotional cues that keep us mired in distraction — specifically, rumination.

More emotional control

Research suggests mindfulness practice can strengthen the connections between the brain that direct our decision-making and impulses, so that when we encounter a strong emotional trigger, we’re not pulled to immediately react.

“[Mindfulness]  strengthens the prefrontal (cortex)’s ability to say no to emotional impulse,” says Goleman. This increases resilience because it helps us hold things more lightly —  like that snarky email — and not devote all of our attention to emotional cues. Davidson explains:

The “recover more quickly” is really an important attribute of what we think of as resilience. Resilience is, in many ways, the ability to recover more quickly from adversity. So instead of ruminating about the email that ticked you off for several weeks after, you can come back down and recover.

Goleman cautions that the science of mindfulness — what we know, what we don’t — is still in the early stages of study. There are benefits, but there is a lot of hype as well. Since the early 2000s, research on mindfulness has been expanding rapidly. Here’s a look at 10 leaders in the field, what their research has shown us, and the future directions their studies are taking.

 

Video from HBR.org

 

Meditators Under the Microscope

Why Emotional Self-Control Matters

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Source: https://www.mindful.org

Tame Bad Habits with This 10-Minute Mindfulness Practice

This guided meditation was recorded live at the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

  • First, find a comfortable position. We can begin just by settling into a comfortable posture, whatever that posture is for us right now.
  • Now, tune into body sensations. Check in with your body. What does your body feel in this moment — are you holding tension in any places? Perhaps checking in with the feet and other touch points: the knees, the hips, our hands, our shoulders. Even this breath, breathing itself. Just being really curious: What’s alive for us right now in our bodies.
  • Name the cravings in your mind. For the next few minutes we’ll play with working with cravings. Once we’re settled and anchored in this body, just bring to mind something that really gets our juices flowing, whether it’s a food or something else we really like. We’re also bringing to mind those itches that we feel like we have to scratch. Many of us that are in “Inbox Zero,” which is this constant race to keep our inboxes and our e-mail accounts as small as possible. We can bring this to mind: What does it feel like? When I opened up my computer and I have 58 new e-mails in the last hour. So whether it’s something pleasant, or whether it’s something unpleasant that we feel like we have to deal with, just bringing that situation to mind. Really checking in to see what this urge to do something feels like in our body; this urge to hold onto the pleasant or the urge to make the unpleasant go away.
  • Now, notice how the craving shows up in your body. As we identify where it is in the body, we can dial up the curiosity. What does it feel like? Perhaps even naming to ourselves the physical sensations that are most predominant. We can even explore how this feeling shifts and changes as we bring this curious awareness to it. We can even dial up the curiosity a little bit more. If we had to pick is it more on the right side or the left side of our body? Is it more in the front or the back of our body? And what happens simply by curiously exploring where it is? How long does this sensation last? Is one sensation replaced by another that becomes more predominant? And if we notice that the sensation is fading away that was brought up by imagining that food or the e-mail inbox.
  • Notice what it feels like now just to rest in awareness in the body. Notice what it feels like to know that we can become aware of these sensations — That we don’t have to be slaves to our cravings, we can explore them with curiosity, moment to moment.
  • Finally, explore any other urges or cravings that surface. For the next few minutes. Simply resting in awareness of our bodies. Being on the lookout for these urges: Urges to get lost in fantasies or those urges to beat ourselves up over something that might have happened earlier in the day or in the week. Just diving right in. Exploring. Holding each sensation with this kind, curious awareness.

 

This guided meditation provides additional information to a feature article titled “Constant Craving” which appeared in the April 2018 issue of Mindful magazine.

 

A Simple Way to Break a Bad Habit

5 Ways to Kick Bad Habits

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Source: https://www.mindful.org

UMass Medical School Creates First Division of Mindfulness

Marking unprecedented support for the role of mindfulness in health care, the University of Massachusetts Medical School announced in December the creation of a new division dedicated to its academic study. The Division of Mindfulness, the first of its kind, encompasses the university’s existing Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn in the 1980s. Within a medical school, a “division” indicates that an area, such as endocrinology or psychiatry, is designated as something requiring long-term focused study in order to develop increasingly more effective treatments.

By creating “the infrastructure to support researchers and clinicians to further the scientific knowledge of mindfulness and of how the mind works,” this new designation greatly increases the opportunities for research (as well as sources of funding for such research) and in supporting the application of mindfulness in the health fields and beyond, explains new division chief Judson Brewer, MD, PhD, an associate professor of medicine at the school and director of research at the center.

Likening the development to when “a teenager comes of age and leaves the house,” Brewer explained that the decision to establish an entire medical division dedicated to mindfulness is in many ways the natural next step for an area that’s grown exponentially over the past four decades. “This really highlights how far the field has progressed and matured,” he said.

Remarking that the notion of a medical school division dedicated to studying the impact of meditation was “virtually inconceivable” when he and others began doing this work, Kabat-Zinn was clearly pleased. “That this has come about is diagnostic of a new and increasingly widespread recognition of the deep potential synergies between the domains of medicine and meditation…as well as recognition of the challenges involved in maintaining and optimizing human well-being and health across the lifespan.

“We are now understanding the seamless interconnectedness of brain, mind, body, experience, and well-being,” he added. This show of support for furthering the inquiry “has the potential to inform the development of increasingly effective targeted clinical programs under the umbrella of a far more participatory model of medicine and health care.”

For Brewer and his team—which will be expanding thanks to increased funding designed to attract the best researchers and clinicians in the field—the possibilities are exciting.

On the neuroscience front, Brewer said, they will work to refine and confirm “hypotheses on the mechanisms of action”—in other words, actually testing targeted scientific theories of how and why mindfulness works in specific ways and in specific instances—instead of the more exploratory models commonly employed now.

In the clinical realm, he anticipates increasing the number of “efficacy studies that refine treatment and training” in mindfulness interventions, such as Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction.

And he says he’s particularly excited about the development of “novel treatments,” including digital therapeutics, which is already a focus in his lab, as well as opportunities for greater collaboration.

When asked whether this change raises the bar to “prove” the benefits of mindfulness, Brewer said it’s important for the division to be the “standard-bearer on not overhyping” what mindfulness can—and what it can’t—do: “There’s plenty that’s true! It doesn’t help anyone to overhype anything.”

 

 

This article appeared in the April 2018 issue of Mindful magazine.

 

 

A Major Turning Point for Mindfulness in Health Care

10 Mindfulness Researchers You Should Know

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Source: https://www.mindful.org

A Major Turning Point for Mindfulness in Health Care

When I started at the UMass Medical Center in 1976, the idea that one day there would be a Division of Mindfulness within the Department of Medicine was virtually inconceivable. That it has come about is diagnostic of a new and increasingly widespread recognition of the deep potential synergies between the domains of medicine and meditation (the words themselves are obviously linked at the etymological hip) as well as recognition of the challenges involved in maintaining and optimizing human well-being and health across the lifespan.

When I started at the UMass Medical Center in 1976, the idea that one day there would be a Division of Mindfulness within the Department of Medicine was virtually inconceivable.

Thanks to the rapidly growing science of mindfulness, we are now understanding the seamless interconnectedness of brain, mind, body, experience, and well-being — to say nothing of the contributions to health and well-being that stem from social interconnectedness and environmental/planetary concerns. Our scientific understanding of mindfulness has the potential to inform the development of increasingly effective and targeted clinical programs under the umbrella of a far more participatory model of medicine and health care, in which our patients learn to engage in mindfulness practices shown to beneficially affect health and well-being as a complement to their medical treatments. In that sense, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) can be seen as a public health intervention, designed to over time move the bell curve of society as a whole toward greater health.  Jud Brewer and the Department of Medicine are to be congratulated for bringing things to this pioneering new threshold.  The new Division of Mindfulness will reaffirm UMass’s leadership position in this cutting edge field and will serve as an effective launching platform for the next generation of research and clinical developments at the institution where mindfulness in medicine began.

 

Jon Kabat-Zinn
Professor of Medicine emeritus
UMass Medical School

Founder, MBSR and the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society

 

This statement provides additional information to a feature article titled, “The Medicine of the Moment” in the April 2018 issue of Mindful magazine.

 

UMass Medical School Creates First Division of Mindfulness

No Blueprint, Just Love

The post A Major Turning Point for Mindfulness in Health Care appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org

A Major Turning Point for Mindfulness in Health Care

When I started at the UMass Medical Center in 1976, the idea that one day there would be a Division of Mindfulness within the Department of Medicine was virtually inconceivable. That it has come about is diagnostic of a new and increasingly widespread recognition of the deep potential synergies between the domains of medicine and meditation (the words themselves are obviously linked at the etymological hip) as well as recognition of the challenges involved in maintaining and optimizing human well-being and health across the lifespan.

When I started at the UMass Medical Center in 1976, the idea that one day there would be a Division of Mindfulness within the Department of Medicine was virtually inconceivable.

Thanks to the rapidly growing science of mindfulness, we are now understanding the seamless interconnectedness of brain, mind, body, experience, and well-being — to say nothing of the contributions to health and well-being that stem from social interconnectedness and environmental/planetary concerns. Our scientific understanding of mindfulness has the potential to inform the development of increasingly effective and targeted clinical programs under the umbrella of a far more participatory model of medicine and health care, in which our patients learn to engage in mindfulness practices shown to beneficially affect health and well-being as a complement to their medical treatments. In that sense, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) can be seen as a public health intervention, designed to over time move the bell curve of society as a whole toward greater health.  Jud Brewer and the Department of Medicine are to be congratulated for bringing things to this pioneering new threshold.  The new Division of Mindfulness will reaffirm UMass’s leadership position in this cutting edge field and will serve as an effective launching platform for the next generation of research and clinical developments at the institution where mindfulness in medicine began.

 

Jon Kabat-Zinn
Professor of Medicine emeritus
UMass Medical School

Founder, MBSR and the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society

 

This statement provides additional information to a feature article titled, “The Medicine of the Moment” in the April 2018 issue of Mindful magazine.

 

UMass Medical School Creates First Division of Mindfulness

No Blueprint, Just Love

The post A Major Turning Point for Mindfulness in Health Care appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org

Administrative Assistant

Mindful
Administrative Assistant
Halifax, Nova Scotia

Do you pride yourself on being on top of things? Prepared? Would you self-describe as an office ninja? Mindful magazine is looking for a cracker-jack organizer and people-person who can manage office resources, provide support, and be the administrative glue that holds it all together. The ideal Administrative Assistant must have a jump-in-and-get-it-done attitude, be technically savvy, demonstrate exceptional customer service, and see it as a point of pride to meet the many and diverse needs of a busy office environment. An affinity for the mission of giving the world the mindful tools it needs to make it a better place wouldn’t hurt either.  

Who we are:

Mindful is an independent nonprofit media company located in Halifax dedicated to inspiring, guiding and connecting anyone who wants to explore mindfulness—to enjoy better health, more caring relationships, and a more compassionate society. Check out our website at mindful.org.

What you’ll be doing:

Administrative:

  • Office Management: attending to the flow of people, physical resources, space, and needs.
  • Administration: providing staff support and performing ongoing business-related functions.
  • Research: building and tracking quizzes and surveys in Survey Monkey and MailChimp
  • Email: managing permissions and brokering and responding to industry and other inquiries.

Editorial:

  • Support business and post-issue production needs of editorial and art departments: payables, review copy requests, publisher relations, preparing PDFs for distribution and digital publication.

What you need to have:

  • Experience in office environment.
  • Proficiency with office technology including MAC and PC operating systems and applications and the Microsoft suite of applications.
  • Comfort with and/or willingness to learn back-end of relevant web applications and creating PDFs with Adobe InDesign.
  • Aptitude and enthusiasm for providing support.
  • Ability to manage time and demands and prioritize.

Additional Information:

This full time permanent position is located in Halifax.  The salary will take experience into account.  All benefits – health, dental, and vision – are employer-paid, and the work week is 35 hours. The office itself is architect-designed and located in the city’s vibrant north end. Candidates must be eligible to work in Canada.  

To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to cindy@mindful.org and include “Administrative Assistant” in the subject line. Deadline: March 2, 2018.   

The post Administrative Assistant appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org

Administrative Assistant

Mindful
Administrative Assistant
Halifax, Nova Scotia

Do you pride yourself on being on top of things? Prepared? Would you self-describe as an office ninja? Mindful magazine is looking for a cracker-jack organizer and people-person who can manage office resources, provide support, and be the administrative glue that holds it all together. The ideal Administrative Assistant must have a jump-in-and-get-it-done attitude, be technically savvy, demonstrate exceptional customer service, and see it as a point of pride to meet the many and diverse needs of a busy office environment. An affinity for the mission of giving the world the mindful tools it needs to make it a better place wouldn’t hurt either.  

Who we are:

Mindful is an independent nonprofit media company located in Halifax dedicated to inspiring, guiding and connecting anyone who wants to explore mindfulness—to enjoy better health, more caring relationships, and a more compassionate society. Check out our website at mindful.org.

What you’ll be doing:

Administrative:

  • Office Management: attending to the flow of people, physical resources, space, and needs.
  • Administration: providing staff support and performing ongoing business-related functions.
  • Research: building and tracking quizzes and surveys in Survey Monkey and MailChimp
  • Email: managing permissions and brokering and responding to industry and other inquiries.

Editorial:

  • Support business and post-issue production needs of editorial and art departments: payables, review copy requests, publisher relations, preparing PDFs for distribution and digital publication.

What you need to have:

  • Experience in office environment.
  • Proficiency with office technology including MAC and PC operating systems and applications and the Microsoft suite of applications.
  • Comfort with and/or willingness to learn back-end of relevant web applications and creating PDFs with Adobe InDesign.
  • Aptitude and enthusiasm for providing support.
  • Ability to manage time and demands and prioritize.

Additional Information:

This full time permanent position is located in Halifax.  The salary will take experience into account.  All benefits – health, dental, and vision – are employer-paid, and the work week is 35 hours. The office itself is architect-designed and located in the city’s vibrant north end. Candidates must be eligible to work in Canada.  

To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to cindy@mindful.org and include “Administrative Assistant” in the subject line. Deadline: March 2, 2018.   

The post Administrative Assistant appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org

Are You a Micromanager? How to Be Mindful of Being Counterproductive

The French playwright, Charles-Guillaume Étienne, once wrote: On n’est jamais servi si bien que par soi-même.” Roughly translated as, “one is never served so well as by oneself.” This phrase is popular with micromanagers everywhere, but it’s often incorrectly translated as, “if you want something done right, do it yourself.”

Etienne’s original statement was the more precise one. When you take over a project and begin to micromanage, you are only serving yourself. Studies have shown that micromanaging is counterproductive. It decimates team morale by breeding a culture of distrust. It also leads to team members creating roadblocks for fear of making a wrong move.

Studies have shown that micromanaging is counterproductive. It decimates team morale by breeding a culture of distrust.

Sometimes, though, we aren’t aware that we’ve gone down the prickly path of micromanagement. Anxiety, stress, fatigue, and other emotions can cloud our better leadership judgement. It helps to take a step back and look for the telltale signs that you have become a micromanager.

Signs that you’re a micromanager

There are many ways that you can micromanage someone without realizing it, but here are some of the more obvious signs that you need to take a few steps back:

  • You ask for materials repeatedly prior to a project’s deadline
  • You take team members off of certain tasks for fear they won’t complete them
  • You jump on calls that you don’t need to be on
  • You send email replies before your team can reply

If you recognize any of these work moves, you might be a micromanager. But help is just a few short breaths away. Mindfulness can help you sort and sift through habits that might be getting in the way of your team’s productivity.

Explore (and break free from) your micromanaging habit in 5 steps

  1. First, be aware that you are doing it. Whenever you decide to write an email, grab a phone call, or not delegate a project, ask yourself why you are doing these things and write it down. What are you feeling physically? Are you afraid? Why?
  2. Then, think twice. Do you want to send that email, grab that call, or hoard a project. Can someone else do it? Isn’t this the reason why you are the team leader — so you can bring out the best of people around you rather than frustrate them and thwart their work?
  3. Next, try letting go. Let your team members handle projects after you have delegated. Set deadlines so you can keep track, but don’t feel the need to jump into every detail. The nerves that come with letting someone else handle important projects are real — and worth noting — but you’d be surprised at what your capable team can do. In a recent case study that took place in a long-term care facility, researchers found that micromanaged teams often felt demoralized, less motivated, and less productive. On the flip side, teams that were guided (with clear goals) but not micromanaged felt a stronger sense of accomplishment and were more productive.
  4. Explore anxiety. When you start to feel anxious, let those thoughts come and go — just as you would with meditation — but don’t act on them. Take note, allow yourself to feel where the anxiety is located in your body without getting pulled in by associated anxious thoughts or feelings. You can do that by noting when those thoughts are present (e.g. noting when the tension in your shoulders appears after frustrations felt towards a colleague). Refresh your intentions toward your own work for the day.
  5. Reflect on this experiment. Check in with yourself after one month of being more mindful of micromanaging. Has your team’s morale gone up? Are employee engagement rates rising? Are things getting done at a smoother and swifter rate?

The upside to letting go (a little bit): Empowering your team

Micromanaging brings with it a slew of negativity. A lack of team morale, the inability to learn new things or think creatively, lack of trust and team respect, crushing problem solving skills, and a high employee turnover rate are some of the main reasons why micromanaging is a bad leadership strategy.

Micromanaging brings with it a slew of negativity.

On the flip side, learning to let go results in boosted team morale, increased creative flow, stronger trust and camaraderie between team members, a less stressful or toxic environment, and a broader sense of purpose. While letting go of projects and trusting your team might be anxiety-provoking, being mindful of your management style can prevent good team members from turning and running in the opposite direction.

 

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The post Are You a Micromanager? How to Be Mindful of Being Counterproductive appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org

A 5-Minute Gratitude Practice: Focus on the Good by Tapping into Your Senses

Waking up this morning, I glanced at my cell phone and noticed the weather app ominously predicting many days of snow and icy temperatures ahead. Brrr! I could feel the chill of dark thoughts starting to gather. I could feel my body creak with cold and aging.

Life’s challenges were seemingly everywhere. And yet…I was smiling. I was cheerful. I was grateful. What? Was I crazy?

As one of my New Year’s resolutions, I’d made a point of tuning my awareness toward appreciation of life’s small delights. I was curious about what I would discover if I focused intentionally on the things that I appreciated. This morning, as I let wakefulness peel the dark back, I could smell my neighbor’s coffee brewing. The snow outside gently buffered the sounds of the world. I could sense my husband’s warm weight in the bed. I took a long moment to enjoy the muted winter light edging in around the slats of the window blinds.

There was nothing particularly special going on, but I noticed that being grateful for little things was already lifting my dark thoughts. Difficulties were still present, but awareness of my gratitude was shifting my view, letting me see that everything was not dark and cold—in fact, many sights and sounds were quite lovely.

There was nothing particularly special going on, but I noticed that being grateful for little things was already lifting my dark thoughts.

Would you like to join me in cultivating a bit of gratitude together?

Mindfulness Practice: Cultivate Gratitude Through the Senses

  1. Use the breath to anchor yourself in the present moment. Our minds are always so easily pulled to busyness. Bring particular attention to feeling the breath, or something in the body, as you bring your shoulders down and orient your attention toward gratitude.
  2. Next, bring to mind a sight you are grateful for. Move through your senses, and find one thing to start with that you appreciate that comes to you from the world of sight, if you have this available. It could be a color…a shadow…a shape…a movement. Remember, it will never be like this again. What do you see right now, and can you feel grateful that you get to see this, whatever it is?
  3. Now, shift to a scent you appreciate. As you continue to work with your senses, now take time to tune in with appreciation to an aroma. What do you notice? What about that glorious or interesting or subtle smell is making you smile? It could be gratitude for something familiar: a scent that brings comfort, upliftment; or maybe it’s something you’ve never smelled before, and it just piques your curiosity, ignites you, enlivens you.
  4. Moving on, tune into any sounds around you. Allowing the world of smell to gently recede into the background, on an in-breath, shift your attention to your ears and the world of sound. Maybe notice what it feels like to really listen. How many sounds can you notice, and can you feel grateful that you’re able to experience sound, if you are? What can you notice about these sounds—far away? close? Perhaps you could play a piece of music that brings you joy, and have gratitude that it’s so available? Or maybe it’s the sound of children laughing, the sound of loved ones breathing, the sound of the beating of your own heart.
  5. The world of touch and texture beckons us next. We find so much to be grateful for in touch! If there’s someone near who you can hug or who can hug you, notice how this makes you feel filled with gratitude for the joy of human contact. Or perhaps you have a beautiful pet that you can stroke and cuddle, or some lovely material with a texture that feels warm to the touch, soft, evocative. Let your senses ignite your gratitude! There’s so much to be appreciative of.
  6. Shift to noticing and appreciating objects around you. Now take a moment to look around: Look down, look up, and from side to side. Appreciate how much effort must have gone into anything at all you own or use. Someone conceived of the need and many people worked on the details of the design. Much care even went into the packaging to deliver your item to you safely. What do you feel when you let yourself be grateful that all that talent went into making your life a little easier?
  7. As you end this practice, carry this attitude of gratitude with you. One last little grateful tip: Why not offer your thanks to each person who does anything at all for you today? Even if it is their job to help you? When you’re grateful, when you let your heart open up and be filled with appreciation, notice how being grateful makes you feel.

I’m so grateful that you tuned in to this gratitude practice, and I appreciate your time, your effort, and your energy to be present, awake, and alive to your precious life. Have a beautiful day.

 

This mindfulness practice provides additional information to an article titled, “Thanks for This,” which appeared in the April 2018 issue of Mindful magazine.

 

 

 

Get Real with Everything: A Savoring Practice

How Gratitude Changes You and Your Brain

The post A 5-Minute Gratitude Practice: Focus on the Good by Tapping into Your Senses appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org

Four Ways to Nourish Happiness with Mindful Eating

Do you want to be happy? I know I want to be happy and I bet the person next to you wants to be happy, too. Everyone wants to be happy. The desire is part of our biology and hard-wired into our brain. But the reason why happiness arises is varied and complex. Many people think that you find happiness; however, happiness isn’t a thing, so it is never lost. Happiness is an experience, and the conditions for you to have the experience of happiness are surprisingly common. Here are four ways mindful eating can help nourish the conditions for happiness, which are already all around you.

Four types of happiness we can tap into when we eat

1) The happiness of sense contact (looking, tasting, smelling, feeling, touch and sound)

The easiest and most obvious way to nourish happiness is to give yourself permission to indulge in the sensory pleasure that abounds when eating. Every time you notice the beauty of food, breathe deeply and smell the aromas of your meal. Notice the sensation of food in your mouth, the touch of the fork in your mouth, or the sound of a bite as you chew. You are nourishing happiness! Go ahead and jump right into the sensory pleasure that is present when eating!

2) The happiness of positive mental states (joy, loving-kindness, compassion, equanimity)

The second way is to observe and appreciate when helpful mental states, such as when joy, self-compassion, and patience arise. Life is stressful and challenging, which is why the ability to offer self-compassion and to have patience in these moments of stress is a special gift. You can start your practice by noticing joy, because pausing and looking for what is “good” in a situation when life is going your way will help you find these stabilizing feelings when you are faced with challenging situations. Look for the happiness that arises when you have helpful thoughts!

You can start your practice by noticing joy, because pausing and looking for what is “good” in a situation when life is going your way will help you find these stabilizing feelings when you are faced with challenging situations.

3) The happiness of concentration (focusing the mind and thoughts on a single project)

The third way is to focus your attention, instead of dividing it into many pieces. When you give yourself permission to focus your attention on one thing, one project, one experience, the typical chatter and distraction that surrounds you begins to quiet and the mind is free to concentrate on the tasks at hand. Creating the opportunities to concentrate the mind and focus your attention on one thing is a precious gift for an over-scheduled life. Savor the joy of concentrating your mind and thoughts on the task at hand.

4) The happiness of insight (experiencing the interconnectedness and common humanity that is part of the human experience)

The fourth way to nourish happiness is to let go of any expectations you may have; for example, the idea that eating mindfully will help you do “X” or “Y.” Don’t distract yourself with tomorrow. Become present and savor the wonder of awareness, the arising of wisdom, the sense of excitement that emerges as you practice mindful eating. Welcome the joy of insight.

If you think about it, the way to eat more mindfully is to practice the skill of noticing the joy and pleasure that is present every day! Nourishing these four types of happiness on a consistent basis when life is good and enjoyable makes every moment more fun. At the same time, it builds emotional strength and resilience when life is challenging.

 

 

 

Get Real with Everything: A Savoring Practice

7 Reminders for Mindful Eating

The post Four Ways to Nourish Happiness with Mindful Eating appeared first on Mindful.

Source: https://www.mindful.org