That feeling when you KNOW you need to get off your phone & go to bed but you can’t tear yourself away & keep checking social media even though you know it’s BAD & you need to stop but the force is way to strong. Nooooooooo 😩🤣

Beyond Sexual Harassment

Women & PowerThe problems created by the frat bro rules found in so many aspects of our society go much farther than the recent documented episodes of sexual harassment and abuse and even much farther than the effect those specific actions had on some women’s lives and careers. The men guilty of those behaviors and the many other men who go along with them even if they don’t personally do such things share a contempt for women’s ambition and a lack of respect for women’s abilities – even, or perhaps especially, when the women in question are the smartest people in the room.

Jill Filipovic pointed this out in a powerful New York Times op-ed in which she reported that many of the men in the news media who have been accused of various kinds of sexual harassment were the ones who pilloried Hillary Clinton. Filipovic writes:

A pervasive theme of all of these men’s coverage of Mrs. Clinton was that she was dishonest and unlikable. These recent harassment allegations suggest that perhaps the problem wasn’t that Mrs. Clinton was untruthful or inherently hard to connect with, but that these particular men hold deep biases against women who seek power instead of sticking to acquiescent sex-object status.

In other words, no matter what women do and regardless of whether sexual misconduct is involved, a lot of men – and particularly a lot of powerful men – won’t like them, support them, or give them opportunities. And they’ll call them names, to boot.

The sexual nature of the current crop of scandals makes it easy to miss that underlying problem: Men, particularly powerful men, do a lot of things to interfere with women’s efforts to fulfill their ambitions.

Sexual harassment and assault are just some of the tools such men use. If a woman meets the test of fuckability, she gets the sex object treatment. If she doesn’t, she might get sex-related harassment anyway, based on the idea that no “real” man would have her.

But labeling a woman unlikeable, aggressive, or not a “team player” – that is, using the polite words for calling her a bitch – can torpedo a woman’s career (or her life) in much the same way. And it can be done behind the screen of “I’m fine with women in power; I just don’t like this one.” The fact that they don’t like any powerful women never gets thrown back at them, because they make these statements at different times.

And, of course, some people are unlikeable. Some really don’t know how to work well with others. Some are so aggressive they step on other people all the way to the top. In my experience, most of these people are men, but a few women do fall into that category.

Then there’s that damn reality that no matter what women do, they aren’t doing it right. Push for what you want and you aren’t “feminine.” Be modest about your accomplishments and be overlooked or seen as wimpy. Be firm when you ask for a raise, or you won’t get it. But not too firm, or you won’t get it because you’re pushy and “won’t wait your turn.” It’s always pushed back on women, and all the choices are always wrong.

This series of scandals is not about sex. It’s never been about sex, even if the men who do these things get sexual gratification from it. The sex just provides the creepy, sensationalist side that gets it heard.

It’s about power. The men who do these things – whether they pull out their penises or label a woman unlikeable – are planning to keep their realm a boys’ club.

It’s time we stopped them. Figuring out how to do that is going to be hard. I can teach you physical self defense and how to convey a strong presence in the world – important steps in this process – but I haven’t figured out how to keep men from rejecting you because of that strong presence.

Mary Beard’s delightful short collection of two speeches she’s given – Women & Power: a Manifesto – traces the history of silencing women who speak out back to antiquity. (Here’s a great review of Beard’s book by Julie Phillips. ) The various compromises women have made – from learning to speak in a lower voice to adopting the ubiquitous pantsuits (practical attire, but boring) – have only done so much to change it. We don’t know what a woman in authority looks like.

It’s way past time we found out.

I have an idea, just now taking shape in my mind: Let’s follow women, rather than men. Let’s vote for women, even if we don’t think they’re “perfect” (especially when their opponents are even more imperfect), read books by women, go to lectures by women, seek advice from women. Make choosing a man, or a work by a man, the exception rather than the rule. Men should join us in doing this.

I note that some people have done this with authors, but I’d like to see us go much farther than that.

Yes, women don’t have as much power as the problem men we’re talking about. In many cases they can’t give you the job you need, or even the right reference for the job you need. But strength in numbers is valuable. Following women leaders may not get us everything we need, but it’s a good place to start.

I’ll end with a quote from Jessica Valenti’s memoir Sex Object:

Who would I be if I didn’t live in a world that hated women?

The answer? I don’t know. I don’t think any of us know. But I really want to find out.

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30 Minutes on: “As Good As it Gets”

Thumb as good as it gets

"As Good As it Gets" was on cable TV tonight and I watched it all the way through while doing other things. I think that’s how it was meant to be watched, like really good but not particularly ambitious television. It’s about a millionaire writer with obsessive-compulsive disorder (Jack Nicholson) who falls for a coffee shop waitress (Helen Hunt) whose cute son has asthma and somehow ends up taking care of an adorable little dog that belongs to a gay painter (Greg Kinnear) after the painter gets savagely beaten. I remember being pretty tough on the film when it came out—I was in my late 20s and had only lived in New York for two years after emigrating from Texas, so maybe I was trying to seem more hardbitten and urban—but the first thought that came into my head during tonight’s re-watch was, "I can’t believe there was a time when a movie like this could make $314 million in North America."

Written and directed by James L. Brooks ("Terms of Endearment," "Broadcast News," "Spanglish"), the movie is comprised mainly of scenes where people talk to each other. None of these characters are particularly striking individuals (except for Nicholson’s Melvin Udall, who makes a vivid impression mainly because he’s such a cranky a-hole at every waking moment), and while they all have their personal crosses to bear, none of them has a problem that you would call extraordinary. They live in something vaguely like reality (though the apartments are way bigger than people at these income levels could afford, except for Melvin—but when is that not true of New York movies?). Features like this don’t find their way into theaters very often anymore unless they’re funded by Netflix or Amazon and the theatrical release is a formality and a transparent bid at Oscar recognition, or if they’re in French with English subtitles and play on four screens. Or if they’re a television show.

And increasingly, that’s what stories like this have to be if they want to find funding and an audience: television shows. Somewhere during the last twenty years, the motion picture distributors and exhibitors successfully trained audiences not to want to leave their homes unless they’re seeing a "Star Wars" or superhero movie, a film where giant robots or giant monsters wreck things, one one of those little horror movies or comedies (like "Don’t Breathe" or "Get Out" or "Girls Trip") that somehow manages to connect with the zeitgeist anyway and make a bazillion dollars. I love television and write about it all the time, but I still think it’s a shame that, by and large, people won’t leave their homes for films like this anymore unless there’s a wild-card genre element stirred into the mix. But if you have a really nice TV and don’t want to pay for parking and/or a babysitter, I get it, believe me.

"As Good as It Gets" is very likable despite being too long and misshapen. I know it’s a standard knock on writer-director James L. Brooks to say that he makes excellent sitcoms for the big screen, but this one really does feel like five sitcom episodes smooshed together; each discrete section of the story runs about 30 minutes, and there’s even a very special "road trip" episode that sends the three main characters to Baltimore when they barely know each other. There are epiphanies and revelations and moments where people come to terms with their demons, or think about doing so. Melvin and Carol are twenty years apart in age, and physically she’s way more attractive than he is, but you believe that they might eventually end up together because Melvin is played by Jack Nicholson and the character is loaded and she desperately needs medical care for her son.

Sorry to be cynical about it, but there’s not much going on at the chemistry and character levels between these two: you know why he likes her, but it’s hard to say why she likes him when all he does is insult people, complain, and sometimes mope, plus he’s casually homophobic in a way that read as merely "blunt" or "politically incorrect" in 1997 (to certain straight viewers, anyway) but that would seem like deal-breakers to anybody who was thinking about being pals with Melvin in 2017. No, I’m not saying every character in a film has to be likable, so don’t come at me with that, please; I’m saying there are some unexamined assumptions at the heart of the idea that this guy is "relatable" to everyone and that Kinnear’s character, Simon Bishop—who must spend quite a bit of time in art galleries and hanging around bohemian people if he’s a successful painter, would cut him so much slack—probably wouldn’t put up with him to the extent that he does here, especially if he’d just recovered from a beating that put stitches in his face. There was probably a way to make all of this entirely comprehensible without waving that magic "Jack Nicholson, he’s so wacky!" wand (which admittedly worked like gangbusters for about two straight decades), but Brooks never gets there. Not that audiences cared. Or the Academy, which gave the film seven nominations and two awards, for Nicholson and Hunt.

There are some marvelous, highly quotable lines, though, including "You make me want to be a better man" and "You’re a disgrace to depression" and "I’m drowning here, and you’re describing the water!" And there’s that aforementioned nostalgia factor, for the days when this kind of project could be considered a "major release" during the holiday season even though it takes its sweet time exploring the world and defining the characters, and tries to generate suspense from scenes where the main character tries to walk down the street without stepping on any cracks, and succeeds. There are four compelling lead performances in this film, and one of them is by a dog. Respect.

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Beyond Sexual Harassment

Women & PowerThe problems created by the frat bro rules found in so many aspects of our society go much farther than the recent documented episodes of sexual harassment and abuse and even much farther than the effect those specific actions had on some women’s lives and careers. The men guilty of those behaviors and the many other men who go along with them even if they don’t personally do such things share a contempt for women’s ambition and a lack of respect for women’s abilities – even, or perhaps especially, when the women in question are the smartest people in the room.

Jill Filipovic pointed this out in a powerful New York Times op-ed in which she reported that many of the men in the news media who have been accused of various kinds of sexual harassment were the ones who pilloried Hillary Clinton. Filipovic writes:

A pervasive theme of all of these men’s coverage of Mrs. Clinton was that she was dishonest and unlikable. These recent harassment allegations suggest that perhaps the problem wasn’t that Mrs. Clinton was untruthful or inherently hard to connect with, but that these particular men hold deep biases against women who seek power instead of sticking to acquiescent sex-object status.

In other words, no matter what women do and regardless of whether sexual misconduct is involved, a lot of men – and particularly a lot of powerful men – won’t like them, support them, or give them opportunities. And they’ll call them names, to boot.

The sexual nature of the current crop of scandals makes it easy to miss that underlying problem: Men, particularly powerful men, do a lot of things to interfere with women’s efforts to fulfill their ambitions.

Sexual harassment and assault are just some of the tools such men use. If a woman meets the test of fuckability, she gets the sex object treatment. If she doesn’t, she might get sex-related harassment anyway, based on the idea that no “real” man would have her.

But labeling a woman unlikeable, aggressive, or not a “team player” – that is, using the polite words for calling her a bitch – can torpedo a woman’s career (or her life) in much the same way. And it can be done behind the screen of “I’m fine with women in power; I just don’t like this one.” The fact that they don’t like any powerful women never gets thrown back at them, because they make these statements at different times.

And, of course, some people are unlikeable. Some really don’t know how to work well with others. Some are so aggressive they step on other people all the way to the top. In my experience, most of these people are men, but a few women do fall into that category.

Then there’s that damn reality that no matter what women do, they aren’t doing it right. Push for what you want and you aren’t “feminine.” Be modest about your accomplishments and be overlooked or seen as wimpy. Be firm when you ask for a raise, or you won’t get it. But not too firm, or you won’t get it because you’re pushy and “won’t wait your turn.” It’s always pushed back on women, and all the choices are always wrong.

This series of scandals is not about sex. It’s never been about sex, even if the men who do these things get sexual gratification from it. The sex just provides the creepy, sensationalist side that gets it heard.

It’s about power. The men who do these things – whether they pull out their penises or label a woman unlikeable – are planning to keep their realm a boys’ club.

It’s time we stopped them. Figuring out how to do that is going to be hard. I can teach you physical self defense and how to convey a strong presence in the world – important steps in this process – but I haven’t figured out how to keep men from rejecting you because of that strong presence.

Mary Beard’s delightful short collection of two speeches she’s given – Women & Power: a Manifesto – traces the history of silencing women who speak out back to antiquity. (Here’s a great review of Beard’s book by Julie Phillips. ) The various compromises women have made – from learning to speak in a lower voice to adopting the ubiquitous pantsuits (practical attire, but boring) – have only done so much to change it. We don’t know what a woman in authority looks like.

It’s way past time we found out.

I have an idea, just now taking shape in my mind: Let’s follow women, rather than men. Let’s vote for women, even if we don’t think they’re “perfect” (especially when their opponents are even more imperfect), read books by women, go to lectures by women, seek advice from women. Make choosing a man, or a work by a man, the exception rather than the rule. Men should join us in doing this.

I note that some people have done this with authors, but I’d like to see us go much farther than that.

Yes, women don’t have as much power as the problem men we’re talking about. In many cases they can’t give you the job you need, or even the right reference for the job you need. But strength in numbers is valuable. Following women leaders may not get us everything we need, but it’s a good place to start.

I’ll end with a quote from Jessica Valenti’s memoir Sex Object:

Who would I be if I didn’t live in a world that hated women?

The answer? I don’t know. I don’t think any of us know. But I really want to find out.

Share

Source: http://ift.tt/1eIlTf1

‘Mr. Robot’ Season Three Ends With Elliot Trying To ‘Shutdown’ Whiterose

USA

A review of the Mr. Robot season finale coming up just as soon as I finish my book…

For a series with a fairly labyrinthine plot, Mr. Robot has taken an interesting approach to dealing with story arcs at the end of each season. The season one finale focused almost entirely on the war inside Elliot’s mind, with the hack and several other major plot points occurring during one of his blackouts. The season two finale, meanwhile, was more focused on the narrative, but its revelations wound up feeling anti-climactic, in part because the part of the show driven by mysteries and twists had run out of steam.

There are two developments in “Shutdown” that could be looked at as surprises — that Price is Angela’s biological father, and that Elliot fell out the window during a fit, rather than being pushed by Mr. Alderson — but the show was always ambiguous about both. You could have read Price’s interest in Angela as sexual in nature, but he never really pushed himself on her in that way, and Elliot has long been an unreliable narrator of his own story, so his dissociative identity disorder could have manifested itself that early. Neither revelation felt as seismic as Elliot realizing what Mr. Robot really was, or even Elliot being in prison for the first half of season two, but they also weren’t meant to. They were character moments first and foremost, not story moments, and season three was generally at its best either when the emphasis was on people over plot, or when we and Elliot understood most of what was happening, rather than fumbling around in the dark.

“Shutdown” mostly played things straight, other than continuing to conceal the mystery of Whiterose’s master plan. It was far from the season’s most thrilling hour — a good chunk of it involved people sitting around in a barn — and on the whole felt like a way to reset the plot, Christopher Reeve Superman-style, before the next phase of the series involves Elliot going directly after Whiterose, Price, etc. But it was emotionally satisfying, particularly in one moment involving Dom, and another involving Elliot.

Santiago working for Whiterose has never been particularly elegant in either concept or execution, and he’s been a walking plot device like many a 24 mole. But the scene where Irving hacks Santiago to pieces with an axe while threatening every member of Dom’s family to explain why she’ll now work for the Dark Army was incredibly chilling, thanks to the performances of both Grace Gummer and Bobby Cannavale. He’s simultaneously casual and frenzied, while she’s devastated to realize the risk that she and everyone she cares about are now in, and how her life as she always saw it is now over. Now when we deal with Whiterose having an FBI mole, it’ll feel like it matters, because Dom is a character the show has built from the ground up, and also one with a motivation to fight back rather than roll over forever.

And the season’s final scene (not counting the traditional mid-credits oner, which I’ll get to in a moment), with Elliot preparing to undo the Five/Nine hack, was a potent reminder that, hey, Rami Malek is really great at this acting thing (just look at the unguarded hope in his eyes), and such a powerful asset that the show doesn’t always need fancy camera or story tricks to make its point, so long as he’s somewhere in the frame. The season as a whole added up to less than it seemed at times, particularly in how it kept Elliot and Mr. Robot apart for so long, but I was deeply engaged by a lot of it, thanks to the more confident and open storytelling, and thanks to that guy in the hoodie.

A few other thoughts:

* The mid-credits scene not only allows the show to point out the many downsides to Elliot undoing the hack and restoring everyone’s debt, it brings Fernando Vera, the drug dealer who caused Elliot so much trouble (including murdering Shayla) early in season one. It feels like the story has largely evolved beyond a guy this small-time, but Esmail obviously has a plan for him. We’ll find out what next year.

* Vera returns, but is Irving gone for good? His last scene with Grant certainly played with the subtext of Very Special Guest Star Bobby Cannavale saying, “This was fun and all, guys, but I’ve got to start developing another show where I play the lead.” If this is, indeed, it, I will miss this memorably twitchy performance and that hair/mustache combo.

What did everybody else think?

Alan Sepinwall may be reached at sepinwall@uproxx.com. He discusses television weekly on the TV Avalanche podcast. His new book, Breaking Bad 101, is on sale now.

Source: http://uproxx.com

15 Quotes on Self-Love and Acceptance That Will Change Your Life

You’re reading 15 Quotes on Self-Love and Acceptance That Will Change Your Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you’re enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

Do you know that self-love can literally save your life?
It did for the famous entrepreneur and bestselling Author, Kamal Ravikant who was about to kill himself when he discovered a way out of depression through accepting and loving himself. Self-love has also given Khalil Rafati a way out and helped him move out from being a homeless crack addict to one of America`s most respected multimillionaires.
Self-love can help you regain confidence, express life fully and take a swing at setbacks or any major failure you may have suffered from. In other words, it will help you be calm, be collected, and be the solution to your own life. But only if you’re motivated enough to do it.
For that, I`ve made you a list of 15 self-love quotes that you must read. Write them down or print them out and keep them in front of you always and forever. They can really change your life.
On what it means to have self-love“
1- Loving yourself…does not mean being self-absorbed or narcissistic, or disregarding others. Rather it means welcoming yourself as the most honored guest in your own heart, a guest worthy of respect, a lovable companion.” – Margot Anand
On being the only way to becoming authentic
2- “I think the most important thing in life is self-love, because if you don’t have self-love, and respect for everything about your own body, your own soul, your own capsule, then how can you have an authentic relationship with anyone else?” – Shailene Woodley
On being treated fairly
3- “Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life, but define yourself.” – Harvey Fierstein
4- “Life is too short to waste any amount of time on wondering what other people think about you. In the first place, if they had better things going on in their lives, they wouldn’t have the time to sit around and talk about you. What’s important to me is not others’ opinions of me, but what’s important to me is my opinion of myself.”  ― C. JoyBell C.
On the difference between self and romantic love
5- “A lot of times, in our culture and our society, we put romantic love somehow on a higher plane than self-love and friendship love. You can’t do that. You have to honor and really fully invest in all these different loving relationships.” – Delilah
6- “The principle we call self-love never seeks anything external for the sake of the thing, but only as a means of happiness or good: particular affections rest in the external things themselves.” – Joseph Butler
On being your own best friend
7- “When you are your own best friend, you don’t endlessly seek out relationships, friendships, and validation from the wrong sources because you realize that the only approval and validation you need is your own.” – Mandy Hale
8- “You’re always with yourself, so you might as well enjoy the company.” – Diane Von Furstenberg
On why you should love yourself first
9- “If you aren’t good at loving yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone, since you’ll resent the time and energy you give another person that you aren’t even giving to yourself.” – Barbara De Angelis
10- “Self-love is really a foundation for everything, and however you practice or express that is so, so important.” – Solange Knowles
11- “Find the love you seek, by first finding the love within yourself. Learn to rest in that place within you that is your true home.” – Sri Sri Ravi Shankar
On what makes someone beautiful
12- “The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassions, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.” – Elizabeth Kubler-Ross
On knowing your true value
13- “If only you could sense how important you are to the lives of those you meet; how important you can be to people you may never even dream of. There is something of yourself that you leave at every meeting with another person.” – Fred Rogers
14- “A healthy self-love means we have no compulsion to justify to ourselves or others why we take vacations, why we sleep late, why we buy new shoes, why we spoil ourselves from time to time. We feel comfortable doing things which add quality and beauty to life.” – Andrew Matthews
And finally,
15- “Love yourself first and everything else falls into line. You really have to love yourself to get anything done in this world.” – Lucille Ball
Rum Tan is a passionate entrepreneur. He is currently active managing the largest home tuition agency in Singapore, Smile Tutor which provides top-notch tuition job opportunities for part-time and full-time private tutors. Part-time and full-time school teachers can also find tutoring jobs easily through its innovative job board.

You’ve read 15 Quotes on Self-Love and Acceptance That Will Change Your Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you’ve enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

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‘Mr. Robot’ Season Three Ends With Elliot Trying To ‘Shutdown’ Whiterose

USA

A review of the Mr. Robot season finale coming up just as soon as I finish my book…

For a series with a fairly labyrinthine plot, Mr. Robot has taken an interesting approach to dealing with story arcs at the end of each season. The season one finale focused almost entirely on the war inside Elliot’s mind, with the hack and several other major plot points occurring during one of his blackouts. The season two finale, meanwhile, was more focused on the narrative, but its revelations wound up feeling anti-climactic, in part because the part of the show driven by mysteries and twists had run out of steam.

There are two developments in “Shutdown” that could be looked at as surprises — that Price is Angela’s biological father, and that Elliot fell out the window during a fit, rather than being pushed by Mr. Alderson — but the show was always ambiguous about both. You could have read Price’s interest in Angela as sexual in nature, but he never really pushed himself on her in that way, and Elliot has long been an unreliable narrator of his own story, so his dissociative identity disorder could have manifested itself that early. Neither revelation felt as seismic as Elliot realizing what Mr. Robot really was, or even Elliot being in prison for the first half of season two, but they also weren’t meant to. They were character moments first and foremost, not story moments, and season three was generally at its best either when the emphasis was on people over plot, or when we and Elliot understood most of what was happening, rather than fumbling around in the dark.

“Shutdown” mostly played things straight, other than continuing to conceal the mystery of Whiterose’s master plan. It was far from the season’s most thrilling hour — a good chunk of it involved people sitting around in a barn — and on the whole felt like a way to reset the plot, Christopher Reeve Superman-style, before the next phase of the series involves Elliot going directly after Whiterose, Price, etc. But it was emotionally satisfying, particularly in one moment involving Dom, and another involving Elliot.

Santiago working for Whiterose has never been particularly elegant in either concept or execution, and he’s been a walking plot device like many a 24 mole. But the scene where Irving hacks Santiago to pieces with an axe while threatening every member of Dom’s family to explain why she’ll now work for the Dark Army was incredibly chilling, thanks to the performances of both Grace Gummer and Bobby Cannavale. He’s simultaneously casual and frenzied, while she’s devastated to realize the risk that she and everyone she cares about are now in, and how her life as she always saw it is now over. Now when we deal with Whiterose having an FBI mole, it’ll feel like it matters, because Dom is a character the show has built from the ground up, and also one with a motivation to fight back rather than roll over forever.

And the season’s final scene (not counting the traditional mid-credits oner, which I’ll get to in a moment), with Elliot preparing to undo the Five/Nine hack, was a potent reminder that, hey, Rami Malek is really great at this acting thing (just look at the unguarded hope in his eyes), and such a powerful asset that the show doesn’t always need fancy camera or story tricks to make its point, so long as he’s somewhere in the frame. The season as a whole added up to less than it seemed at times, particularly in how it kept Elliot and Mr. Robot apart for so long, but I was deeply engaged by a lot of it, thanks to the more confident and open storytelling, and thanks to that guy in the hoodie.

A few other thoughts:

* The mid-credits scene not only allows the show to point out the many downsides to Elliot undoing the hack and restoring everyone’s debt, it brings Fernando Vera, the drug dealer who caused Elliot so much trouble (including murdering Shayla) early in season one. It feels like the story has largely evolved beyond a guy this small-time, but Esmail obviously has a plan for him. We’ll find out what next year.

* Vera returns, but is Irving gone for good? His last scene with Grant certainly played with the subtext of Very Special Guest Star Bobby Cannavale saying, “This was fun and all, guys, but I’ve got to start developing another show where I play the lead.” If this is, indeed, it, I will miss this memorably twitchy performance and that hair/mustache combo.

What did everybody else think?

Alan Sepinwall may be reached at sepinwall@uproxx.com. He discusses television weekly on the TV Avalanche podcast. His new book, Breaking Bad 101, is on sale now.

Source: http://uproxx.com

The 20 Best Rap Albums of 2017

Of all the radical pivots in Chief Keef’s fascinating career, Thot Breaker is the most sublime. Full of his sweetest melodies and soothing tones, the mixtape exists as an affectionate outlier in an otherwise thorny catalog. When he isn’t wooing women, he’s having heart-to-heart talks about trust and friendship. He’s genteel, charming, and accessible, serenading side chicks and delighting in their companionship. “You don’t have to worry, girl, it’s just you and me,” he croons. But, for all its sentimentality, this isn’t a fantasy. Refusing to be mistaken for a romantic, Chief Keef luxuriates in messy relationships, seducing women away from their boyfriends and stewing in the chaos he’s caused. Even his softer side is mischievous.

Listen: Chief Keef, “Can You Be My Friend”

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