The Rambling Writer Returns to Greece, Part 16: Farewell to Santorini

Join us in one more stroll along the caldera-edge walkway for last glimpses of this spectacular volcanic Greek island. And after a peek at artifacts of the ancient Hellenic settlement of Thera, a ferry ride!

NOTE: Since my 4-month backpacking trip around Greece too many years ago, I had been longing to return to this magical land of myth, history, and dramatic landscapes. I recently made a fabulous 3-week return trip there, to research additional settings for my novel-in-progress, THE ARIADNE DISCONNECT. My first post in the new series, on September 30, gives an overview of my rambles with my husband Thor from Athens to the islands of Rhodes, Santorini, and Naxos, and finally a pilgrimage to the ancient center of the world at Delphi.

Getting ready to board the ferry to our next island destination of Naxos, Thor and I took a last walk to enjoy the views before visiting the small Archaeological Museum of Thera. This time we headed north, looking toward the village of Oia at the tip of the caldera.

Again, we’re struck by the contrasts here– pristine white buildings like honeycombs clustered along the raw volcanic cliffs. And lots of luxury hotels with infinity pools to refresh visitors to this hot, arid island. (Some locals are not pleased with this water use, though the economy depends on luxury tourism.)

The charming small museum in downtown Fira gave us glimpses of the island’s history after the devastating 1600 BC eruption that buried ancient Akrotiri. In the 8th century BC, Dorian settlers from Sparta arrived to build a new town and port across the island on the eastern shore. It remained a backwater until the 3rd century BC, when the Ptolemaic wartime fleet for the Aegean was stationed in the harbor, and the city was rebuilt with imposing buildings in the Hellenic style. Later, the Romans occupied the port, and then it became part of the Byzantine empire (the usual history in these parts). In 726 AD, the volcano once more had its way with a relatively minor eruption that nevertheless covered the city with a layer of pumice and ash, and the city was abandoned.

Thor and I didn’t make it across the island to visit the excavations, but I’ve borrowed a photo from Wikipedia:

Again, a contrast struck us, as we considered the difference in styles between the Minoan-influenced art of Akrotiri, with its peaceful scenes of dolphins, flowers, and lovely ladies, and the Mycenean/Dorian depictions of warriors. This is a kylix, or drinking “cup,” much larger than what we would call an individual cup:

And here is its lower rim:

This is classic black-figure decoration used around the 5th to 6th centuries in Greece. These large kylix held wine mixed with water, usually used for male-only symposia. As the drinker gradually lowered the wine level, the scene inside the bowl would be revealed. Sometimes these were humorous or sexually-provocative images designed to add to the festive occasion.

In the museum, we also saw several images of the humorous, phallic Silenus figure, akin to satyrs and said to be a drinking companion of Dionysos:

This Silenus seemed to be enjoying his donkey ride!

And, yes, Dionysos is still alive in the spirits of the Greeks, as well as an important force in my novel-in-progress with its mythic roots. This nearby restaurant joins him with the theory of Santorini/Thira as the lost island of Atlantis:

Some pottery vessels in the museum took the shape of animals or mythical beings, such as this Harpy or Siren. The half-woman, half-birds sometimes symbolized dangerous storm winds, and Odysseus on his journey encountered them.

This vessel is shaped like one of the wild boars that were the object of dangerous hunts using dogs and spears, and providing a prized catch for feasts and offerings to the gods. In my novel-in-progress, THE ARIADNE DISCONNECT, Peter Mitchell finds himself forcefully thrown into just such a wild boar hunt with the fierce Corybantes on the slopes of Mount Parnassos.

And the gentler Hellenic images were also present, like this lovely red-figure vessel with love-goddess Aphrodite and winged Eros:

And this classic marble relief profile:

This marble lion calls to mind the lions of the sacred island of Delos:

And, speaking of the contrasts between Akrotiri and Thera arts, I realized that in an earlier post (#14) I forgot to include the following discussion of the Akrotiri fresco techniques from that museum. As some of you have expressed interest in the historical evolution, I’ll add it here:

And, of course, those lively blue monkeys:

Pondering the riches of the past, Thor and I enjoyed our last al fresco sunset dinner overlooking the caldera.

And the next day, after a terrifying shuttle ride down precipitous switchbacks, we joined the throngs waiting to board the giant ferry to Naxos on our quest to visit the stomping grounds of  Dionysos and Ariadne. These were the passengers unloading. Seriously, the throngs kept pouring out of the ferry for about five minutes. It seemed impossible that the boat could hold so many, or that all the passengers would find transportation to the top of the cliff.

Since my years-ago previous trip to the islands had involved some funky, crowded conditions on local ferries, I had booked ahead on this one to get “business class” for a few dollars more. We hadn’t expected a luxe bar and lounge:

From the windows we waved farewell to Santorini.

A last toast to this fascinating island of geologic and historic drama. “Chairete!” Rejoice!

*****

You will now find The Rambling Writer’s blog posts here every Saturday. Sara’s latest novel from Book View Cafe is available in print and ebook: The Ariadne Connection.  It’s a near-future thriller set in the Greek islands. “Technology triggers a deadly new plague. Can a healer find the cure?”  The novel has received the Cygnus Award for Speculative Fiction. Sara has recently returned from a research trip in Greece and is back at work on the sequel, The Ariadne Disconnect. Sign up for her quarterly email newsletter at www.sarastamey.com

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The Rambling Writer Returns to Greece, Part 16: Farewell to Santorini

Join us in one more stroll along the caldera-edge walkway for last glimpses of this spectacular volcanic Greek island. And after a peek at artifacts of the ancient Hellenic settlement of Thera, a ferry ride!

NOTE: Since my 4-month backpacking trip around Greece too many years ago, I had been longing to return to this magical land of myth, history, and dramatic landscapes. I recently made a fabulous 3-week return trip there, to research additional settings for my novel-in-progress, THE ARIADNE DISCONNECT. My first post in the new series, on September 30, gives an overview of my rambles with my husband Thor from Athens to the islands of Rhodes, Santorini, and Naxos, and finally a pilgrimage to the ancient center of the world at Delphi.

Getting ready to board the ferry to our next island destination of Naxos, Thor and I took a last walk to enjoy the views before visiting the small Archaeological Museum of Thera. This time we headed north, looking toward the village of Oia at the tip of the caldera.

Again, we’re struck by the contrasts here– pristine white buildings like honeycombs clustered along the raw volcanic cliffs. And lots of luxury hotels with infinity pools to refresh visitors to this hot, arid island. (Some locals are not pleased with this water use, though the economy depends on luxury tourism.)

The charming small museum in downtown Fira gave us glimpses of the island’s history after the devastating 1600 BC eruption that buried ancient Akrotiri. In the 8th century BC, Dorian settlers from Sparta arrived to build a new town and port across the island on the eastern shore. It remained a backwater until the 3rd century BC, when the Ptolemaic wartime fleet for the Aegean was stationed in the harbor, and the city was rebuilt with imposing buildings in the Hellenic style. Later, the Romans occupied the port, and then it became part of the Byzantine empire (the usual history in these parts). In 726 AD, the volcano once more had its way with a relatively minor eruption that nevertheless covered the city with a layer of pumice and ash, and the city was abandoned.

Thor and I didn’t make it across the island to visit the excavations, but I’ve borrowed a photo from Wikipedia:

Again, a contrast struck us, as we considered the difference in styles between the Minoan-influenced art of Akrotiri, with its peaceful scenes of dolphins, flowers, and lovely ladies, and the Mycenean/Dorian depictions of warriors. This is a kylix, or drinking “cup,” much larger than what we would call an individual cup:

And here is its lower rim:

This is classic black-figure decoration used around the 5th to 6th centuries in Greece. These large kylix held wine mixed with water, usually used for male-only symposia. As the drinker gradually lowered the wine level, the scene inside the bowl would be revealed. Sometimes these were humorous or sexually-provocative images designed to add to the festive occasion.

In the museum, we also saw several images of the humorous, phallic Silenus figure, akin to satyrs and said to be a drinking companion of Dionysos:

This Silenus seemed to be enjoying his donkey ride!

And, yes, Dionysos is still alive in the spirits of the Greeks, as well as an important force in my novel-in-progress with its mythic roots. This nearby restaurant joins him with the theory of Santorini/Thira as the lost island of Atlantis:

Some pottery vessels in the museum took the shape of animals or mythical beings, such as this Harpy or Siren. The half-woman, half-birds sometimes symbolized dangerous storm winds, and Odysseus on his journey encountered them.

This vessel is shaped like one of the wild boars that were the object of dangerous hunts using dogs and spears, and providing a prized catch for feasts and offerings to the gods. In my novel-in-progress, THE ARIADNE DISCONNECT, Peter Mitchell finds himself forcefully thrown into just such a wild boar hunt with the fierce Corybantes on the slopes of Mount Parnassos.

And the gentler Hellenic images were also present, like this lovely red-figure vessel with love-goddess Aphrodite and winged Eros:

And this classic marble relief profile:

This marble lion calls to mind the lions of the sacred island of Delos:

And, speaking of the contrasts between Akrotiri and Thera arts, I realized that in an earlier post (#14) I forgot to include the following discussion of the Akrotiri fresco techniques from that museum. As some of you have expressed interest in the historical evolution, I’ll add it here:

And, of course, those lively blue monkeys:

Pondering the riches of the past, Thor and I enjoyed our last al fresco sunset dinner overlooking the caldera.

And the next day, after a terrifying shuttle ride down precipitous switchbacks, we joined the throngs waiting to board the giant ferry to Naxos on our quest to visit the stomping grounds of  Dionysos and Ariadne. These were the passengers unloading. Seriously, the throngs kept pouring out of the ferry for about five minutes. It seemed impossible that the boat could hold so many, or that all the passengers would find transportation to the top of the cliff.

Since my years-ago previous trip to the islands had involved some funky, crowded conditions on local ferries, I had booked ahead on this one to get “business class” for a few dollars more. We hadn’t expected a luxe bar and lounge:

From the windows we waved farewell to Santorini.

A last toast to this fascinating island of geologic and historic drama. “Chairete!” Rejoice!

*****

You will now find The Rambling Writer’s blog posts here every Saturday. Sara’s latest novel from Book View Cafe is available in print and ebook: The Ariadne Connection.  It’s a near-future thriller set in the Greek islands. “Technology triggers a deadly new plague. Can a healer find the cure?”  The novel has received the Cygnus Award for Speculative Fiction. Sara has recently returned from a research trip in Greece and is back at work on the sequel, The Ariadne Disconnect. Sign up for her quarterly email newsletter at www.sarastamey.com

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The best closet ever.

Well hello there! Ready for the weekend? We have some fun plans. The snow started melting today and should throughout the weekend so that’s an extra bonus. We saw The Greatest Showman today and it was fantastic. We’ve heard so much about it and it exceeded my expectations. 
I mentioned earlier this week that I’ve been an organizing fool lately. It’s been fun to figure out how our spaces work and what functions best. I purposefully waited to do this because I didn’t want to put in all this work to find out later we didn’t use the everything like I thought. Of course it will still change over time, but for now I’m thrilled with how it’s coming together!
This closet was a doozy. It’s my favorite in the house. (Do normal people have a favorite closet?)When I shared our mud room/laundry a couple months ago, I told you I was most excited about the closet we added in the room. A closet JUST for cleaning crap. Hello! 
But it quickly became our dumping ground, which I was OK with knowing I’d get to it eventually. Here’s how it looked the night I started:
It held tons of stuff but wasn’t functional at all. You can see one of the vacuums (I keep the other one in the basement where we have more carpet) lived outside the closet which isn’t dreamy at all. 😂 There was obviously no room for it. We had quite a few things I wanted to fit in this closet:
  • utility stuff like batteries and light bulbs
  • cleaning rags, sponges and the like
  • cleaning supplies
  • vacuum, brooms, swiffers, etc. (we have a lot of these because I use one for different needs)
  • ironing stuff — boards, (we have large and small ones) and iron
  • wrapping items like paper, bags, ribbon, etc.
  • carpet cleaner machine
I quickly realized not all of this was going to fit, more on that in a minute. 
Here’s another look at what we were dealing with:

Good times!!
As I do anytime I start an organizing project, I took every single thing out of the closet. First goal is to purge what we don’t need anymore. 
This is where it got hard for me. I mention the Konmari method every time I organize something, because it changed my life for the better. I’ve gotten VERY good at letting go of things. Very good. But I discovered I have a weird thing with cleaning supplies. I couldn’t let go of them!
And look how much we had!:
What in the world? Here’s one thing I’ve learned since moving in this house — from this point on like items will live together. At the last house I had a cabinet I built in our laundry room that held all of our extra cleaning supplies and paper items. 
When we moved I was appalled at how many cleaning supplies we had, because they were out of site, out of mind. Keeping them down in the basement in a cabinet I rarely opened didn’t work. We bought more of stuff not knowing what we had. 
I used to use mainly one cleaning brand exclusively around the house — I have concentrate I would mix up. I don’t know why I got away from that and we ended up with so many bottles of stuff, but I know a big part of it was not having it all in one spot. 
I’ve learned people! No more. But I stood there literally frozen in front of it all, having a hard time letting it go. I kind of smacked myself out of it (figuratively) and went back to what I learned with the Konmari method — do I LOVE the product and (my addition) does it work well? 
I was able to start going through items and first decided what I didn’t even like. I had a lot of carpet cleaning stuff and I’ve only found a couple that really work well. The rest went away. I had three cans of a cleaner that were filled in various amounts. I kept the one that was the most full and donated the rest. If I never used it — it was in the donate pile. I was able to whittle it down to a third and stuff we actually USE. Actually a third of that is just empty bottles I plan to use for the concentrate.
Another item I struggled to let go of (and it is so silly) were cleaning rags. We had WAY too many. They multiply in dark closets. And again it was hard for me to let go of them, which is just weird. I stood there thinking, "Why are you being weird about this? They’re rags!" Again, I got myself in gear and sorted through them: 
Overall I didn’t get rid of much other than rags and cleaning stuff. One thing I easily put in the donate pile was the bag of vacuum attachments that I’ve kept for eight years and never used one time. Gone!
It was more about figuring out the space than anything. I started on the side where I hung the ironing boards and iron:
The little board on the bottom is for shirt sleeves. It’s awesome. The smaller one is a favorite and I use it more than the large board. It’s from IKEA and is great for quick items. I also use it when I’m hemming drapes with fusable webbing
One of the biggies in here was the wrapping stuff. I really wanted it to live in this room because I’m usually running out the door with a gift and needing a bag or tissue paper. More often than not I’d stop and buy something. I thought about organizing it out in the open (we have a large wall over the folding table I could have used for this). But I really didn’t want to have it out — I want to keep the room clean and streamlined so I preferred it tucked away. I looked into all kinds of ways to do this (I was out of floor space) and then came across this pegboard and components at IKEA:
It fit perfectly on the wall and it holds a ton! I have gift bags of all sizes, tons of tissue, tags and banners, tape and then ribbon and pens and random stuff in the hanging bag. LOVE this thing!! It is great:
And it’s completely out of the way. I wanted to keep my wrapping paper in here as well but was out wall and floor space. So I grabbed a couple of these plastic jobbies from IKEA as well (we use one in the pantry for plastic grocery bags) and hung them on the back of the door. Not gonna lie, it pained me to put holes in the door. But they are solid wood so I can (fairly) easily fill them if I ever decide to move these:
You can see how I built the big blackboard here! Those are only two bucks each, but if you don’t have a store near you, they’re available here too. 
There were a couple things I didn’t end up putting in here and those were light bulbs and batteries. I put the extra metal shelf (also from IKEA — bought them when we moved in for $13) in the garage by the door. So we can easily access them when needed. I was thinking of what we reach for most — I grab cleaning supplies way more than light bulbs. 
Here’s how it came together:
Everything has a place and I love it!! And I’m loving the double doors. It’s so nice to be able to open them both up and have full view of the closet. We have them in a bedroom upstairs too and although they take up floor space, I really like them. 
Do you spy the outlet? I had one added so I can charge that little vacuum. It’s great for little messes and quick cleaning in the kitchen. I just have to find the charger now. 😉 
Here’s what this side was pared down to:
I use (affiliate) those Sterilite bins everywhere. (You can see them in the linen closet here.)
Not bad considering this is where I started (I had two shelves on that side before)!: 
It is such a lovely feeling to open a closet and find exactly what I want! AND it’s even nicer to have a place for items we used to just throw in there. 😉 
These are my two biggest tips when purging and organizing — even though it’s a pain sometimes, taking everything to ONE location really does help. You see the multiples you have and it’s easier to let things go. And think hard about what you love and use. It helps me focus! 
Have you been working on closets? Cabinets? Under the sink? Tis the season! 

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A Short Guide to Japanese Bags

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The Japanese are often presented online as being masters of their craft. The toiling shoemaker who’s a bit more meticulous and focused than his European counterparts, producing things to the highest level of quality. There’s a strange and sometimes unsettling strand of Orientalism that runs through these narratives, but if there’s anything that can be said of Japanese production, I find it’s more about design.

Japanese companies are tremendously good at design, especially if you have a penchant for classic clothing but want something that feels relevant and updated. Kaptain Sunshine, one of my favorite causalwear labels as of late, is something like a quirkier version of LL Bean. The designs are a little more creative; a little more daring. The silhouettes and details are playful in just the right ways, making them more than just literal reproductions from history.

The same can be said of bags. Before the heritage revival in the US went mainstream – encouraging companies to dust off their archives – Japanese brands were already making their versions of the 1970s-style hiking backpacks, helmet bags, and classic carryalls. If you want a causal bag, it’s worth looking towards Japan. These can be expensive, ranging anywhere from $150 on sale to a whooping $1,000 at full retail, but the designs go a little further than your basic Jansport. And while similarly priced US options are just as nicely made, they’re often too technical – sacrificing form for function.

Like with much of Japanese menswear, the challenge is finding the right companies. Here’s a rundown of some of my favorites (although, not included are seasonal designs from well-known brands such as Visvim, Engineered Garments, Kapital, and nonnative, all of which are worth a look). Where possible, I’ve also included links to US and Western European retailers.

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Porter: The 800-pound gorilla in the room. Porter makes most of the bags you’ll find in this market, either as part of their house label or many fashion collaborations. They’re not just a favorite of businessmen and students in Japan, but also streetwear enthusiasts since at least the 1990s. Porter’s catalog is massive, with a style for almost any wardrobe, although their Tanker is perhaps the most widely recognized. You can find them in the US at Mr. Porter, East Dane, and Club Monaco. I really want their Gore-Tex backpack, although it’s dizzyingly expensive and I’m not sure why any bag needs a breathable membrane (unless you’re carrying around your cat, which OK, on second thought, I definitely need one). 

Briefing: The other big name in this category. Briefing makes military style bags with the sort of webbing you see on tactical assault packs. Frankly, I find their designs to be too sterile – something like the bags you often find in business convention halls – but some people like these for their technical style and exceptional durability. If you like things such as military MOLLE bags, you might appreciate these. 

Master-Piece: For me, a better alternative to Briefing. Master Piece’s bags are technical, but stylish; classic without being retro. They’re typically made from a combination of densely woven nylons and soft leathers, with exceptionally high-end metal trims that cleanly snap into place. I have one of their water-resistant bags and love it. It has different entry points into the bag’s main compartment, and an interior organization system built for modern needs (e.g. a padded sleeve for carrying a laptop). You can find Master-Piece at East Dane and No Man Walks Alone.

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South2 West8: If you like Engineered Garments, you’ll like South2 West8. The designs take after the kind of classic sporting goods you’d find at Orvis, but they’re infinitely more stylish – maybe even goofy looking, but in a good way. They have cotton-canvas rucksacks, printed totes, and carryalls with spacious pockets. I love how the bags feel sporty, but can also be used for things such as trips to the farmers’ market or carrying large headphones and computer chargers. I particularly like their Sunforager painter bag, which is made from a thick cotton fabric that’s so tightly woven, it’s water resistant (much like cotton gabardine). 

Snow Peak: So many outdoor companies here in the US make awful-looking clothes. Snow Peak, on the other hand, produces outdoor performance gear with style. They’re actually an old camping equipment company, having started in the 1950s, but in the last few years, they’ve applied their design sensibility to apparel and accessories. Their water-resistant dry bags are a great way to keep things safe from the rain, whether you’re walking through downtown or trekking through the mountains. 

Made in Occupied Japan: The idea of up-cycling has found new life in fashion lately. Needles Rebuild and Christopher Raeburn, for example, have taken things such as thrift store flannels, parachutes, and even inflatable rafts and turned them into jackets, pants, and shirts. Another interesting company in this vein is Made in Occupied Japan – a niche label that’s taking US Army tents used in Okinawa after the Second World War and transforming them into shoulder bags, totes, and clutches. Any “imperfections” in the material, such as patched up areas or darned-over holes, are purposely kept in for character. Even the zippers and linings are vintage, which together with the vintage shells, give these bags a sense of history before they’re even used. 

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And Wander: Many Japanese companies today are remixing archival Americana and heritage-style accessories. Sanpack and Meanswhile are notable in this regard, and probably the best choice if you’re looking for something to go with a 60/ 40 mountain parka. Lately, however, I’ve been interested in And Wander, whose designs feel more contemporary. Their full-body zipper has the design ingenuity of Mystery Ranch’s Assault Pack, giving you full access to your contents. They also have bags made from cuben fiber, a high-performance fabric that was originally designed for making sails, but today is being used in camping equipment. It’s an exceptional lightweight material, although I mostly like it for its unusual appearance. You can find these at Jinen, Wanderkagu, and Blue in Green.  

Hobo: This company takes its name from those American travelers in the 19th century who rode boxcars in order to find new life elsewhere, carrying all their belongings on their backs. The styles here are surprisingly modern given the company’s name – not like the stuff you’d find at Kapital, which actually do look like hobo bags – but I like the cord-strapped backpacks and climbing-rope-inspired shoulder bags. Like many companies on this list, the bags feel reasonably classic, with lots of inspiration from iconic workwear, but are updated in ways that make them pair easily with most casual wardrobes. 

F/CE: Formerly known as Ficouture, F/CE is a full menswear line stretching from footwear to basic apparel. They also have an extensive collection of bags. Some are made from 1260-denier ballistic nylon, others water-resistant ripstops. Their seasonal collections change, but always carry the brand’s tactical and military-style sensibility. 

Ortus: Most of this list focuses on casual bags, partly because it’s difficult to order a leather bag from one of the better Japanese makers unless you live on the island – most don’t speak English and some have year-long waitlists. Ortus is worth a mention, however, if only because you can buy their bags either ready-made or bespoke through The Armoury. Their bags are excruciatingly expensive, but beautifully handsewn using a technique known as saddle stitching (the same method used at Hermes). Some even feature custom metal hardware, although most have stock hardware originally made in England. This is likely the company you want if you’re looking for a dressier bag to use with tailored clothing. Just be prepared to pay out the nose. 

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Source: http://dieworkwear.com/

Mandy Moore’s Mid-Century Modern Manse


I was telling my friend last weekend about how much I love following Mandy Moore’s mid-century modern house renovation on Instagram. She told me that her friend just wrote an article about it so it seems I’m not alone. Mandy and her fiancé Taylor Goldsmith, who met via Instagram, bought the house a year ago and hired Sarah Sherman Samuel as the interior designer and Emily Farnham as architect. I’m glad I came to the project toward the tail end so I didn’t have to wait long for it to be finished. Some furniture and accessories were delivered yesterday so it was very exciting to see it start to come together.

Even more exciting is that Sarah Sherman Samuel has a tour of the house before the renovation. The house was built in the 1950’s by mid-century architect modern Harold B. Zook and then underwent a terrible renovation in the 1990’s. Now it looks better than it probably did when it was built with help from Bronstruction, Eaton Designs, Terremoto Landscape, and Johnston Vidal Projects.

I’m not a big mid-century modern fan but I can honestly say that I love this house. The team filled it with really interesting and special design details that make it so appealing. I also love the use of brass and gold-tone fixtures and hardware that keep it warm and welcoming.

These photos are some I took from Instagram so they are still a work in progress. I will keep you posted on when the final finished home is published in a magazine because I can’t imagine a magazine not wanting to publish it.

Owner Mandy Moore with Emily Farnham and Sarah Sherman Samuel.

Notice how the fireplace hood has been polished from the previous photo. I love that they kept the original brick.

The kitchen and bathrooms are my favorite rooms of the house since they had such a drastic makeover from what it looked like when Mandy purchased the house. The rooms seem to embrace the outside now and the colors complement the views too. You can read about the plan for the kitchen and see before photos here. The lower cabinets are Farrow & Ball Mizzle.

Mandy joked about all the bowls that were delivered for the kitchen and there were a lot from Year and Day.

A detail of the updated fireplace with custom terrazzo bench and floor with brass inlay. All the floors in the home were replaced.

Another look at that wall with the television that can display artwork.

A view to the outside.

A custom designed built-in sofa in the library.

A look at the custom designed bed in the master bedroom that’s not quite finished.

View of the very chic master bathroom. To see the plan for the master bath and what it looked like pre-renovation, click here.

A peek at one of the guest rooms.

This is a very special guest bathroom. To see the plan and before photos, click here.

Detail of the Fireclay Tile.

Another view of the guest bathroom.

View of the guest bathroom with a better look at the custom brass inlay pattern.

A look at the second guest bathroom. You can see the design plan and before photos here.

A view of the back of the houe.

A view of the pool and custom bench.

The side of the house.

A vintage photo of the side of the house.

An amazing view of the house with a vintage car in the carport.

Photos for this post are from @mandymooremm, @sarahshermansamuel, and @emilyfarnhamarchitecture

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