Official Trailer for Yance Ford’s Personal Documentary ‘Strong Island’

Strong Island Doc Trailer

"The police had turned my brother into the prime suspect in his own murder." Netflix has debuted the first official trailer for Yance Ford’s powerful, personal documentary Strong Island, which first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year. It won a Special Jury Prize for Storytelling there, and went on to play at numerous other festivals throughout the world. Strong Island is a unique documentary, where the story is not only being told by the filmmaker, but is about the filmmaker, who is expressing his anger and pent-up frustration about the murder of his brother. "A deeply intimate and meditative film, Strong Island asks what one can do when the grief of loss is entwined with historical injustice, and how one grapples with the complicity of silence, which can bind a family in an imitation of life, and a nation with a false sense of justice." If you’re a fan of innovative, challenging documentaries this is a must watch. Get a glimpse below.

Here’s the trailer (+ poster) for Yance Ford’s documentary Strong Island, direct from YouTube:

Strong Island Documentary Poster

In April 1992, on Long Island NY, William Jr., the Ford’s eldest child, a black 24 year-old teacher, was killed by Mark Reilly, a white 19 year-old mechanic. Although Ford was unarmed, he became the prime suspect in his own murder. Director Yance Ford chronicles the arc of his family across history, geography and tragedy – from the racial segregation of the Jim Crow South to the promise of New York City; from the presumed safety of middle class suburbs, to the maelstrom of an unexpected, violent death. It is the story of the Ford family: Barbara Dunmore, William Ford and their three children and how their lives were shaped by the enduring shadow of racism in America. Strong Island is directed by Yance Ford, a producer making his directorial debut. This first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and won a Special Jury Prize for Storytelling. Netflix opens Strong Island in select theaters + streaming on September 15th.

Source: http://ift.tt/g0Io3r

Official Trailer for Yance Ford’s Personal Documentary ‘Strong Island’

Strong Island Doc Trailer

"The police had turned my brother into the prime suspect in his own murder." Netflix has debuted the first official trailer for Yance Ford’s powerful, personal documentary Strong Island, which first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year. It won a Special Jury Prize for Storytelling there, and went on to play at numerous other festivals throughout the world. Strong Island is a unique documentary, where the story is not only being told by the filmmaker, but is about the filmmaker, who is expressing his anger and pent-up frustration about the murder of his brother. "A deeply intimate and meditative film, Strong Island asks what one can do when the grief of loss is entwined with historical injustice, and how one grapples with the complicity of silence, which can bind a family in an imitation of life, and a nation with a false sense of justice." If you’re a fan of innovative, challenging documentaries this is a must watch. Get a glimpse below.

Here’s the trailer (+ poster) for Yance Ford’s documentary Strong Island, direct from YouTube:

Strong Island Documentary Poster

In April 1992, on Long Island NY, William Jr., the Ford’s eldest child, a black 24 year-old teacher, was killed by Mark Reilly, a white 19 year-old mechanic. Although Ford was unarmed, he became the prime suspect in his own murder. Director Yance Ford chronicles the arc of his family across history, geography and tragedy – from the racial segregation of the Jim Crow South to the promise of New York City; from the presumed safety of middle class suburbs, to the maelstrom of an unexpected, violent death. It is the story of the Ford family: Barbara Dunmore, William Ford and their three children and how their lives were shaped by the enduring shadow of racism in America. Strong Island is directed by Yance Ford, a producer making his directorial debut. This first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and won a Special Jury Prize for Storytelling. Netflix opens Strong Island in select theaters + streaming on September 15th.

Source: http://ift.tt/g0Io3r

Tulip Fever Red Band Trailer #1 (2017) | Movieclips Trailers

Tulip Fever Red Band Trailer #1 (2017): Check out the new trailer starring Alicia Vikander, Cara Delevingne, and Dane DeHaan! Be the first to watch, comment, and share trailers and movie teasers/clips dropping soon @MovieclipsTrailers.  ► Buy Tickets to Tulip Fever: http://ift.tt/2pfcwOv Watch more Trailers: ► HOT New Trailers Playlist: http://bit.ly/2hp08G1 ► What to Watch Playlist: http://bit.ly/2ieyw8G ► Indie Trailers Playlist: http://bit.ly/1CWefqU An artist falls for a young married woman while he’s commissioned to paint her portrait during the Tulip mania of 17th century Amsterdam. About Movieclips Trailers: ► Subscribe to TRAILERS:http://bit.ly/sxaw6h ► We’re on SNAPCHAT: http://bit.ly/2cOzfcy  ► Like us on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/1QyRMsE  ► Follow us on TWITTER:http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt  The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers channel is your destination for hot new trailers the second they drop. The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers team is here day and night to make sure all the hottest new movie trailers are available whenever, wherever you want them.

Source: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=UUi8e0iOVk1fEOogdfu4YgfA

Tulip Fever Red Band Trailer #1 (2017) | Movieclips Trailers

Tulip Fever Red Band Trailer #1 (2017): Check out the new trailer starring Alicia Vikander, Cara Delevingne, and Dane DeHaan! Be the first to watch, comment, and share trailers and movie teasers/clips dropping soon @MovieclipsTrailers. 
► Buy Tickets to Tulip Fever: http://ift.tt/2pfcwOv
Watch more Trailers: ► HOT New Trailers Playlist: http://bit.ly/2hp08G1
► What to Watch Playlist: http://bit.ly/2ieyw8G
► Indie Trailers Playlist: http://bit.ly/1CWefqU
An artist falls for a young married woman while he’s commissioned to paint her portrait during the Tulip mania of 17th century Amsterdam.
About Movieclips Trailers:
► Subscribe to TRAILERS:http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
► We’re on SNAPCHAT: http://bit.ly/2cOzfcy 
► Like us on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/1QyRMsE 
► Follow us on TWITTER:http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt 
The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers channel is your destination for hot new trailers the second they drop. The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers team is here day and night to make sure all the hottest new movie trailers are available whenever, wherever you want them. Source: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi8e0iOVk1fEOogdfu4YgfA

Hosting Events is Becoming More Tolerable: The Best Geek Tools to Maintain Your Sanity While Event Planning

There is a popular (possibly false) story floating around that claims when British prime minister Harold McMillan took office in 1957 he was asked what he feared and responded “events, dear boy, events”. True or not, the story has hung around because the sentiment expressed resonates. As anyone in charge of organizing an event knows, the number of tasks which need taking care of between now and the date itself have a sneaky ability to spontaneously multiply.

Unfortunately, despite all the hassle, events are pretty important.  They afford new connections, time to get to know acquaintances, advertising opportunities, access to new information, and can be a generally good time.

So as technology companies do, a few startups have stepped up to the plate to try and help streamline event planning from start to finish. I picked my favorites for each stage of the event planning process and listed them below because let’s face it, no event organizer would turn down the opportunity to do the boring parts of event planning quicker and easier, so they can focus on the event itself, right?.

So let’s start at the beginning.

Decide what needs to happen

I find the first thing that makes itself known when organizing an event is the number of things that need doing, probably followed by the amount of time there is to do them. Especially if you need to work with other people. There are too many generic project management tools around (is there such thing as an anti-monopoly?) but Eventuosity is event-specific. Set up the roles for team leader, logistics, catering, etc – even if they are all you – and then get to work organizing each task as it’s broken up into manageable chunks. You can see how everyone’s getting on, track effectiveness, and even run multiple events at the same time if you’re really busy/mad.

Find suppliers

This is one of the most frustrating bits. You can have plenty of ideas but no idea whether there’s a supplier which will be able to help you execute those ideas. And what about all those weird suppliers you’ve seen people get, who can do really cool things – how did they find them? Eventerprise is your search engine for events. Catering, rental, venues, logistics, transport, the lot. Plug it all in, including any unique requests you might have, and send it off for quotes and the like. The platform looks like it’s trying to cover all bases, but someone should really test that. Maybe they’ll give out a prize for the weirdest idea.

Make sure everyone is having fun

Sounds really cheesy, but obviously the crux of the whole event. There’s nothing worse than only finding out afterward that it’s all gone terribly because something you didn’t know was a problem has become a problem. Or the moment when you unearth a problem halfway through wondering how long it’s been like that. Concierge Eventbot is a chatbot which allows attendees to get in touch in a variety of ways to get their questions answered. They can get access to all the event literature, information, and resources. Mostly it means you can relax (a little) knowing that if someone has a question or an issue, they won’t necessarily make themselves apparent. It’ll just be quietly dealt with. Plus you can send everyone alerts about things going on.

Translate event content

I chucked this one in because it shows event tech is going as far as to get niche. Plus, being a European, the idea of holding a single event with lots of people speaking lots of languages is a distinct reality. Interactio allows translators to project the translation of an event, to attendees through their personal phones. Attendees simply download an app, plug in their headphones and listen to the event. Having been the recipient on many occasions, of a cheap, old, dubiously functioning headset as I walk into an event, this seems ingenious to me. Why hasn’t anyone done this before? Even TED is using it.

Anyway, thus ends my little tour through event software. In short, the whole process is getting much easier, and will hopefully continue to do so. Now, go forth and create things. “Events, dear boy, events”

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Honest Retro TV Themes! w/ Michael Bolton & Friends

If you’re an Emmy voter do us a solid for vote for Honest Trailers for Outstanding Short Form Variety Series. Thanks to Michael Bolton, Brian McKnight, Paula Cole, and Natasha Bedingfield for helping to make this video extra epic. SONG LYRICS: 1) Stranger Things Something strange is happening here in Hawkinstown everything is turning upside down Our Will may be gone But our friendship’s still strong So turn this town up to Eleven And ride all night long Stranger Things Are keeping our lights shining Stranger Things These moments are defining No matter how hard we push and crawl… Stranger Things are inside us all 2) This Is Us Our lives cross in many ways And sometimes they’re sad Like losing a triplet Or your adopted dad what if your Mom lied to you your entire life That’s a lot of strife This is us! We’re not cuttin’ onions in here This is us! You’ll be crying buckets of tears This is us! Just accept that the end is near And someday we’ll all die Shanananaaaaaa 3) Handmaid’s Tale Waking up in my small bed Putting on my white n’ reds Life is good if you’re a male It’s just another handmaid’s tale I don’t want to wait For the men to take over I have worth not just to give birth I don’t want to wait For the guys to takeover Let the Eyes all see As we smash the patriarchy 4) Game of Thrones Our love burned like wildfire Until you blew it out Now my watch is ended The kingdoms are in doubt Winter is coming There’s a wall around my heart I’m a wolf in dragon’s clothing And it’s tearing me apart I see it in the flames Get ready for my reign Our love is not a game Of thrones Shame shame shame shame Shame on the game of thrones Got a tip? Email us ► feedback@screenjunkies.com Follow us on Twitter ► http://twitter.com/screenjunkies Like us on Facebook ► http://ift.tt/UPJSl5 Voiceover Narration by Jon Bailey: http://youtube.com/jon3pnt0 Title design by Robert Holtby Series Created by Andy Signore – http://twitter.com/andysignore & Brett Weiner Executive Producer – Andy Signore Producers – Dan Murrell, Spencer Gilbert, Joe Starr, Max Dionne Written by Spencer Gilbert, Joe Starr, Dan Murrell & Andy Signore Edited by Kevin Williamsen and TJ Nordaker

Source: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=86F4D497FD3CACCE

“Twin Peaks,” Episode 15 Recap: How Beautiful Is This

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost’s limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.
The best things come to those who wait, and Big Ed Hurley (Everett McGill) has long been dreaming of the moment that opens Part 15 of Mark Frost and David Lynch’s Twin Peaks revival. "I’ve been a selfish bitch to you all these years," says his one-eyed wife Nadine (Wendy Robie), who’s walked a long way—a Dr. Jacoby/Dr. Amp gold, shit-digging shovel slung over her shoulder—to the cash-only Gas Farm that Ed has run for most of his life. She states the obvious: Ed is in love with RR Diner propietor Norma Jennings (Peggy Lipton), and she, Nadine, has always stood in his way. Those days are finally over. Ed is reluctant to think of this as anything beyond another of his spouse’s manic episodes. But she persists, insisting that, over the course of her long walk, she had plenty of time to change her mind, yet didn’t "because this is how I really feel." The journey has only solidified her essential inner truth. "How beautiful is this!" she says.
So very beautiful, and not to be outdone by what follows, as Ed hightails it to the RR and confesses his love to Norma…who rebuffs him in order to meet with her current beau, franchise-fixated businessman Walter Lawford (Grant Goodeve). The song that plays over the scene—Otis Redding’s soaring, soulful "I’ve Been Loving You Too Long"—comes to a reverberative halt, as if Ed’s own heart has skipped a terrible beat. But perhaps this is a last bit of limbo as opposed to a cruel finale? Ed closes his eyes as if in prayer, and it soon becomes clear that Norma is actually rebuffing Walter, giving him back all the spinoff RR diners, keeping the original for herself ("I’m happier with just one"), and, personally, kicking him to the curb. 
"You’re making a huge mistake," says Walter, "and I believe you’re going to regret it"—the words of a true non-romantic who thinks love is always and only about big gestures. More often, a small one suffices. Norma puts her hand lightly on Ed’s shoulder. The rest takes care of itself: "Marry me," says Ed. "Of course I will," says Norma. Shelly Johnson (Mädchen Amick), no stranger herself to romantic travails, stands to the side smiling. The Redding song, which has returned in fits and starts throughout the scene, crescendoes. And over a few gorgeously composed shots, Lynch takes us from the micro to the macro, ascending to the sky above, the clouds seeming to dance in rhythm with the lovers below.
This is one of the most optimistic scenes in Lynch’s oeuvre, and it’s noticeably lacking in the cold, subversive ironies that accompanied, for example, the return to robin red-breasted normalcy in Blue Velvet (1986). This isn’t a case of an artist going soft with age, however. And age isn’t so much the key to the sequence’s emotional pull as it is time—the sense that Lynch and Frost have themselves walked instead of run to this moment. This is how they really feel—deeply, instinctually, sincerely tapping into the flow of these fictional lives, marking the transformative moments instead of forcing them. There’s no formula for this; you can only trust that all the creative elements are in the right place at the right time. More and more, the new Twin Peaks seems to be a meditation on, as much as it is guided by, serendipity.  
It’s more than dumb luck that leads Mr. C. (Kyle MacLachlan), the dark-side doppelganger of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper (also MacLachlan), to the "Convenience Store" where the ashen-faced spirits known as Woodsmen reside. It’s also the place where the otherworldly denizens of the Black Lodge occasionally meet, in the nonexistent space above the building. Mr. C. is here looking for Phillip Jeffries (David Bowie), the former FBI agent who might very well have ordered a hit on him, and who hasn’t been seen since he materialized in the Philadelphia government offices back in 1989 (see Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me).
Mr. C. is led, slowly, through several rooms. A forest fades in and out over the images at certain points, emphasizing the locale’s between-two-worlds nebulousness. Some familiar figures pop up: The red-suited Jumping Man (Carlton Lee Russell), who presided over a Lodge meeting in Fire Walk with Me, as well as an androgynous character credited as Bosomy Woman (Malachy Sreenan), who bears a striking resemblance, in a half-formed way, to the elderly Mrs. Tremont/Chalfont (Frances Bay) from both the original series and the prequel movie. (Could this be a spirit in some strange state of evolution like the Red Room’s Man From Another Place, who morphed from dancing dwarf to electric tree?) 
"I’ll unlock the door for you," she/he says to Mr. C., letting him into a room (#8) at the other end of what appears to be a seedy motel courtyard. Inside, Mr. C. is greeted with another evolved sight: Jeffries has become some kind of sentient tin machine (clever, Mark and Dave, clever) that spouts smoke and speaks in a southern drawl (voice actor Nathan Frizzell again mimics Bowie’s exaggerated cadences). The main point of discussion—beyond Jeffries’ apparent contract on Mr. C.’s life and a series of numbers that seem to be the latitude and longitude of Twin Peaks—is someone the human version of Jeffries referenced back in 1989. "Who is Judy?" asks Mr. C, getting increasingly agitated. "You’ve already met Judy," replies Jeffries. (Proposed Reddit thread theory, since Lynch does have something of a Wizard of Oz theme running through his work: Judy=Judy Garland=Major Garland Briggs.) Mr. C.’s repeated queries to Jeffries go unanswered and he’s soon transported, via telephone, back outside the Convenience Store. There he’s confronted by a gun-toting Richard Horne (Eamon Farren), who casually confirms the identity of his mother—Sherilyn Fenn’s Audrey Horne—before being knocked to the ground by Mr. C. It’s not his time to die, though. "Get in the truck," says Mr. C. "We’ll talk on the way."
From here, Part 15 gets, for the most part, mesmerizingly bleak, beginning with a bravura forest freak-out between not-so-lovable loser Steven Burnett (Caleb Landry Jones) and his paramour Gersten Hayward (Alicia Witt). Both of them are high on substances, and he’s also very suicidal. As he loads his gun, Steven mumbles about how he’s "gonna end it" and how Gersten is "gonna come up with me." He then yammers incoherently about the possibilities of an afterlife: "Will I be with the rhinoceros? The lightning in the bottle? … Or will I be completely, like, turquoise?" This is far from the heavenly vision of Big Ed and Norma, though Lynch and Frost (the latter of whom cameos in this scene as his occasional onscreen alter ego Cyril Pons) aren’t offering it as a tough-truth repudiation of the earlier scene. They’re more comparing and contrasting two types of existential dilemmas, one evergreen and profound (Ed and Norma), the other tenuous and shallow (Steven and Gersten). One resolves in bliss, the other with a bullet.
A slug also ends the life of Las Vegas kingpin Duncan Todd (Patrick Fischler) who, along with his assistant Roger (Joe Adler), is murdered by the psychopathic Chantal Hutchens (Jennifer Jason Leigh). As she and her cohort Gary "Hutch" Hutchens (Tim Roth) chow down on some post-assassination fast food, they ponder their place in a country that sanctions many of its own killings, such as the genocide of Native Americans, as well as bemoan the lack of opportunities, of late, to make their victims suffer. "My fun’s over when we actually kill someone," says Chantal. "It’s no fun torturing a corpse." This is pure sociopathy, but there’s some beauty injected into the scene when the duo look out their windshield and Lynch cuts to an image of the nighttime sky, a single star shining in the distance beyond the numerous utility poles. "Mars," Chantal says, though Leigh’s tone is so perfectly balanced between the childlike and the cynical that a chill quickly returns.
That’s how some people pass the time. Others, like Margaret "The Log Lady" Lanterman (the late Catherine E. Coulson), do their best to come to terms with the past, the present and the inevitable future. New Peaks has been shaded by many actors’ absences, or by the knowledge—as in the case of Miguel Ferrer, who plays FBI forensics specialist Albert Rosenfield—that they died soon after principal photography. Coulson is perhaps the most extreme example, as her scenes were filmed while she was in the final stages of cancer. No doubt Lynch and Frost risked exploitation by photographing her in such a sickly state, and yet her intermittent appearances this season have only accumulated in power because the sage mind of the performer and the character she plays is still so clearly evident.
"You know about death," she says to Deputy Sheriff Tommy "Hawk" Hill (Michael Horse) during their final phone call. "That it’s just a change, not an end." To the end, Margaret (to whom, in a movingly meta twist, the episode is dedicated) maintains her epigrammatic dignity. Her death is signaled not by literal but figurative means, her cabin lamp, seen from a distance through a window, dimming to black just after Hawk has somberly informed his coworkers of her passing. Lynch has always been fascinated by the freakishness of infirmity, and his work is at its best when his unflinching gaze (on the sick, on the malformed, on those who society at large would consider aberrant) is informed by a distant yet discernible empathy. The effect is truly surreal: We’re forced to look at people long past the points of politesse and comfort, and in the process go beyond any exterior grotesquerie, toward the soul, awed and aching, underneath. We’re all walking (or running or driving) toward the same destination, though as former Lynch collaborator John Hurt (the Elephant Man himself) once said in a very different context, quoting Ralph Waldo Emerson, "How much of human life is lost in waiting."
"I’m waiting for someone," says Ruby (Charlyne Yi) to two burly biker dudes in the episode’s final scene, which is set, of course, at the Roadhouse. Comedians are their own kind of freak, and it initially appears Lynch and Frost are setting us up for something humorous given Yi’s droll career in stand-up, film and TV, and especially once the bikers lift Ruby out of her booth, placing her, hilariously loose-limbed, on the floor. (Perhaps Wally Brando, played by Yi’s former collaborator Michael Cera, will ride to the rescue?) No…this isn’t that. Onstage, the indie rock band The Veils play a discordant tune, "Axolotl," off their 2016 album Total Depravity. As the song intensifies, Ruby crawls along the Roadhouse floor, looking more and more pathetic as she weaves her way among the patrons’ legs. She may be waiting for someone, but they’re not coming.
There is, as ever, only one certainty. Not everyone has a Nadine to free them, a Norma or Big Ed to love them, though blessed are those who do. The rest—as Ruby illustrates before the episode’s horrifying cut to black—just scream.
MORE SLICES OF PIE 
• Welcome back, Agent Cooper? Amid the whirl of incident in this episode is a single scene at the home of Dougie (MacLachlan) and Janey-E Jones (Naomi Watts). Janey-E serves her semi-catatonic hubby some cake, which he proceeds to eat very slowly. Then he hits the buttons on a remote control, which turns on a TV showing Billy Wilder’s Sunset Blvd. (1950), a Lynch favorite. It’s the scene in which aging silent-film icon Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson) is leaving her meeting with Cecil B. DeMille (playing himself). "The old team together again," says a deluded Norma. "Nothing can stop us." (A perfect metatextual prism through which to view this Peaks revival.) "Get Gordon Cole," says DeMille, referring to the property master played by an uncredited Bert Moorhouse in Wilder’s film, and also, extra-narratively, to Cooper’s own boss, played by Lynch himself. That’s the memory cue Dougie needs, and he’s soon crawling on the floor toward an electrical outlet into which he sticks the non-pronged end of a fork. Janey-E screams as the lights flicker and Cooper/Dougie collapses. This seemingly fulfills the implied prophecy of Part 3 of the new series: Recall that the life-size outlet through which Cooper travels has, at different points, the numbers "3" and "15" above it, likely corresponding to the episodes in which Cooper becomes Dougie and then, here, becomes Cooper again.
• An earlier scene in the Roadhouse, scored to ZZ Top’s "Sharp Dressed Man," sees James Hurley (James Marshall) nearly beaten to a pulp by the husband, Chuck (Rodney Rowland, who X-Files fans may recall as Dana Scully’s one-night stand from Season 4’s killer-tattoo-with-the-voice-of-Jodie-Foster episode "Never Again"), of his crush Renee (Jessica Szohr). Fortunately for James, his green-gloved buddy Freddie Sykes (Jake Wardle) steps in to knock Chuck and his buddy Skipper (Casey O’Neill) to the ground. Unfortunately, they both appear to be catatonic, and James is later informed by Hawk, who arrests both James and Freddie for assault, that both men are in intensive care. Perhaps not-so-coincidentally, the holding cell that Freddie is put in is #8, the same number as the room above the Convenience Store that houses Phillip Jeffries. James is in cell #7. In the hold across from James and Freddie sits the eyeless spirit woman Naido (Nae Yuuki). Nearby is the beat-up, bloodied drunk (Jay Aaseng) who repeats everything everyone else says (and who I maintain might by the mysterious "Billy" referenced by Audrey Horne). Rounding out this motley crew is the double-dealing Deputy Chad Broxford (John Pirruccello). Presumably everyone will have a role to play in whatever final reckoning awaits.
• Just before he drives away from the Convenience Store, Mr. C. texts "Las Vegas?" to an unknown number, which we know belongs to Diane Evans (Laura Dern), since she received this message in Part 12.
• FBI agent Randall Headley (Jay R. Ferguson) returns briefly to interview one of the 20+ Dougie and Janey-E Jones’s in the Las Vegas area. It’s clear this isn’t the couple he’s looking for after his assistant, Wilson (Owain Rhys Davies), tells him they brought their "kids," plural. "Kids-uh!" screams Headley twice before he opens the interrogation room door on the picture-perfect model of a nightmare American family.
• Audrey Horne makes it to the threshold of her home this week, but decides not to leave since she’s convinced her husband, Charlie (Clark Middleton), is doing his usual reverse-psychological manipulation. She ends up choking him and cursing him out before the scene abruptly cuts away. Presumably whatever nightmare scenario she’s in (be it a coma, an existential dreamspace, a mental hospital, or, god forbid, real life) will soon be revealed. I also want to note that in previous recaps I misidentified Middleton as a dwarf, when he actually stands 5’4", his unique physical appearance the result of a bout, beginning at the age of 4, with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. That’s a purely surface fact, and beyond whatever resources Middleton’s condition helps him to call on, it has little to do with the complex, unsettling brilliance of his performance as Charlie. It’s as if he and Fenn are off in their own strange corner of the Peaks universe doing an anti-romantic comedy riff on Sartre. I can’t wait to see how it plays out.
• The end credits roll over two shots of the motel courtyard that Mr. C. walks across to get to Phillip Jeffries’s room. If you look closely, just as the final title scrolls up, you’ll notice the Bosomy Woman standing there in the shadows. Eeeeeeeek!

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First Official Trailer for Snowy French Retro Horror Film ‘Cold Ground’

Cold Ground Trailer

"The lucky ones freeze to death." A trailer has debuted for a snowy indie horror titled Cold Ground, a creature feature about a team of documentary filmmakers who venture into the mountains. Set in the 1970s, the found footage story follows journalists who head to the French-Swiss border to investigate a strange case of cattle mutilations, but the scientific team they were supposed to meet is nowhere to be found. This is described as a retro horror that is like "The Blair Witch Project meets The Descent", and it’s filmed to look like it was made in the 70s with Super 8 cameras. Starring Doug Rand, Philip Schurer, Gala Besson, Fabrice Pierre, and Maura Tillay. This looks very scary, here’s to hoping it’s as good as the quotes claim.

Here’s the first official trailer (+ poster) for Fabien Delage’s Cold Ground, direct from YouTube:

Cold Ground Movie

1976: Two young journalists leave for the French-Swiss border to investigate a strange case of cattle mutilations for French TV. Yet, once they get there, the scientific team they were supposed to meet has gone missing. Cold Ground is both written and directed by French filmmaker Fabien Delage, of the films Dead Crossroads: Paranormal Activity Abounds and Fury of the Demon previously. This will premiere at various horror film festivals coming up this fall. Wild Eye Releasing will release then Cold Ground in select theaters starting sometime in early 2018, stay tuned for an exact date. Visit the official website. Thoughts?

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An American Original: The RogerEbert.com Staff Remembers Jerry Lewis

An American Original: The RogerEbert.com Staff Remembers Jerry Lewis

August 22, 2017
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The world lost one of its most beloved comedians this past Sunday with the death of Jerry Lewis. Scott Jordan Harris penned our obituary, but we wanted to let other members of our staff share their thoughts on such an influential, legendary director.

PABLO VILLAÇA

Jerry Lewis was one of the main reasons I fell in love with the movies. When I was a kid, his movies were a fixture of Brazilian TV during the afternoons—and I can vividly remember how they made me feel; it was fascinating to watch that man-child and his grown-up, charming, singing best friend living so many adventures and facing adversities by supporting each other. Lewis’ solo movies were also a reason of constant delight and I soon began to associate Cinema with pleasant, happy feelings. However, it didn’t take long for them to also start teaching me how film involved more than just a script and a few actors: watching “The Ladies Man,” I became aware of the importance of production design; with “The Bellboy” and “Who’s Minding the Store?,” I realized how sound could be powerful; and with most of the rest I understood how comedy could also break your heart. Lewis was a genius as a comedian, as an actor, as a director—well, as an artist. He was 91 years old, but he left us too early. This loss stings me deeply and that shows his force and his legacy as a human being. I wish I believed in an afterlife just so I could imagine Lewis finally reunited with his “pardner” once again.

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DONALD LIEBENSON 

In 1963, I was seven years old. Our family was on vacation in California. There was a two-screen movie theatre near our hotel. On one screen, “Bye Bye Birdie.” On the other, “The Nutty Professor.” The poster for “The Nutty Professor” made it look like a horror film (“What did he become? What kind of monster?”) I was scared to go into that theatre, but my father said to me, “That’s Jerry Lewis. If Jerry Lewis is in it, it’s going to be funny.” Much of my love for movies and comedy can be traced directly to Jerry, whose Paramount comedies, with and without Dean, were staples on NBC Saturday Night at the Movies, and at Saturday matinees at Highland Park’s venerable Alcyon Theatre. 

When I learned of his passing, I did not go directly to the classic comedies of my childhood, “The Errand Boy,” “The Disorderly Orderly,” or “The Family Jewels,” I went to my favorite scene of his from the underseen “Funny Bones,” in which his character, a comedy icon, delineates for his son, a comedy flop, the difference between “a funny bones comedian and a non-funny bones comedian.” There is a lifetime of hard-earned wisdom in his delivery of, “We were funny people … we had funny bones.”

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SUSAN WLOSZCZYNA

Judging by the comments and obits on my social media feed about comedian, actor, filmmaker and philanthropist Jerry Lewis, I am not alone with my love-hate relationship with this divisive legend who left a giant mark on pop culture. I idolized him for a while as a grade-schooler because I could relate to his crazy voices, elaborate pratfalls and infantilized gaze at the world around him. I recall going to the drive-in the early ‘60s with my parents and my older brother for a triple bill of “The Errand Boy,” “Cinderfella” and “The Bellboy.” They all started falling asleep at some point but I protested when they wanted to leave after the second film. We stayed. I watched. They snoozed. I laughed.

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When I got older, I also developed a fondness for “The Nutty Professor,” which encapsulated the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde psychological conundrum of what it meant to be a man in the era of the ring-a-ding-ding Rat Pack and the Kennedy clan. I confess to dating a musician in my grad-school years very briefly who assumed the stage name of Buddy Love just for that reason. And, yes, he was a jerk. 

That rather sophisticated upgrade in his comic vision convinced me that Lewis had something more on the ball than just pulling faces. But it took Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy,” a dark drama about celebrity-hood and idol worship that very much played off the star’s aloof off-stage persona that made me and many others to reconsider Lewis in a more serious way. The guy could drop the goofy act and actually act. 

But it was that maudlin annual ritual of watching his self-gratifying TV performance as a do-gooder every Labor Day during his Muscular Dystrophy telethon that truly drove me crazy. Yes, he was making a difference but also wanted the public to observe every minute of it. It was train-wreck TV writ large. Still, I used to make a point to always try to watch Lewis sing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from one of my favorite musicals, “Carousel,” usually with tears streaming down his face after they announced the final total that was raised. 

When I went to work at USA TODAY in the ‘80s, my fellow film critic and writer Mike Clark was, among other things, a world-class worshiper of Lewis and his onetime partner Dean Martin. So anything that involved either of them was definitely on his beat. So imagine my surprise when, after my rather lengthy tribute to James Stewart ran on the front page of the paper after his death on July 2, 1997, I received a letter from none other than Jerry Lewis. 

What he wrote actually made me teary-eyed. Such a generous open-faced expression of praise from a famous person is a rarity, especially when the matter at hand isn’t even about them. I realized then that this class clown was quite capable of being a classy act. While I am still not a big fan of much of his work—although I made a point to see him onstage in “Damn Yankees,” and was blown away—I became a bigger fan of the man himself that day.

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PETER SOBCZYNSKI

If the life of the late Jerry Lewis was to be examined solely on the basis of his contributions as a comedian, his place in the cultural firmament would be secure. In a career that stretched back to the days of vaudeville and which would cover radio, television, film and Broadway, he made audiences around the world laugh for decades and would also inspire generations of of comic performers to emerge in his wake. And yet, his other contributions as a filmmaker, an author, a dramatic actor and a humanitarian were so extraordinary that even if one were to somehow strike all of his comedic performances from the record, you would still be left with a career resume of enough import to make most others seem kind of puny by comparison. Put it this way—while the word “legendary” usually comes across as just another empty honorific when used to describe most entertainers, it almost seems too puny and inadequate to fully and fairly describe Lewis and his accomplishments.

He was, first and foremost, a comedian and he was indeed one of the greats. When he burst onto the scene in an act alongside Dean Martin, audiences could not believe what they were seeing. With his wheedling voice, rubber face and facility for wild slapstick, especially in comparison to the sense of holy cool represented by Martin, it was as if the long-suppressed id of the post-war American psyche could no longer be contained and finally exploded in ways that many found to be breathtakingly hilarious and other found to be crass, vulgar and juvenile (a dichotomy that would continue to endure throughout his career). And yet, if you watch a film like “Hollywood or Bust” or “The Ladies Man” or, most famously, “The Nutty Professor, you cannot help but notice Lewis’ incredible sense of control in regards to performing—they may have looked at times like the ravings of a madman but his best work had a genuine grace and finesse behind it that would put most comedic performers of any era to shame. His work in “The Nutty Professor,” for example, must have been fiendishly complicated for him on any number of technical and emotional levels (for a comedian whose weakness was probably his unabashed desire to be loved and accepted, to do a film taking that very concept to its absurd and sometimes frightening extremes must have been a challenge). But his deftness in switching between the adorably awkward Julius Kelp and the slick sleaze ball Buddy Love was so nimbly handled that it deserves to go down as one of the great comedic performances in screen history.

Like most comedians, Lewis wanted to be taken more seriously from time to time and while his efforts in this area were not always successful—his ultimately aborted Holocaust drama “The Day the Clown Cried” being the prime example—he did have his share of triumphs in this area as well. His most famous dramatic turn came in “The King of Comedy,” which he was asked to go toe-to-toe with Robert De Niro (at the point when his status as the Great American Actor was at its peak) under the direction of Martin Scorsese to play a thinly disguised version of himself being pestered and ultimately kidnapped by a psychotic fan. Even the most skilled of dramatic actors would find that a virtually impossible challenge and yet Lewis pulled it off to such a stunning degree that the fact that he did not even earn an Oscar nomination for his efforts—let alone win the award he so richly deserved. Although few of his subsequent dramatic efforts—films like the cult oddity “Arizona Dream,” the British charmer “Funny Bones” and the recent indie drama “Max Rose” and appearances on the television shows “Wiseguy” and “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit”—received the same amount of notice as “The King of Comedy,” they nevertheless proved that his performance there was no flash in the pan.

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As his artistic ambitions flourished alongside his popular success, Lewis began moving behind the camera to work as a director as well as an actor, a relative rarity in those days in general and almost unheard of for a comedian not named Charlie Chaplin. Not only would Lewis’ efforts as a director pave the way for the likes of Mel Brooks and Woody Allen (the latter of whom was so enthralled by Lewis’s talent that he asked him to direct “Take the Money and Run”) but it would reveal him to be uncommonly skilled in that area as well. Most screen comedies until that time were not especially cinematic—they tended to plop down the camera where it could best capture the action and that was it. Lewis, on the other hand, was interested in exploring the possibilities of the medium by utilizing the tools he had at his disposal in formally innovative and oftentimes hilarious ways that could enthrall a roomful of super-serious cineastes and a theater of people looking for entertainment in equal measure. 

His directorial debut, “The Bellboy” is 70 minutes of pure goofiness that is arguably the funniest film he ever made and “The Nutty Professor” is enough of a classic that even Lewis’s detractors are usually willing to give it some slack.  It is too bad that he retired from directing in 1983 after making “Smorgasbord”—an uneven film that nevertheless contains at least one scene, in which he struggles to contend with the recent waxed floor of an office, that might be the funniest bit of slapstick he ever did on film—because the mind boggles at the thought of what he might have accomplished using the latest developments in CGI technology. In the late ’60s, he found himself teaching a class on the various aspects of filmmaking at USC and his lectures formed the basis of a 1970 called The Total Filmmaker that remains one of the best books covering the entire process of making a film that I have ever read. (In the end, he specifically cites one young filmmaker as being destined for greatness despite having only one short film to his name at the time—a then-unknown Steven Spielberg.)

And now, he is gone and while that news does not exactly come as a surprise in theory—he was 91 years old and had been in poor health in recent years—it will still come as a massive blow to anyone with even a trace interest in popular culture in general and comedy in particular. Lewis inspired millions of laughs from moviegoers around the globe, raised millions of dollars through his telethons for Muscular Dystrophy that used to be a Labor Day staple and even in his later years, he was still capable of the occasional triumph—after numerous failed attempts to get there over the years, he finally had a genuine Broadway hit in the ’90s in a smash revival of “Damn Yankees” and wrote a fascinating memoir of his years working with Dean Martin. Simply put, Jerry Lewis was an American original. And while many have tried to copy what he has done over the years and will no doubt continue such attempts for decades to come, there will never be another quite like him.

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Adam Scott Battles an Evil Child in First Trailer for Netflix’s ‘Little Evil’

Adam Scott Battles an Evil Child in First Trailer for Netflix’s ‘Little Evil’

by
August 22, 2017
Source: YouTube

“There is nothing wrong with Lucas!” Netflix has released the official trailer for an indie horror comedy titled Little Evil, the latest from Eli Craig, director of the other great horror comedy Tucker and Dale vs Evil. Remember that one? We covered it closely during its release back in 2010. Little Evil stars Adam Scott as a man who marries the woman of his dreams, played by Evangeline Lilly. The only problem is that her child is the antichrist. Also starring Bridget Everett, Clancy Brown, Tyler Labine, Donald Faison, Chris D’Elia, and Owen Atlas as Lucas. This looks good, don’t think we’ve seen many comedies making fun of the evil child horror trope, but I’m up for this. Glad to see something new from Eli Craig, too. Enjoy.

Here’s the first official trailer (+ poster) for Eli Craig’s Little Evil, direct from Netflix’s YouTube:

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Little Evil Movie

Meet Gary (Adam Scott). He just married Samantha (Evangeline Lilly), the woman of his dreams. There’s one problem, his stepson is the antichrist. Little Evil is both written and directed by American filmmaker Eli Craig, of the horror comedy film Tucker and Dale vs Evil and a few shorts previously, as well as an episode of “Brothers & Sisters” and the “Zombieland” TV pilot. This film was produced by Jason Michael Berman, Nicholas David Nesbitt, and Scott Stuber; for Bluegrass Films and Mandalay Pictures. Netflix will release Craig’s Little Evil direct to streaming starting September 1st this fall. Add it to your list. Anyone?

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