KidLit: Celebrating Diversity and Social Justice on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Alli Brydon, a children’s book editor and writer based in the New York City—and a friend from the time we both worked at the same publishing house there—has generously agreed to be a guest contributor and help us expand our childrens’-book libraries. I hope you will enjoy her company as much as I do. 

Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and what better way to begin to learn about the struggles and shining achievements of African Americans than through children’s books. There is a huge push for diversity in children’s literature right now, through much-needed movements like #WeNeedDiverseBooks and #pocinpub (please check them out!)—but this is only very recent. Reading books about Martin Luther King, Jr. with my kids reminds me of how far we still need to go.

With many of us looking for more diversity and social justice for our kids’ book collections, these amazing titles will set you off on the right path. I hope you’ll seek out these books and make them perennials in your libraries…

Martin Rising: Requiem for a King. Just published at the “rising” of the new year, a book of verse by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney. The Pinkneys are children’s book royalty, they are outstanding, and they never ever disappoint! (For ages 9 – 12)

I Have a Dream, by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Kadir Nelson. This illustrated edition of Dr. King’s most famous speech is absolutely jaw-dropping, with award-winning artist Kadir Nelson’s realistic-style paintings. It also comes with a CD of the speech! (For ages 5+)

Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, by Vashti Harrison. This remarkable debut came out late last year, and shines a light on the stories of 40 amazing Black American female scientists, artists, writers, politicians, and more. (For ages 6 – 8)

I am Martin Luther King, Jr. (Ordinary People Change the World). An important entry in a great biography series, which also features notable figures Rosa Parks and Jackie Robinson. A great one for graphic novel and comic lovers by Brad Meltzer and Chris Eliopoulos. (For ages 5 – 8)

Martin’s Dream (Ready-to-Read), by Jane Kurtz and Amy June Bates. MLK’s story is conveyed in a very accessible way in this level 1 beginning reader, and is told in a lyrical, rhyming fashion so it’s also satisfying to read out loud. (For ages 4 – 6)

You Should Meet… Misty Copeland, Mae Jemison, Katherine Johnson, Jesse Owens, by various authors. This same early reader series as above (Ready-to-Read) has recently branched out with this mini-series of wonderful biographies about trailblazing African Americans in recent history. For more advanced readers, as they are all level 3s. (For ages 6 – 8)

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race. For fans of the film, based on the #1 New York Times bestseller, there is a Hidden Figures picture book (cool!), by Margot Lee Shetterly and Laura Freeman, out tomorrow! (For ages 4 – 8)

Be a King: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream and You. Just published a couple of weeks ago by one of my favorite authors, Carole Boston Weatherford, with gorgeous illustrations by James E. Ransome. An award-winning team brings the spirit of social activism to young readers and empowers them to continue the fight. The best kind of biography, and one that Dr. King would likely have encouraged. (For ages 4 – 8)

Do you have any favorites to add?

Alli Brydon is a children’s book editor and writer based in the New York City area. With nearly 15 years of experience developing, editing, and selling children’s books with US publishing houses, she has spent a large part of her career nurturing writers and illustrators to reach their potential. Having worked both as an acquiring editor and as an agent for children’s book author/illustrators, Alli has a unique blend of skills and an insider’s view of the industry. If you love reading kidlit and/or are curious about writing your own, please drop in at allibrydon.com to learn more, sign up to receive her blog posts by email, or just say “hi!”

[Lead image from Be A King, illustration by James E. Ransome; all other cover images from their respective links]

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KidLit: Celebrating Diversity and Social Justice on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Alli Brydon, a children’s book editor and writer based in the New York City—and a friend from the time we both worked at the same publishing house there—has generously agreed to be a guest contributor and help us expand our childrens’-book libraries. I hope you will enjoy her company as much as I do. 

Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and what better way to begin to learn about the struggles and shining achievements of African Americans than through children’s books. There is a huge push for diversity in children’s literature right now, through much-needed movements like #WeNeedDiverseBooks and #pocinpub (please check them out!)—but this is only very recent. Reading books about Martin Luther King, Jr. with my kids reminds me of how far we still need to go.

With many of us looking for more diversity and social justice for our kids’ book collections, these amazing titles will set you off on the right path. I hope you’ll seek out these books and make them perennials in your libraries…

Martin Rising: Requiem for a King. Just published at the “rising” of the new year, a book of verse by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney. The Pinkneys are children’s book royalty, they are outstanding, and they never ever disappoint! (For ages 9 – 12)

I Have a Dream, by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Kadir Nelson. This illustrated edition of Dr. King’s most famous speech is absolutely jaw-dropping, with award-winning artist Kadir Nelson’s realistic-style paintings. It also comes with a CD of the speech! (For ages 5+)

Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, by Vashti Harrison. This remarkable debut came out late last year, and shines a light on the stories of 40 amazing Black American female scientists, artists, writers, politicians, and more. (For ages 6 – 8)

I am Martin Luther King, Jr. (Ordinary People Change the World). An important entry in a great biography series, which also features notable figures Rosa Parks and Jackie Robinson. A great one for graphic novel and comic lovers by Brad Meltzer and Chris Eliopoulos. (For ages 5 – 8)

Martin’s Dream (Ready-to-Read), by Jane Kurtz and Amy June Bates. MLK’s story is conveyed in a very accessible way in this level 1 beginning reader, and is told in a lyrical, rhyming fashion so it’s also satisfying to read out loud. (For ages 4 – 6)

You Should Meet… Misty Copeland, Mae Jemison, Katherine Johnson, Jesse Owens, by various authors. This same early reader series as above (Ready-to-Read) has recently branched out with this mini-series of wonderful biographies about trailblazing African Americans in recent history. For more advanced readers, as they are all level 3s. (For ages 6 – 8)

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race. For fans of the film, based on the #1 New York Times bestseller, there is a Hidden Figures picture book (cool!), by Margot Lee Shetterly and Laura Freeman, out tomorrow! (For ages 4 – 8)

Be a King: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream and You. Just published a couple of weeks ago by one of my favorite authors, Carole Boston Weatherford, with gorgeous illustrations by James E. Ransome. An award-winning team brings the spirit of social activism to young readers and empowers them to continue the fight. The best kind of biography, and one that Dr. King would likely have encouraged. (For ages 4 – 8)

Do you have any favorites to add?

Alli Brydon is a children’s book editor and writer based in the New York City area. With nearly 15 years of experience developing, editing, and selling children’s books with US publishing houses, she has spent a large part of her career nurturing writers and illustrators to reach their potential. Having worked both as an acquiring editor and as an agent for children’s book author/illustrators, Alli has a unique blend of skills and an insider’s view of the industry. If you love reading kidlit and/or are curious about writing your own, please drop in at allibrydon.com to learn more, sign up to receive her blog posts by email, or just say “hi!”

[Lead image from Be A King, illustration by James E. Ransome; all other cover images from their respective links]

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Sidewalk Cafes (& Friday Links)



I was filling out a survey about our downtown earlier this week, and it struck me that my very favorite favorite spaces all have one thing in common: sidewalk seating. It’s one of the things I miss most about New York (and would miss even there, sometimes, during the winter). It made me curious, what do you like best about your city’s downtown?

An essay on downtowns for people, and more things I’ve been taking note of recently, follow below.

Have a good weekend!

Jane Jacobs’ 1958-essay on downtowns still holds up. So many gems!

I saw these reading glasses in Kristin Bell’s Instastory this week, and while they look ridiculous, I think they’re so brilliant! No more tired arms.

Just in case you missed it, Oprah delivered a phenomenal speech at the Golden Globes.

A handful of you wrote to ask about my down jacket from our Tahoe pics on Instagram. It was Zara, but a few seasons ago. I found this one on Abercrombie, and think it would be great with its cinch-able waist (and it’s half-off).

Also, in regards to down-filled warmth: I’d been waiting for this vest to come back into stock after seeing that Linda Rodin is a fan.

So that’s why it feels weird to poke your belly button? Try it. It’s wild!

Another long-needed explanation? Why paper cuts hurt so much. Fascinating!

Can you microwave that? Ever been hesitant? Now there’s a guide.

I don’t often get excited about makeup, but this undereye primer is amazing and has me looking much more awake on sleepy mornings. I use it on its own or under concealer.

Sarah Silverman shows you a better way to respond to trolling. Wow.

We need to talk some post-partum truth!  (via Reading My Tea Leaves)

From the news desk, how to world is responding to Trump’s (latest) offensive remarks.

“In appearing to suggest that immigrants from places like El Salvador, Haiti, Liberia, and Sierra Leone couldn’t become productive and assimilated American citizens, the press-office statement demonstrated that deep racial prejudices extend beyond the Oval Office to other parts of the White House.” Yes! Wish we could all just agree on this, now. Everyone registered to vote?

[Photo taken in the West Village; here are more

New York City posts

]

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What I learned from 2017 roundups

I wanted to read all of the incredible 2017 roundup lists out there—the best of, well, anything you can imagine—but couldn’t possibly keep up. Still, here are some gems I found from sifting through what I could…

Resting your chocolate chip dough produces the best chocolate chip cookies. (Via Buzz Feed‘s cool cooking tricks of 2017)

Routine can help you feel like a local: a travel tip from Samantha Brown who says “No matter where I go I do one thing, the same thing, every single day to feel more like a local.” (Via Condé Nast Traveler)

Sesame Street made a rubber ducky version of “Despacito” this year. (Via Man Repeller‘s pop culture highlights)

Sally Hansen Miracle Gel makes any manicure a gel one without the UV light. (Via Coveteur’s drugstore beauty list)

Getting specific about what you’re going to do is maybe the key to reaching your workout goal. (Via Meg Biram)

That I have a lot of TV to catch up on, but Alias Grace is going up the list. (via Emily Nussbaum’s New Yorker TV roundup)

Also, that I need to watch Call Me By Your Name, stat. (via The Guardian‘s list of best movies of the year)

S-Town tops the list of my still must download podcasts (via The Atlantic‘s list of 50 best podcasts)

None of the girls condemned at the Salem Witch Trials were actually burned at the stake. (via a Buzz Feed 2017 list)

That the response to “Cat Person” was so incredible that it became the second-most read New Yorker article of the year in only the last three weeks of the year.

Gossip Girl is 10 years old (!) and you can read an oral history. (Via Pure Wow‘s best articles of 2017 roundup)

What we know about American Democracy shifted a lot last year. (via Vox)

Diane Keaton designed a house based on Pinterest. (Via Apartment 34‘s top pins of 2017)

We are all (still) looking to declutter. The golden rule is “if you don’t use it daily, put it away.” (Via Apartment Therapy)

Tandoori-spiced cauliflower is a thing I need to try. (Via Design Sponge‘s best of food list, and I Love India)

That this round-up of Ikea built-in hacks remains a favorite on here, so in in light of that I spotted an incredible under-stair version in this Apartment Therapy roundup.

How to do an updo with short hair. (Via A Beautiful Mess‘s best-of list)

Wolves start exploring the world when they’re blind and deaf, and other key differences between wolves and dogs. (via New York Times Science section, What we learned)

That men travelling first class tend to weigh more than those in economy, while for women the reverse is true. (Lucy Hooker, via Kotke’s 2017 list)

Also, someone else made a “what I learned” list and it has some fascinating articles, like this tragic one about pine nut harvesters on the Chinese border with North Korea. (They use gas-powered balloons.)

Any fun or mind-blowing tips you took away from all of those year-end roundups? 

P.S. More chocolate chip cookie tips, depending on how you like yours.

[Photo by Peter DaSilva for the New York Times]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A sweater to cozy up to

I couldn’t pull the trigger on this nearly-$300 sweater, but I find myself wondering if that were a mistake every time I look at it—now that it’s sold out. I feel like it’s got all of the right elements of the pullover of the moment: cable-knit, bubble sleeves, a slightly higher collar with a slightly shorter waist, and that muted shade of (what they call) macaroon.

Ultimately, it’s the of-the-moment-ness of it that has me searching for more solid-color pullovers like it. Here are some favorites I found, all of which I’d be quite happy to get cozy with.

Pom Pom Lulu Sweater in Macaroon: The inspiration for my current sweater obsession. Sold out, but they tend to repeat styles in new colors for new seasons—like this flecked oatmeal version. Shop Dôen is pricey,  but I love that it’s a collective of women based out of Los Angeles who are behind it.

Loving the yellow in this super soft blouson sleeve number.

Merino wool should keep this one from being scratchy. The mock neck and long sleeves are a nice combination. There’s another version with bubble sleeves that looks awfully good, too—in more colors.

The Madewell take on the cropped cableknit—in pink! There are more sizes in two other colors without the high neck.

While we’re thinking pink, here’s H&M’s cozy-looking mohair blend…

… Anthropologie’s Cabled Chenille Pullover (I also love this Sitka Textured Pullover)…

…and Abercrombie’s Airspun Mock Neck Cable Sweater (on sale).

UO’s own label put out a wide-cut, relaxed-fit take on the trend.  (The red beret doesn’t hurt, does it?)

A perfectly slouchy turteneck to live in.

This cotton-blend sweater, with its exaggerated blouson sleeves, comes in a variety of colors.

Can’t get enough of this mustard color this season? There’s a seam detail on the sleeves where they get a bit wider above the cuff.

L.L. Bean’s fisherman sweaters are truly classic. (And last for years.) This tunic-cut is an update—slightly fitted with a rounded hem and zippers as the zip. Of the five colors, the ivory is beautiful, of course, but I’d like to try this darker version.

Other notable mentions: Everlane, Everlane (again), and Amazon.

I feel like I was all about the cardigans last year, and am now wishing I’d kept more of my pullovers. Which of these would you choose? Any favorites you bought? Or wish you did? 

P.S. Those vintage Levi’s in the top image are something else to covet. These are supposed to have a similarly flattering fit.

[Images from their respective sources. Top image via Shop Dôen]

 

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A sweater to cozy up to

I couldn’t pull the trigger on this nearly-$300 sweater, but I find myself wondering if that were a mistake every time I look at it—now that it’s sold out. I feel like it’s got all of the right elements of the pullover of the moment: cable-knit, bubble sleeves, a slightly higher collar with a slightly shorter waist, and that muted shade of (what they call) macaroon.

Ultimately, it’s the of-the-moment-ness of it that has me searching for more solid-color pullovers like it. Here are some favorites I found, all of which I’d be quite happy to get cozy with.

Pom Pom Lulu Sweater in Macaroon: The inspiration for my current sweater obsession. Sold out, but they tend to repeat styles in new colors for new seasons—like this flecked oatmeal version. Shop Dôen is pricey,  but I love that it’s a collective of women based out of Los Angeles who are behind it.

Loving the yellow in this super soft blouson sleeve number.

Merino wool should keep this one from being scratchy. The mock neck and long sleeves are a nice combination. There’s another version with bubble sleeves that looks awfully good, too—in more colors.

The Madewell take on the cropped cableknit—in pink! There are more sizes in two other colors without the high neck.

While we’re thinking pink, here’s H&M’s cozy-looking mohair blend…

… Anthropologie’s Cabled Chenille Pullover (I also love this Sitka Textured Pullover)…

…and Abercrombie’s Airspun Mock Neck Cable Sweater (on sale).

UO’s own label put out a wide-cut, relaxed-fit take on the trend.  (The red beret doesn’t hurt, does it?)

A perfectly slouchy turteneck to live in.

This cotton-blend sweater, with its exaggerated blouson sleeves, comes in a variety of colors.

Can’t get enough of this mustard color this season? There’s a seam detail on the sleeves where they get a bit wider above the cuff.

L.L. Bean’s fisherman sweaters are truly classic. (And last for years.) This tunic-cut is an update—slightly fitted with a rounded hem and zippers as the zip. Of the five colors, the ivory is beautiful, of course, but I’d like to try this darker version.

Other notable mentions: Everlane, Everlane (again), and Amazon.

I feel like I was all about the cardigans last year, and am now wishing I’d kept more of my pullovers. Which of these would you choose? Any favorites you bought? Or wish you did? 

P.S. Those vintage Levi’s in the top image are something else to covet. These are supposed to have a similarly flattering fit.

[Images from their respective sources. Top image via Shop Dôen]

 

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Something I read: The Shape of You

Something I read: The Shape of You




Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You” has been on the Hot 100 since it was released on January 6th of last year and topped Billboard’s year-end singles chart—but I confess I’d had no idea who was behind it until yesterday when I was watching this New York Times feature about making the song. The short video is a fascinating look at how some, clearly, very talented musicians produced one of the most distinct (and yes, derivative) songs of the year. “The song has drawn more than 2.8 billion views on YouTube and is also the most-played track ever on Spotify, with more than 1.5 billion streams,” notes the article.

I was struck by comment, “The best songs that I’ve ever written, I don’t really remember writing,” Mr. Sheeran said. “They take like 20 minutes and then they’re just done. And then you move on to the next thing.”

When I used to teach freshman writing classes and would meet with students to discuss their essay drafts, I’d often find that the best line of the essay was the third one down. They’d lead with strained introductory sentences in which so much time had been put, and then they’d hit their stride a few lines in. Oftentimes, they’d hardly noticed writing their strongest thesis.

I made me think: when something seems hard to do, you just have to start. Eventually you’ll forget you’re trying and perhaps something wonderful will come out of it. Maybe not a hit song, but…

In any case, it’s a really great behind-the-scenes video if you haven’t seen it. Songwriter Johnny McDaid also explains that the phrase “the shape of you,” is common in Northern Ireland, where he’s from: “‘whatever you are, whatever it is. I’m in love with you.’ You know, it’s the shape of who you are figuratively.”

P.S. Terry Gross

[Photo Getty Images]

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Getting Organized: Bullet Journal Inspired

There’s something so promising about the purchase of a new planner—and yet something so daunting about choosing the right system. At least that’s how it feels to me. Every year or so, I find myself looking for a more efficient way to keep all of my notes and plans in one place. There are digital systems that people rave about—Evernote seems incredible—but I just can’t stop myself from jotting things down on scraps of paper. I was always the copious note-taker in class. Writing things down is a way for me to commit things to memory.

So I fell quickly down the Bullet Journal (BuJo, colloquially) rabbit hole when I was given an introduction last fall. It’s been a bumpy start…

Admittedly I’m late to the party, but in case you are too: A bullet journal is basically a customizable organization system that you create in a dotted notebook. There’s a nice introductory video on the bullet journal website. Most seem to include a mix of long-term and short term calendars and diaries; tasks and to-do lists; tracking notes of things like diets and habits; and collections of things like “books to read” or “movies to watch,” or maybe simply a shopping list and go-to meals. None of this has to happen in any particular order and you just create it as you go, because there’s an Index that you create at the start to help you easily find your entries.

In other words, you just leave the first couple pages of your notebook blank and give them the topic of “Index.” As you start to use your book, add the topics of your entries and their page numbers to the Index, so you can quickly find them again.

After that, it’s up to you.

Of course the other thing that bullet journals seem to have in common is nice handwriting. Seeing all of the different examples can be really overwhelming. I don’t have time to make pretty headings and worry about perfect handwriting. But I do love the idea of keeping all of my to-do lists and notes and weekly plans in one place.

So I got started: I bought this book—which got high marks for the thickness of the pages—and Le Pen, and I got to work. I pulled all of those scraps of paper out of the bottom of purses and desk drawers and made them into lists; I started tracking my diet and water consumption alongside my goals; and I created a calendar. It was pretty awesome to think of all of that stuff coming together in one place! But that last part has been tricky. I like writing things down, but I don’t need to take the extra time required to make a calendar grid. Drawing straight lines with a ruler when there are so many beautiful paper products with this already done for you seems like a waste of time for me.

I jumped ship. I went back to the Appointed website to look at their notebooks and planners, and actually ordered myself a weekly binder—thinking it would let me bridge the two (a pre-made calendar and a grid system for customizable notes). I started using it instead. But it’s so big! And I can tell already that it’s not something I’m going to be willing to tote around, and thus it will eventually become obsolete as I return to scraps of highly portable paper.

And so I’m back to the bullet journal I started in the fall—because I realized I missed it. After only a few weeks with it, it’s changed what I’ll be looking for in any future system: priorities now include size/portability and ample room for notes. I do think I’ll be going back, eventually, to something with pre-made monthly calendars in it, but I love the flexibility of the dot grids. I haven’t been precious about the pages and simply start a new one when I need to—it seems best while I’m still figuring out what works for me. I also still use Google Calendar for our family appointments.

One of my favorite parts so far is getting more practiced at what they call “rapid logging,” which “relies on the use of short-form bulleted notation. The idea is to use short, objective statements and break tasks into more digestible pieces. You can add in events as well, and it becomes something like a diary.

It’s a bit complicated to explain. Others have done a better job. Some of my favorite examples have been @Honeyrozes (shown above), Whoorl’s video, Tiny Ray of Sunshine, and the original Bullet Journal website‘s blog.

But this is all to say that there are, at the least, elements of this which have changed my outlook on planners and getting organized. So far, having just started, and having gone back and forth a bit, I’ve spent more time setting it up than anything, but for those of us who do like to the pen to paper and make physical lists (and have a million floating around) it’s a great approach to keeping it all in one place. No more notes on receipts!

Have you tried it? How are you getting organized for the new year? Any favorite planners?

P.S. Happy New Year! And more on getting organized: A Calendar Wall, being productive when working remotely, and how to conquer your chore list.

[Photos: Appointed, Bullet Journal/@feebujond, and @HoneyRozes]

 

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Merry Christmas!

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Thank you for making this space such a special thing for me—I’m grateful for your reading throughout the year! Wishing you joy, love, and peace in 2018.

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¡Feliz Navidad! (& Friday links)

Last night will certainly stand out as a holiday highlight for me—we attended Hudson’s first grade concert! Parents and other dedicated fans packed the room and raised their smartphones high while we watched the 60 or so children sing and sway. There was, of course, “Feliz Navidad,” but they’d also memorized Spanish translations of “My Favorite Things,” “Frosty,” “Jingle Bells,” “Dreidel” and others. It was delightful! There were definitely a few yawns on stage as it got closer to the end—nearing bedtime for those six-year-olds—which made Aron and I laugh.

Today, our family arrives from Germany—Aron’s sister, brother-in-law, and their two boys—and everyone is so excited to spend time with them over the break. I get to go off for a manicure and pedicure with the ladies on Saturday morning while all the boys (and Skyler) do… well, I don’t know. But we’ll all decorate cookies when we get back!

And then it’s Christmas eve! Visions of sugarplums and the jolly old elf.

I definitely haven’t watched enough holiday specials. It’s going too fast! Speaking of which, I did just re-watch The Holiday and Little Women (1994). Any favorites? I’ve been told I need to watch A Christmas Prince.

Pass those suggestions along and here are some links of note in the meantime… 

I’m very excited to read this.

Looking for a last-minute holiday craft? These cereal wreaths are so clever!

Must. try. this. banana. bread.

Will the social era ever end?

Related: Facebook’s snooze button

A good sheet-pan-dinner round-up for some new year inspiration.

I haven’t listened to this yet, but New Yorker readers voted it their favorite Fiction podcast of the last ten years (and it involves David Sedaris).

And The Atlantic‘s picks for the 50 best podcasts of the year.

Related: a last-minute holiday gift, and something you should definitely gift yourself, too.

Also, Tickets as a last-minute holiday gift.

(And all of the gift guides—of which much can still be ordered and shipped in time.)

Why people hate McMansions.

Am I too late to add a sweater to live in all week after Christmas to my wishlist? Looking at this in all the colors or this flecked turtleneck one.

Other words the Trump administration might want banned.

“So how does a story on U.F.O.s get into The New York Times? Not easily, and only after a great deal of vetting, I assure you.” Fascinating.

Thank goodness for Samantha Bee.

Young Han Solo auditions. Made me laugh.

I’m not crying. You’re crying. (The year in Google Searches.)

Did you read “Cat Person“? Some thoughts on its resonance, with women in particular.

In love with this children’s book.

Fingerlings are this year’s toy craze. Was there one you recall from your childhood? I remember the Cabbage Patch era.

Finally, some holiday inspiration from the archive…

A layer-cake update on the Yule Log. So easy and delicious.

How to make Holiday felt boards (good for car rides).

The key to a perfectly roasted marshmallow.

And how to choose the right bottle of wine to share.

Good tidings to all!

[Top Photo via SF Girl by Bay; similar Jade cake stand / Bottom photo of Yule Log Cake]

 

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