BVC Eats: Chinese Sticky Rice Stuffing

by Brenda W. Clough

As other bloggers here have noted, food is key. Hobbits love lembas; wizards and Rangers smoke pipeweed. Long before you understand another culture, another race, you are happily eating their food. Thanksgiving is the quintessentially American holiday, because it’s full of other people’s food. So when the Washington Post put out a call for melting-pot Thanksgiving recipes, I obliged with my family’s recipe for sticky rice stuffing.

As I noted in the paper, turkey is not a Chinese favorite. Too big, too flavorless — you don’t see turkey often on restaurant menus in Chinatown, not compared to duck or chicken. However, fifty years ago some smart Chinese cook decided to help the bird along, and invented sticky rice stuffing. It was an instant hit, and a little googling around will find you many many variants — I saw a Laotian one the other day. The recipe below is fairly basic, and also fairly small. I routinely quadruple it, to prevent muttering from the children. It is unquestionably the most popular part of the meal.

You don’t want to stuff the stuffing into the bird, because of the other popular Chinese thing to do with the turkey — make jook with the carcass. All the bones, skin, etc. go into the stockpot, and the stock is used to make rice congee. Turkey jook is the the classic dish to serve on the Sunday after Thanksgiving. However, I’m American born, and what I make with my turkey stock is turkey gumbo: file powder, andouille sausage, and the holy Cajun trinity of green pepper, onion, and celery. And in return I’m certain that somewhere down in New Orleans there’s a nice Louisiana woman making jook this coming weekend.

To save you a click, here’s the recipe:

Chinese Sticky Rice Stuffing

Tested size: 6 servings

Ingredients
  • 2 cups sweet (glutinous) Japanese short-grain rice (see headnote)
  • 12 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup dried Asian shrimp (see headnote)
  • 1 medium onion
  • 3 ribs celery
  • One 8-ounce can whole Chinese water chestnuts, drained and rinsed
  • 3 cups water
  • Vegetable oil
  • 3 or 4 dried Chinese sausages, cut in half lengthwise and then into thin half moons (see headnote)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce, or more as needed

Directions

Place the rice in a mixing bowl, cover with cool water by an inch or two and let sit for 30 minutes. Put the mushrooms in a bowl and cover with hot water to soften them.

Pick over the dried shrimp and remove any heads and bits of shell. Place the dried shrimp in a small bowl and cover with hot water. Let them soak while you cut the onion, celery and water chestnuts into small dice.

Drain the mushrooms and cut them into the same size small dice; do the same with the shrimp.

Drain the rice and put it into a pot with the 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium, cover and cook for about 30 minutes, or until all the water is absorbed and the rice is tender. It will form a sticky mass.

Heat a tablespoon of oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Swirl to coat, then add the onion, celery, water chestnuts, mushrooms, shrimp and sausage; stir-fry just until the onion has softened, then add the sticky rice. Stir-fry, adding the soy sauce until heated through and well incorporated. The rice should be quite sticky. Taste and add more soy sauce, as needed.

Serve hot.

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BVC Eats: Chinese Sticky Rice Stuffing

by Brenda W. Clough

As other bloggers here have noted, food is key. Hobbits love lembas; wizards and Rangers smoke pipeweed. Long before you understand another culture, another race, you are happily eating their food. Thanksgiving is the quintessentially American holiday, because it’s full of other people’s food. So when the Washington Post put out a call for melting-pot Thanksgiving recipes, I obliged with my family’s recipe for sticky rice stuffing.

As I noted in the paper, turkey is not a Chinese favorite. Too big, too flavorless — you don’t see turkey often on restaurant menus in Chinatown, not compared to duck or chicken. However, fifty years ago some smart Chinese cook decided to help the bird along, and invented sticky rice stuffing. It was an instant hit, and a little googling around will find you many many variants — I saw a Laotian one the other day. The recipe below is fairly basic, and also fairly small. I routinely quadruple it, to prevent muttering from the children. It is unquestionably the most popular part of the meal.

You don’t want to stuff the stuffing into the bird, because of the other popular Chinese thing to do with the turkey — make jook with the carcass. All the bones, skin, etc. go into the stockpot, and the stock is used to make rice congee. Turkey jook is the the classic dish to serve on the Sunday after Thanksgiving. However, I’m American born, and what I make with my turkey stock is turkey gumbo: file powder, andouille sausage, and the holy Cajun trinity of green pepper, onion, and celery. And in return I’m certain that somewhere down in New Orleans there’s a nice Louisiana woman making jook this coming weekend.

To save you a click, here’s the recipe:

Chinese Sticky Rice Stuffing

Tested size: 6 servings

Ingredients
  • 2 cups sweet (glutinous) Japanese short-grain rice (see headnote)
  • 12 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup dried Asian shrimp (see headnote)
  • 1 medium onion
  • 3 ribs celery
  • One 8-ounce can whole Chinese water chestnuts, drained and rinsed
  • 3 cups water
  • Vegetable oil
  • 3 or 4 dried Chinese sausages, cut in half lengthwise and then into thin half moons (see headnote)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce, or more as needed

Directions

Place the rice in a mixing bowl, cover with cool water by an inch or two and let sit for 30 minutes. Put the mushrooms in a bowl and cover with hot water to soften them.

Pick over the dried shrimp and remove any heads and bits of shell. Place the dried shrimp in a small bowl and cover with hot water. Let them soak while you cut the onion, celery and water chestnuts into small dice.

Drain the mushrooms and cut them into the same size small dice; do the same with the shrimp.

Drain the rice and put it into a pot with the 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium, cover and cook for about 30 minutes, or until all the water is absorbed and the rice is tender. It will form a sticky mass.

Heat a tablespoon of oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Swirl to coat, then add the onion, celery, water chestnuts, mushrooms, shrimp and sausage; stir-fry just until the onion has softened, then add the sticky rice. Stir-fry, adding the soy sauce until heated through and well incorporated. The rice should be quite sticky. Taste and add more soy sauce, as needed.

Serve hot.

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Source: http://ift.tt/1eIlTf1

BVC Eats: Chinese Sticky Rice Stuffing

by Brenda W. Clough

As other bloggers here have noted, food is key. Hobbits love lembas; wizards and Rangers smoke pipeweed. Long before you understand another culture, another race, you are happily eating their food. Thanksgiving is the quintessentially American holiday, because it’s full of other people’s food. So when the Washington Post put out a call for melting-pot Thanksgiving recipes, I obliged with my family’s recipe for sticky rice stuffing.

As I noted in the paper, turkey is not a Chinese favorite. Too big, too flavorless — you don’t see turkey often on restaurant menus in Chinatown, not compared to duck or chicken. However, fifty years ago some smart Chinese cook decided to help the bird along, and invented sticky rice stuffing. It was an instant hit, and a little googling around will find you many many variants — I saw a Laotian one the other day. The recipe below is fairly basic, and also fairly small. I routinely quadruple it, to prevent muttering from the children. It is unquestionably the most popular part of the meal.

You don’t want to stuff the stuffing into the bird, because of the other popular Chinese thing to do with the turkey — make jook with the carcass. All the bones, skin, etc. go into the stockpot, and the stock is used to make rice congee. Turkey jook is the the classic dish to serve on the Sunday after Thanksgiving. However, I’m American born, and what I make with my turkey stock is turkey gumbo: file powder, andouille sausage, and the holy Cajun trinity of green pepper, onion, and celery. And in return I’m certain that somewhere down in New Orleans there’s a nice Louisiana woman making jook this coming weekend.

To save you a click, here’s the recipe:

Chinese Sticky Rice Stuffing

Tested size: 6 servings

Ingredients
  • 2 cups sweet (glutinous) Japanese short-grain rice (see headnote)
  • 12 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup dried Asian shrimp (see headnote)
  • 1 medium onion
  • 3 ribs celery
  • One 8-ounce can whole Chinese water chestnuts, drained and rinsed
  • 3 cups water
  • Vegetable oil
  • 3 or 4 dried Chinese sausages, cut in half lengthwise and then into thin half moons (see headnote)
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce, or more as needed

Directions

Place the rice in a mixing bowl, cover with cool water by an inch or two and let sit for 30 minutes. Put the mushrooms in a bowl and cover with hot water to soften them.

Pick over the dried shrimp and remove any heads and bits of shell. Place the dried shrimp in a small bowl and cover with hot water. Let them soak while you cut the onion, celery and water chestnuts into small dice.

Drain the mushrooms and cut them into the same size small dice; do the same with the shrimp.

Drain the rice and put it into a pot with the 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium, cover and cook for about 30 minutes, or until all the water is absorbed and the rice is tender. It will form a sticky mass.

Heat a tablespoon of oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Swirl to coat, then add the onion, celery, water chestnuts, mushrooms, shrimp and sausage; stir-fry just until the onion has softened, then add the sticky rice. Stir-fry, adding the soy sauce until heated through and well incorporated. The rice should be quite sticky. Taste and add more soy sauce, as needed.

Serve hot.

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The Inspiration Fairy

This last weekend I attended Orycon 39 with a bunch of very fine people. I had a great time, and I got to meet a lot of terrific people and visit with friends I hadn’t seen in forever. There’s never enough time, but I was glad to grab what I could. While there were a few problems (first time in this venue), overall it was really fun and I enjoyed myself. I will say I’ve never been in such a terrific green room, with a lot of healthy foods available throughout the day and into the evening. The art show was terrific, and the dealer room had a lot of variety, although it was sort of in a corner, which was unfortunate. I was delighted because I did a lot of walking and stairs and so got some exercise.

But my favorite thing was the little statue I got at the art show. There’s this little play written by Kelly McCullough that I love. It makes me laugh and I promise you will too.  Here’s the link. You need to go read it. Seriously. Go. I’ll wait.

Back?

Now for what I bought at the show. Read his chest:

 

This is MY inspiration fairy. He bears a strong resemblance to WC Fields and I adore him. He shall inspire and probably motivate. Discipline can go off to ballet class for gorillas now.

Do you like him?

 

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The Inspiration Fairy

This last weekend I attended Orycon 39 with a bunch of very fine people. I had a great time, and I got to meet a lot of terrific people and visit with friends I hadn’t seen in forever. There’s never enough time, but I was glad to grab what I could. While there were a few problems (first time in this venue), overall it was really fun and I enjoyed myself. I will say I’ve never been in such a terrific green room, with a lot of healthy foods available throughout the day and into the evening. The art show was terrific, and the dealer room had a lot of variety, although it was sort of in a corner, which was unfortunate. I was delighted because I did a lot of walking and stairs and so got some exercise.

But my favorite thing was the little statue I got at the art show. There’s this little play written by Kelly McCullough that I love. It makes me laugh and I promise you will too.  Here’s the link. You need to go read it. Seriously. Go. I’ll wait.

Back?

Now for what I bought at the show. Read his chest:

 

This is MY inspiration fairy. He bears a strong resemblance to WC Fields and I adore him. He shall inspire and probably motivate. Discipline can go off to ballet class for gorillas now.

Do you like him?

 

Share

Source: http://ift.tt/1eIlTf1

The Inspiration Fairy

This last weekend I attended Orycon 39 with a bunch of very fine people. I had a great time, and I got to meet a lot of terrific people and visit with friends I hadn’t seen in forever. There’s never enough time, but I was glad to grab what I could. While there were a few problems (first time in this venue), overall it was really fun and I enjoyed myself. I will say I’ve never been in such a terrific green room, with a lot of healthy foods available throughout the day and into the evening. The art show was terrific, and the dealer room had a lot of variety, although it was sort of in a corner, which was unfortunate. I was delighted because I did a lot of walking and stairs and so got some exercise.

But my favorite thing was the little statue I got at the art show. There’s this little play written by Kelly McCullough that I love. It makes me laugh and I promise you will too.  Here’s the link. You need to go read it. Seriously. Go. I’ll wait.

Back?

Now for what I bought at the show. Read his chest:

 

This is MY inspiration fairy. He bears a strong resemblance to WC Fields and I adore him. He shall inspire and probably motivate. Discipline can go off to ballet class for gorillas now.

Do you like him?

 

Share

Source: http://ift.tt/1eIlTf1

The Reluctant Traveler’s Thanksgiving Rant

Could a computer run the United States?

Let’s suppose we’re not that far off from this. I probably won’t be alive and neither will Donald Trump (fortunately) but it could happen. (Consider WestWorld—or is it Disney World?) Today’s political arena is a lot like a Disney ride.

I ask you, would we feel any more insecure that we do now if a computer were president?

I imagine she would be a bit of a mix between the Wizard of Oz with an intimidating and emphatic speaking interface and a hologram. Depending on the political or diplomatic tangle at hand, she would assume any number of personae—mainly the hologram so she could shake hands with world leaders.

That would be pretty cool. Life is messy. No one has a cure for that. Imagining one is the road to insanity. But anything is better than what we have now.

Except there are people who think what we have now is better already. Let’s not go down that road. Maybe I should just write about the Thanksgiving holiday. Are you all doing a turkey?

I get this question a lot in the days before this holiday, a day that I always thought ended uncomfortably. Turkey is ok. Pumpkin pie is meh, cranberries not my favorite berry, and stuffing tastes like thick, mucky, well, let’s just say I don’t care for it much.

The every day information feed is a lot like the big feast. It smells so good, and the finding/making of it an exciting game, but after the bones are picked and the crumbs dusted up, it’s just heartburn and sleeplessness and guilt. It’s interesting that information we get is called a “feed”. Do you feel a little like a chicken in a cage?

Often my friends and I, comfortable or rather uncomfortable in our blue silos on the West Coast, speak of PTSD symptomology post the 2016 election. It’s a lot like consuming an apple fritter, tiramisu and a bowl of fettuccini Alfredo all in one sitting. The lead-up to the election was the both the expectation of the delicious, but tasting the delicious as well. However after such a meal, one’s digestive system is never the same again.

That’s why I think we should elect a robot for president. Again, I ask, how could it get any worse than what we have now? Nothing is foolproof, especially humans, but computers can be repaired if they send out an offensive tweet. Computers can also be hacked, but they can be re-programmed. Changing the opinions of a self-entitled, narcissistic, misogynistic – do I need to complete my thought or do you get it?

Happy Thanksgiving.

End of line.

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The Reluctant Traveler’s Thanksgiving Rant

Could a computer run the United States?

Let’s suppose we’re not that far off from this. I probably won’t be alive and neither will Donald Trump (fortunately) but it could happen. (Consider WestWorld—or is it Disney World?) Today’s political arena is a lot like a Disney ride.

I ask you, would we feel any more insecure that we do now if a computer were president?

I imagine she would be a bit of a mix between the Wizard of Oz with an intimidating and emphatic speaking interface and a hologram. Depending on the political or diplomatic tangle at hand, she would assume any number of personae—mainly the hologram so she could shake hands with world leaders.

That would be pretty cool. Life is messy. No one has a cure for that. Imagining one is the road to insanity. But anything is better than what we have now.

Except there are people who think what we have now is better already. Let’s not go down that road. Maybe I should just write about the Thanksgiving holiday. Are you all doing a turkey?

I get this question a lot in the days before this holiday, a day that I always thought ended uncomfortably. Turkey is ok. Pumpkin pie is meh, cranberries not my favorite berry, and stuffing tastes like thick, mucky, well, let’s just say I don’t care for it much.

The every day information feed is a lot like the big feast. It smells so good, and the finding/making of it an exciting game, but after the bones are picked and the crumbs dusted up, it’s just heartburn and sleeplessness and guilt. It’s interesting that information we get is called a “feed”. Do you feel a little like a chicken in a cage?

Often my friends and I, comfortable or rather uncomfortable in our blue silos on the West Coast, speak of PTSD symptomology post the 2016 election. It’s a lot like consuming an apple fritter, tiramisu and a bowl of fettuccini Alfredo all in one sitting. The lead-up to the election was the both the expectation of the delicious, but tasting the delicious as well. However after such a meal, one’s digestive system is never the same again.

That’s why I think we should elect a robot for president. Again, I ask, how could it get any worse than what we have now? Nothing is foolproof, especially humans, but computers can be repaired if they send out an offensive tweet. Computers can also be hacked, but they can be re-programmed. Changing the opinions of a self-entitled, narcissistic, misogynistic – do I need to complete my thought or do you get it?

Happy Thanksgiving.

End of line.

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Theatre review: Escape to Margaritaville

 

 

Wednesday night I was privileged to attend the press opening for the new Jimmy Buffett musical, “Escape to Margaritaville” at the Oriental Theatre in Chicago. It was a total hoot.

I’d been wondering how they were going to use Buffett’s existing songs in the story, and even more curious about new songs he’s written for the show.

I got totally sucked in. Of course, it’s mid-November in Chicago, when every day that it doesn’t snow we dance naked in the streets. A play set on an island where there’s one boat a week and you’re stuck with frosty rum drinks, sand, sun, and a lot of lovely scenery? Sign me up. I was a huge fan of Charlie’s Angels back in the day, because Hawaii.

There are three couples, which always tickles my romcom farce craving:

The resort owner, an older woman who turned her beachfront bar into a hotel because “people were sleeping here anyway, they might as well pay,” and her oldest regular barfly

An uptight soil scientist doing research on volcanic soil for her eco-friendly research project and the slacker who plays guitar and sings in the resort bar

A decidedly saftig bride-to-be, best friends with the soil scientist, enjoying a prolonged bachelorette party, and the resort bartender who reluctantly steals her heart

If air time means anything, the focus is supposed to be on the hot guitar slacker and the uptight soil scientist, but in my opinion the bride steals the show. Her fiance, by no means svelte himself, has the brass balls to order her wedding dress a size too small, “so that you’ll be motivated to be all you can be on our big day.” The bride goes quickly from starving herself on three ounces of carrot juice and twenty sunflower seeds every four hours to morning umbrella drinks and tropical pleasures. She also finds the bartender tempting. He’s just as slack as his guitar-playing buddy but draws the line at bedding the bride before her wedding to another. The bride is way too much fun to be engaged to that dope. We all cheered every time she went to the bad.

Anyway, plotty plot plot, silly numbers where the story is woven hilariously into the weirdest lines of classic Buffett lyrics, an active volcano and the forty-three zombie insurance salesmen who didn’t run fast enough last time it erupted, and a nicely diverse supporting cast and chorus. I especially love that the bride is not the only plus-size woman on the stage.

In fact, in its slack, umbrella-drink-holding way, Margaritaville is body-image-positive, feminist, and egalitarian in its relationship developments. For you romance readers, the romance values are adult-level, in spite of the Parrothead themes. All the character arcs have twists I didn’t see coming. (As well as a few I did. Spoiler alert: the bride is seduced, no surprise . . . but via cheeseburger.)

This is a “production” show, meaning, the world premiere of the musical. You only have until December 2 to see it on this run, after which it will close in Chicago and simmer awhile before you can see it in New York in mid-February. I predict a long and happy tour life for “Escape to Margaritaville” as well.

“Escape to Margaritaville”
Music and lyrics by Jimmy Buffett
Original story by Greg Garcia and Mike O’Malley
Directed by Christopher Ashley
Oriental Theatre
24 W Randolph Street, Chicago IL
(312) 977-1700
Box office online

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NOT NOW NOT EVER by Lily Anderson

 

Lily Anderson first came to my attention with her debut book, The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You, a hilariously witty young adult novel about smart kids at a smart school that used as its substrate Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing.

So when the chance came along to read a preview copy of her second book, Not Now Not Ever, I grabbed it. What Shakespearean play would she riff off of this time?

Not Shakespeare, but one of my favorite plays of all time, The Importance Of Being Earnest–combined with summer camp for smart kids.

I loved Not Now Not Ever even more.

This romantic young adult novel features high school age kids the summer before senior year of high school. Elliott has sneakily signed up for a summer camp for smart nerds, given at a college that has a famous science fiction section.

Her mother expects her to stay with family tradition and go into the military; her step-mother, who loves Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, and lawyer father are horrified at the idea and want her to stay close.

So she runs away . . . to summer camp for smart kids, and changes her name to Ever Lawrence. But she discovers to her horror that her incredibly annoying cousin Isaiah, who is not even sixteen, also got in. The two of them pretend to be twins, so that Isaiah won’t get booted out, their decision more of a truce, or mutual blackmail, than friendship.

The camp is run by college-age counselors, and it’s mostly based on mountains of trivia in a lot of subjects, but surprisingly enough, not math. There’s a reason for that, and a mystery, and a beautifully developed romance, and some very sharply realized emotional growing up, which often times smart kids don’t have to do, because they intimidate (or fog) everyone around them.

It’s funny, full of great characters; Anderson understands smart kids and their warts as well as their great qualities. The mystery gets solved, and Elliott has to make some hard decisions.

The terrific voice, the great pace, the heartfelt moments as well as the fun made me reach out when the opportunity came alone to interview the author for her book blog tour previous to the publication of the book in three days.

  1. What were your formative books as a kid reader?

My dad read me classics as bed time stories, so growing up I adored Mark Twain and Robert Louis Stevenson and Roald Dahl. When I started reading things that weren’t by dead white guys, I fell in love with Sharon Creech, Gail Carson Levine, Gary Soto, Karen Cushman, Virginia Hamilton, and, duh, JK Rowling. I think that BLOOMABILITY by Sharon Creech might be the book that influenced my writing the most.

  1. What made you decide to riff off Shakespeare’s plays?

I love Shakespeare and I love his work, but retellings tend to stick to the most famous works—Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and maybe a Macbeth. My favorite Shakespeare play is Much Ado About Nothing and I couldn’t find a retelling of it, so I wrote one. Starting to write NOT NOW, NOT EVER was the same process.

I knew I wanted to use a play that I knew very well, but not one that had been done too many times, so I chose Oscar Wilde’s The Importance Of Being Earnest.

  1. Talk about your engagement with Shakespeare. How early did you discover his plays, and how have they shaped your writing?

Shakespeare has always been a part of my life. My dad had an illustrated Complete Works that I remember flipping through when I was really little, examining the pictures.

I bought a copy of Romeo And Juliet out of a Scholastic book order when I was in the fifth grade (I still own that copy). The following year, my youth theater put on a production of Comedy Of Errors where I was taught how to really dissect and appreciate Shakespearean text.

The reason why people find Shakespeare inaccessible is because it’s 400 year old pop culture. In order to relate to the common people, Shakespeare was referencing things they all knew as a shortcut to their emotions.

So, when I’m writing a book I might refer to the Doctor and Rose on the beach or Finn grabbing Rey’s hand the same way Shakespeare referred to characters from Greek mythology or Virgil or Homer.

Those were my questions. She was asked some more general questions that I will include here:

 

  1. Who’s your favorite character in NOT NOW, NOT EVER?

Definitely Elliot. She’s so different than me—she’s sporty where I’m slothy and brave where I’m scared and into Sci-Fi where I’m into romance novels and musicals. I loved being in her head for the year I was writing the book.

  1. What is your writing process? Are you a pantser? (That would be especially interesting given the literary conversation with the plays). Outliner?

I’m an outliner and my outlines get more serious with every book. With NOT NOW, I outlined a three act structure which was basically “Elliot runs away. Elliot is at camp. Camp is really hard.” If I were outlining the same story now, it would have a chapter by chapter breakdown with character beats.

  1. Please give the elevator pitch for Not Now, Not Ever.

Using The Importance Of Being Earnest as a guide, Elliot Gabaroche runs away from home to compete for a college scholarship.

  1. Without spoilers, what was your favorite scene to write?

Any scene that happens in the Mo-Lo library. As a librarian, I took particular joy in creating a giant fantastical library of my dreams (and putting some swoon inside).

  1. What do you most hope that readers take away from your novels (either or both)?

I want all my readers to take away a sense of happiness. NOT NOW, NOT EVER and its predecessor, THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU, are fluff. Hopefully well crafted, artisanal and organic fluff but fluff nonetheless.

NOT NOW is very much a story about choosing a path, but also realizing that the paths don’t close behind you. I want my readers to have hope for Elliot’s path and their own.

  1. What is next?

My next book, UNDEAD GIRL GANG, comes out from Penguin Razorbill on May 8, 2018! It’s Veronica Mars meets The Craft in the fat Wiccan Latina book I’ve always wanted to write.

  1. Do you have a dream cast for if there was ever a movie version of NOT NOW, NOT EVER?

In four or five years, I think that Marsai Martin (Diane from Blackish) and Finn Wolfhard (Mike from Stranger Things) would be a perfect Elliot and Brandon. Wendell Cheeseman, the professor in charge of Camp Onward, was written with Paul Scheer  (from my all-time favorite podcast, How Did This Get Made, and TV shows like Fresh Off The Boat and The League) in mind.

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