The Style Files: Dara Caponigro

Dara Caponigro is a force in the world of design and interiors. Dara is currently the Creative Director of one of the most well-respected fabric houses in the industry, F. Schumacher & Co, where she directs and oversees product development, advertising and marketing, visual merchandising, and the website. Dara’s presence at the company has seen a total change in the marketing and branding at the company, both of which feel fresh, editorial, and inspiring. Prior to joining Schumacher, Dara held a slew of illustrious positions as a magazine editor. She was the Editor-in-Chief at Veranda and before that, she was the founding editor at the original Domino and held several senior editorial posts at House Beautiful and ELLE DECOR.

It is probably a safe assumption to say that Dara has just about seen it all in the design world. As such, it is no surprise that her latest endeavor, writing the recently released The Authentics in collaboration with photographer Melanie Acevedo, is a celebration of those who march to the beat of their own drum, doing things their own way, blazing new paths, and sharing their unique perspective with the world. The Authentics profiles luminaries from the worlds of art, design, and fashion including Kelly Wearstler, Ashley and Katalina Hicks, Nicky Haslam, and Joseph Dirand among others, who go beyond simply living stylishly, but also apply a sense of authenticity and individuality to everything they do. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Dara about the things that inspire her, her career, and her favorite things. I hope you’ll enjoy the first Style Files interview of 2018 as much as I enjoyed working on this feature. 

Paloma Contreras: How would you describe your style?

Dara Caponigro: Very edited.  Classic and clean with a bit of an edge.

{Designer Veere Grenney’s London Apartment which Dara Published while she was Editor in Chief of Veranda– Veere also has a fabric line at Schumacher now, where Dara serves as Creative Director.}

PC: Where do you turn for inspiration?

DC: I grew up in a beautifully designed (and very neat) house – my mom was an interior designer and constantly thinking outside the box so our place was her idea laboratory.  My best friend’s house was charmingly cluttered and brimming with interesting things – amazing photographs, letters, books — her dad was the photo editor of Time magazine in its heyday — and there were always cool stories/people/things to experience. I like to think of my own home as a combination of the two – designed, yes, but also full of objects (some with pedigree, some without) that have stories to tell.  I like it to get a little messy. Then, when I can’t take it anymore – I do a big cleaning and start again. To sum it up, I guess it says that I’m passionate about design and love beautiful things, but that I know what’s important in life. 

{A Beautiful Vignette from Dara’s New Book, The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: Where do you turn for inspiration?

DC: Travel, museum exhibitions, nature.

{The Beautiful Fabrics from the Vogue Living Collection for Schumacher Draw upon Inspiration from Nature}

PC: Who are your personal style icons?

DC: My mom.  Albert Hadley.  Geoffrey Beene.  

{Albert Hadley}

PC: What trait do you most admire in a person?

DC: Kindness


{Kata and Ashley Hicks at Home in England as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: What is your guilty pleasure?

DC: Ebay and Etsy

{Nicky Haslam’s Home as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: Who or what has been your greatest professional influence?

DC: Louis Oliver Gropp, the legendary editor-in-chief:  House & Garden in the 80s, then Elle Decor and, finally, House Beautiful in the 90s – he taught me what it means to be a journalist and how to let people run with their strengths. . Deborah Needleman – the genius behind domino who was so ahead of everything.  She  transformed how Americans think about decorating  by giving them the tools to find and express their personal style.

{A Home Designed by Joseph Dirand as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: What is your idea of living “la dolce vita”?

DC: Not being in a rush.  Having time to do things well – whether that’s cooking, flower arranging, parenting or working. 

{Miles Redd Relaxing at his Home in Shelter Island as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: What can we look forward to next from you?

DC: At Schumacher, we have so much happening.   Did you know that we have new collections coming out every single month?  I’m so proud of what we’ve accomplished  — we’ve completely re-energized the company with gorgeous product (everything from sophisticated cut velvets to classic prints to artisanal fabrics that really speak to handcraft), editorially-driven marketing and social media that is super fresh and engaging,  a new showroom in San Francisco, renovated showrooms (we just finished Boston. Laguna, Dania and LA are next), a groundbreaking website and apps that we are forever improving, and exacting customer service.  We never take our foot off the pedal! 

I’ve also been moonlighting and released my new book called The Authentics in late October.  I worked on it with my co-author, Melanie Acevedo, who is a photographer extraordinaire and also a dear friend.  It was a reaction to, what we see as, a world that is becoming increasingly homogenized and a lot less interesting.  We wanted to focus on true creative originals who march to the beat of their own drum and who do what they do because they are driven to do it, not because they are searching for mass approval.  Filled with gorgeous original photography by Melanie, it is a style book, for sure, but it is so much more than that because we delve into what makes our subjects tick.  They are absolutely inspiring and there is so much to learn from them about finding one’s own voice.

Go-To Outfit: Any kind of dress.  They’re so easy when you’re a working woman.  You don’t need to think about it.  Just throw it on with a great pair of shoes and a piece of jewelry and you’re done.

Style Mantra: Style it up and then take one thing away

Scent: Citrus

Piece of Jewelry: A great cuff, or jewelry from the 19th century. 

Color I Never Tire Of: White, probably because I’m surrounded by color all day.

Flower: Daffodils because they’re so happy, hopeful and unpretentious

Indispensable Design Element: Light, and Fabric (of course!)

Era for Design: I love all of them, even a fussy Victorian piece can be cool treated in the right way.

Fabric/Textile:  They’re all my babies so it’s hard to choose.  I will tell you that I just ordered Talos for our house in the Bronx as well as Design 501 by Frank Lloyd Wright for Schumacher. Magical Menagerie is going in our country house.

Hostess Gift:  Anything at Thomas O’Brien’s and Dan Fink’s new store, Copper Beech,  in Bellport, NY.  I also love Neue Galerie.  They sell a fantastic set of wrapping paper with designs by Josef Hoffman.  Or, lavender wands made with velvet ribbon in the host’s or hostess’ favorite color.  

Meal: Anything that you can only get once a year: fresh figs, soft shell crabs, pumpkin pie.  

Drink:  It depends on the season.  At Christmas, vodka with soda with a splash of pomegranate juice and an orange slice

Way to Unwind after a Long Day at Work:  Turner Classic Movies.  I’m currently obsessed with Italian and French film from the 50s, 60s and 70s.

What I Love About My City: Sadly, I’ve fallen SOMEWHAT out of love with New York City for the reasons that I did my book. However, I recently went to the South Street Seaport and was charmed by its transformation from a touristy destination with tons of chaos stores to a real neighborhood with fun, cool shops and cafes. How refreshing! 

Hotel:  Lately, it’s The Beverly Hills hotel because it’s so authentic.

City:  Naples, also because it’s so authentic, but I don’t think it’s for everyone. 

Museum: I’ve taken The Met for granted for years but I was just there seeing the Irving Penn and Rei Kawakubo shows.  For some reason, I saw it in a whole new light.  Wow, is that place amazing! I just got back from Edingburgh and I found the Portrait Gallery there mesmerizing. Not only are the portraits evocative, but the stories of the various sitters are unbelievable.  It made me realize why we’re all so obsessed with royalty – their stories are like soap operas – you can hardly believe they are true.

Artist:  Lucien Freud 

Actor/Actress: Elizabeth Taylor, especially in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf

Prized Possession: a Robsjohn-Gibbons dining table that is hard to place stylistically.  It could be modern or it could be classical.  I like that it’s hard to peg.  

Risk Worth Taking: Speeding

Rule to Break: Symmetry

Movie Set Design: I can’t say its my favorite but I love how stylized, glamorous and fantastical the sets are in Top Hat. Pulling those sets off required ingenuity and hutzpah.  

I can never have too many…dishes

 

 

Source: http://ift.tt/1fR8B2G

The Style Files: Dara Caponigro

Dara Caponigro is a force in the world of design and interiors. Dara is currently the Creative Director of one of the most well-respected fabric houses in the industry, F. Schumacher & Co, where she directs and oversees product development, advertising and marketing, visual merchandising, and the website. Dara’s presence at the company has seen a total change in the marketing and branding at the company, both of which feel fresh, editorial, and inspiring. Prior to joining Schumacher, Dara held a slew of illustrious positions as a magazine editor. She was the Editor-in-Chief at Veranda and before that, she was the founding editor at the original Domino and held several senior editorial posts at House Beautiful and ELLE DECOR.

It is probably a safe assumption to say that Dara has just about seen it all in the design world. As such, it is no surprise that her latest endeavor, writing the recently released The Authentics in collaboration with photographer Melanie Acevedo, is a celebration of those who march to the beat of their own drum, doing things their own way, blazing new paths, and sharing their unique perspective with the world. The Authentics profiles luminaries from the worlds of art, design, and fashion including Kelly Wearstler, Ashley and Katalina Hicks, Nicky Haslam, and Joseph Dirand among others, who go beyond simply living stylishly, but also apply a sense of authenticity and individuality to everything they do. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Dara about the things that inspire her, her career, and her favorite things. I hope you’ll enjoy the first Style Files interview of 2018 as much as I enjoyed working on this feature. 

Paloma Contreras: How would you describe your style?

Dara Caponigro: Very edited.  Classic and clean with a bit of an edge.

{Designer Veere Grenney’s London Apartment which Dara Published while she was Editor in Chief of Veranda– Veere also has a fabric line at Schumacher now, where Dara serves as Creative Director.}

PC: Where do you turn for inspiration?

DC: I grew up in a beautifully designed (and very neat) house – my mom was an interior designer and constantly thinking outside the box so our place was her idea laboratory.  My best friend’s house was charmingly cluttered and brimming with interesting things – amazing photographs, letters, books — her dad was the photo editor of Time magazine in its heyday — and there were always cool stories/people/things to experience. I like to think of my own home as a combination of the two – designed, yes, but also full of objects (some with pedigree, some without) that have stories to tell.  I like it to get a little messy. Then, when I can’t take it anymore – I do a big cleaning and start again. To sum it up, I guess it says that I’m passionate about design and love beautiful things, but that I know what’s important in life. 

{A Beautiful Vignette from Dara’s New Book, The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: Where do you turn for inspiration?

DC: Travel, museum exhibitions, nature.

{The Beautiful Fabrics from the Vogue Living Collection for Schumacher Draw upon Inspiration from Nature}

PC: Who are your personal style icons?

DC: My mom.  Albert Hadley.  Geoffrey Beene.  

{Albert Hadley}

PC: What trait do you most admire in a person?

DC: Kindness


{Kata and Ashley Hicks at Home in England as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: What is your guilty pleasure?

DC: Ebay and Etsy

{Nicky Haslam’s Home as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: Who or what has been your greatest professional influence?

DC: Louis Oliver Gropp, the legendary editor-in-chief:  House & Garden in the 80s, then Elle Decor and, finally, House Beautiful in the 90s – he taught me what it means to be a journalist and how to let people run with their strengths. . Deborah Needleman – the genius behind domino who was so ahead of everything.  She  transformed how Americans think about decorating  by giving them the tools to find and express their personal style.

{A Home Designed by Joseph Dirand as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: What is your idea of living “la dolce vita”?

DC: Not being in a rush.  Having time to do things well – whether that’s cooking, flower arranging, parenting or working. 

{Miles Redd Relaxing at his Home in Shelter Island as featured in The Authentics | Photography by Melanie Acevedo}

PC: What can we look forward to next from you?

DC: At Schumacher, we have so much happening.   Did you know that we have new collections coming out every single month?  I’m so proud of what we’ve accomplished  — we’ve completely re-energized the company with gorgeous product (everything from sophisticated cut velvets to classic prints to artisanal fabrics that really speak to handcraft), editorially-driven marketing and social media that is super fresh and engaging,  a new showroom in San Francisco, renovated showrooms (we just finished Boston. Laguna, Dania and LA are next), a groundbreaking website and apps that we are forever improving, and exacting customer service.  We never take our foot off the pedal! 

I’ve also been moonlighting and released my new book called The Authentics in late October.  I worked on it with my co-author, Melanie Acevedo, who is a photographer extraordinaire and also a dear friend.  It was a reaction to, what we see as, a world that is becoming increasingly homogenized and a lot less interesting.  We wanted to focus on true creative originals who march to the beat of their own drum and who do what they do because they are driven to do it, not because they are searching for mass approval.  Filled with gorgeous original photography by Melanie, it is a style book, for sure, but it is so much more than that because we delve into what makes our subjects tick.  They are absolutely inspiring and there is so much to learn from them about finding one’s own voice.

Go-To Outfit: Any kind of dress.  They’re so easy when you’re a working woman.  You don’t need to think about it.  Just throw it on with a great pair of shoes and a piece of jewelry and you’re done.

Style Mantra: Style it up and then take one thing away

Scent: Citrus

Piece of Jewelry: A great cuff, or jewelry from the 19th century. 

Color I Never Tire Of: White, probably because I’m surrounded by color all day.

Flower: Daffodils because they’re so happy, hopeful and unpretentious

Indispensable Design Element: Light, and Fabric (of course!)

Era for Design: I love all of them, even a fussy Victorian piece can be cool treated in the right way.

Fabric/Textile:  They’re all my babies so it’s hard to choose.  I will tell you that I just ordered Talos for our house in the Bronx as well as Design 501 by Frank Lloyd Wright for Schumacher. Magical Menagerie is going in our country house.

Hostess Gift:  Anything at Thomas O’Brien’s and Dan Fink’s new store, Copper Beech,  in Bellport, NY.  I also love Neue Galerie.  They sell a fantastic set of wrapping paper with designs by Josef Hoffman.  Or, lavender wands made with velvet ribbon in the host’s or hostess’ favorite color.  

Meal: Anything that you can only get once a year: fresh figs, soft shell crabs, pumpkin pie.  

Drink:  It depends on the season.  At Christmas, vodka with soda with a splash of pomegranate juice and an orange slice

Way to Unwind after a Long Day at Work:  Turner Classic Movies.  I’m currently obsessed with Italian and French film from the 50s, 60s and 70s.

What I Love About My City: Sadly, I’ve fallen SOMEWHAT out of love with New York City for the reasons that I did my book. However, I recently went to the South Street Seaport and was charmed by its transformation from a touristy destination with tons of chaos stores to a real neighborhood with fun, cool shops and cafes. How refreshing! 

Hotel:  Lately, it’s The Beverly Hills hotel because it’s so authentic.

City:  Naples, also because it’s so authentic, but I don’t think it’s for everyone. 

Museum: I’ve taken The Met for granted for years but I was just there seeing the Irving Penn and Rei Kawakubo shows.  For some reason, I saw it in a whole new light.  Wow, is that place amazing! I just got back from Edingburgh and I found the Portrait Gallery there mesmerizing. Not only are the portraits evocative, but the stories of the various sitters are unbelievable.  It made me realize why we’re all so obsessed with royalty – their stories are like soap operas – you can hardly believe they are true.

Artist:  Lucien Freud 

Actor/Actress: Elizabeth Taylor, especially in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf

Prized Possession: a Robsjohn-Gibbons dining table that is hard to place stylistically.  It could be modern or it could be classical.  I like that it’s hard to peg.  

Risk Worth Taking: Speeding

Rule to Break: Symmetry

Movie Set Design: I can’t say its my favorite but I love how stylized, glamorous and fantastical the sets are in Top Hat. Pulling those sets off required ingenuity and hutzpah.  

I can never have too many…dishes

 

 

Source: http://ift.tt/1fR8B2G

Yes, You Can Save Money in Bora Bora

The post Yes, You Can Save Money in Bora Bora appeared first on Club Thrifty.

In late August, Holly and I had the opportunity to go on a once-in-a-lifetime trip. Yes, we travel a lot, but this was the type of trip that even we couldn’t say “no” to. You know, bucket list stuff!

We totally went to Bora Bora, and we even got to stay at the Four Seasons.

Bam!

Yes, the island was beautiful. Yes, the hotel was amazing. And yes, we even got to meet this guy for a few minutes:

#dontbejealous 😉

Isn’t Bora Bora Super Expensive?

As incredible as this trip was, let’s go ahead and address the elephant in the room: Why is a frugal travel blog writing about saving money in Bora Bora of all places?

For starters, with the right plan and a few tricks, you can make any destination in the world more affordable. I’m not ashamed to admit that we did some pretty ridiculous stuff to save a buck or two on our Bora Bora trip, and you can easily do the same with the tips I’m about to offer.

Second, you can pay for most of your trip to Bora Bora with credit card rewards, which is totally in line with the theme of this website.

Third, I just think Bora Bora is worth talking about. I mean, the pictures of this place are so amazing that I just had to share.

Is Bora Bora on your bucket list? Use these 16 tips to save money in Bora Bora, and your dream vacation may be more affordable than you think!

Look, no matter how you slice it, traveling to Bora Bora is going to cost some money. There’s just no way around it. But if you’re planning a special trip for a honeymoon or an important anniversary, don’t rule this place out on price alone. By starting a vacation fund and following these tips, you might be able to save enough money that you can check Bora Bora off of your bucket list as well!

16 Ways to Save Money in Bora Bora

#1: Fly to Tahiti with airline miles. – No matter where you travel, airline tickets are going to be one of your biggest expenses. Bora Bora is out in the middle of the South Pacific, and you’ll first need to fly to Tahiti before hopping a local flight to the island. Luckily, Air Tahiti Nui and Air France have point options available. Delta Skymiles, American AAdvantage, and Flying Blue miles are also all good options.

#2: Stay in a hotel (and maybe even an over-water bungalow) on points. – Bora Bora has a number of different hotels where you can use loyalty points to book a free or reduced stay. If you have Hilton points, consider redeeming them at the Conrad Bora Bora Nui. IHG points can be used at the Intercontinental Le Moana or the Bora Bora Resort Thalasso Spa. You could also redeem Starwood Preferred Guest points at the St. Regis Bora Bora or the Le Meridian Bora Bora.

#3: Book a package with some meals included. – Food is super expensive on Bora Bora. When booking your hotel, consider adding a meal package onto your stay. Several of the hotels offer packages that include one or more meals per day. Even if you can just get one meal a day included, you could end up saving hundreds of dollars.

#4: Get a credit card with no foreign transaction fees. – While you’re there, be sure to use a credit card without any foreign transactions fees. These fees generally cost about 3% of the purchase price, which can really add up quickly – especially if you’re using a card to pay for all (or part) of your room. Most travel rewards cards come without foreign transaction fees, and many offer a huge signup bonus for getting started. Find our favorite travel rewards cards here.

#5: Pack your own snacks. – As I just mentioned, food on Bora Bora is crazy expensive. Unfortunately, you can’t just run across the street to grab snacks at the local grocery store either. Most of the resorts are not actually on the main island, so you have to take a ferry across the lagoon to find a store. That’s usually much more expensive than just eating at the resort. Rather than spending hundreds on snack food, pack a few snacks in your checked luggage and save some money.

#6: Pack your own alcohol. – Like food, alcohol at the resorts is not cheap. At our hotel, the local beer cost $10 a bottle – although you got a discount for buying 6 at a time. So, a 12-pack cost $100!!! Knowing this ahead of time, we brought a box of Franzia wine and a 12-pack of beer to enjoy on the balcony of our over-water bungalo… and we’re not even ashamed about it!

#7: Head into town to stock up on food, snacks, and mixers. – If you fail to pack your own snacks, you can always head into town to grab some of the things you need. Again, unless you’re staying on the main island, you’ll probably need to take a ferry to get there. Just try to grab everything you need in one trip so you’re not spending a fortune in ferry fees. Since food and drinks are so expensive at the resorts, this could definitely be worth it for you.

#8: Bring stuff to do, including your own float. – If you want to get away from it all, and I mean everything, Bora Bora is the place to do it. Because most of the resorts are connected to civilization only through water taxis, this place moves at a ridiculously slow (and relaxing) pace. Bring a few good books, a deck of cards, or some crossword puzzles with you because they’ll cost you a lot more once you hit the resort. I always like bringing my own snorkel mask and flippers as well. You should also consider bringing a water floatie and a rope that you can use to tie to your OWB if you have one!

#9: Book discount excursions ahead of time, or use your rewards to book. – Even if you reach total relaxation mode, you’ll probably want to leave the resort at least once. Consider using points to book any excursions before you leave home. Using the Chase Ultimate Rewards® portal is a good option for finding some great excursions, including the swimming with sharks tour that we booked!

Is Bora Bora on your bucket list? Use these 16 tips to save money in Bora Bora, and your dream vacation may be more affordable than you think!

#10: Skip the souvenirs. – Unless you take the ferry to the main island, shopping is going to be limited to what’s available at your resort. As you might expect, resort prices are typically higher than you might expect. We just decided to skip the souvenirs, save the cash, and take a lot of pictures instead!

#11: Split meals. – Because most of the resorts are so secluded, the available restaurant options are somewhat limited. That also means most of your meals will be at the resort, which you already know are going to be more expensive. Unless you have a meal plan, consider splitting a main course or several appetizers. Doing this, even if it’s just a few times during your stay, can significantly decrease the cost of food on your trip.

#12: Don’t bother with tipping. – Tipping in Bora Bora is not expected or necessary. It’s simply not part of the culture. So, unless somebody really goes way over the top for you, skip the tip and save your cash.

#13: Check for a happy hour at your hotel. – Depending on where you are staying, your hotel bar may have a happy hour or daily drink special. Take advantage of these whenever possible, and save a few bucks along the way.

#14: Travel off peak. – As with any destination, traveling to Bora Bora during the “off season” could potentially save you thousands of dollars. Off peak in Bora Bora is generally considered December through March, with April and November constituting “shoulder” seasons. Although the weather is warm throughout the year, it’s typically a little wetter during these months. Because there are fewer tourists, prices tend to drop as well.

#15: Bring sunscreen and essentials with you. – Remember, once you make it to the resort, you’re pretty much a captive audience. That makes everything more expensive, including things like hats and sunscreen. Be sure to bring plenty of your own with you and you’ll save money.

Is Bora Bora on your bucket list? Use these 16 tips to save money in Bora Bora, and your dream vacation may be more affordable than you think!

#16: Make sure your phone plan works in French Polynesia, or use your hotel’s internet service. – So, this mistake almost cost us $15,000. Yes, you read that right – $15K. Don’t be like us. Before using your cell phone in Bora Bora, be sure that data, talk, and text are covered. Otherwise, consider getting an international SIM card or just using the wifi at your hotel. Trust me, you don’t want to make this mistake.

Final Thoughts

Bora Bora is one of the most beautiful places on the planet, and I can’t wait to go there again. It’s definitely a long haul, and the trip can get very expensive. However, for a special occassion, I think it’s worth it.

Of course, that doesn’t mean you have to pay full price. NO WAY! By using these tips to save money in Bora Bora, your dream vacation may be closer than you think.

Thanks so much for reading. Until next time, happy traveling!

Have you been to Bora Bora? How did you save money? Let us know in the comments below!Is Bora Bora on your bucket list? Use these 16 tips to save money in Bora Bora, and your dream vacation may be more affordable than you think!

The post Yes, You Can Save Money in Bora Bora appeared first on Club Thrifty.

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A Look Back at 2017 + Thoughts on the Upcoming Year

A Space Themed First Birthday Party (Bubby and Bean)

Happy 2018, friends! Welcome to our very first post of the year.

I’ve admittedly never been big on the whole new year thing. I don’t make resolutions, I’m usually a little sad because January starts Robbie’s busy season for being on the road, and since New Year’s Day is also my birthday, I’m usually a little meh in general – because try as I might to be a super empowered bad ass lady who truly believes age is just a number, I’m also old enough where, ya know, turning a year older just doesn’t feel all that great.

All of that said, something about this new year feels different – like a fresh start. Maybe it’s because we move into our new house – and our first official owned home, ever – tomorrow (!!!). Maybe it’s because this holiday season was my most successful as an entrepreneur in many years, and something inside of me is hopeful that this year is going to continue that way (so real life things like bills won’t feel quite so stressful as in years past). Maybe it’s because both 2016 and 2017 were pretty crappy – for much of the world, it seems. Or maybe I just have a different attitude in general. Whatever the reason, I have a lot of faith in 2018. I really do.

And now onto this post and Bubby and Bean! These annual roundups are some of my favorite posts to put together each year. Taking the time to go back and read through the blog for the entire previous year, then select my favorite posts to share, month by month, is almost therapeutic. Sometimes in the day to day I’m so busy with deadlines and projects, and, as work at home mom trying to squeeze it all in when the kids are napping or at school or asleep, that I forget how much I genuinely love what I do. (Side note: I never know how to answer people who ask me what I do for a living. I always feel weird using the word influencer, but blogger feels dated since so much of what I do goes beyond blogging; so I usually say content creator. And people look at me like, ummm? It’s kind of funny.) Any way, even though the vast majority of this job is emails and forms and contracts and applications and negotiations and bookkeeping and a whole lot of social media work (in other worlds, things that aren’t my forte), being able to be creative on some level everyday through writing and photography and other random creative projects is incredibly fulfilling. Being able to share small pieces of my world, and learning more about others’ worlds while I’m at it, is also pretty cool.

Anyway, here we go!

Starting with the top image: In January, I shared Emmett’s spaced themed first birthday party.

Guacamole and Black Bean Pizza (via Bubby and Bean)

This delicious (and super easy) guacamole and black bean pizza was another popular post last January.

One Week Without Sugar

I gave up sugar for a week in February and wrote a little blurb about it here, with the full piece on Prevention Magazine.

Vegan, Plant-Based Nachos, 3 Ways

I ate a lot of plant based foods in 2017. These vegan nachos, prepared in 3 different ways, were one of my favorite snacks.

Salsa Verde, Avocado, + Spinach Quesadillas

And speaking of Mexican inspired food, I shared these St. Patrick’s Day quesadillas in March, which, while not plant based like the nachos, were also a favorite snack last year.

The 15 BEST Items to Get at Trader Joe's

This post from April, on the 15 items I buy most at Trader Joe’s, was one of the most read and shared of 2017.

My little lady and I unintentionally dressed alike and frolicked in the desert during our trip to Arizona in April.

10 Anti-Aging Beauty Hacks

This post on anti-aging hacks I do everyday was also one of our most read posts of the year.

Mango Lemon Prosecco Cocktails with Blueberries

In May, I shared these mango lemon prosecco cocktails (which I drank all summer long),

Our Mama Daughter Bond (+ a $100 Minnetonka Gift Card Giveaway!)

Also in May, in honor of Mother’s Day, I shared some thoughts on E’s and my mama daughter bond (in our cute matching sandals).

8 Creative Uses for Baby Bubble Bath

I had fun putting together this post on 8 creative uses for bubble bath in June.

DIY Personalized Sofia the First Amulet Necklace

We had so much fun putting together these DIY Sofia the First amulet necklaces.

Jasmine Rice, Lentil, and Red Quinoa Tacos

In July I shared the recipe for one of my favorite summer meals, jasmine rice, red lentil, and quinoa tacos.

Our Perfectly Imperfect Mickey Mouse Pancakes

Also in July we shared our tradition of making Mickey Mouse pancakes as a family. So fun.

We spent the day at the zoo in August, and I talked about finding new ways to encourage outdoor play.

How To Put Together A Self Care Package

In September I put together a self care package for my sister (and Essley and I baked some really yummy cookies to put inside).

Also in September, I talked about my attempts at dressing sustainably without sacrificing style.

My Toddler Breast Feeding Journey

I got personal and shared my toddler breastfeeding journey in October.

We had fun decorating our mantel and fireplace area for Halloween.

How To Make You Own Play Dough | Bubby and Bean

We made homemade play dough (and put together our first ever hands only video!).

Family Halloween Costume Ideas

I had to share our unintentionally matching Halloween costumes, of course.

Almond Butter Maple Oatmeal

In November, I made my own nut butter and shared this recipe for almond butter maple oatmeal.

Our Family Dance Parties (& Why Music Is Important To Us)

This post from November on our family dance parties and why music is important to us was our most read of the month.

A Beautiful (and Incredibly Easy) Holiday Snack Spread

In early December, I had way more fun than I probably should have putting together this beautiful but super easy holiday snack spread. (Hey, I love snacks, and if they’re pretty snacks, I’m smitten.)

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

And finally, this post from December on being an older mom was my favorite post to write in 2017.

This will be my eighth year (!) running Bubby and Bean, and boy has blogging changed a lot (like, a lot) along the way, but I’m at a good place with it. I like where things are now, and even though I worked an insane amount of hours the last couple of months of 2017, it’s nice to feel in a groove. That said, I do think some things will be different around here in the upcoming year. For one, as Essley and Emmett get older, I will likely be sharing less and less of them online. I keep 99% of our lives private already, but that 1% might not be fun for them as they get into grade school and learn to use the internet themselves. And until they can express their own opinions about being a part of the blog and my Instagram, I feel more and more of a pull to be cautious. I may write an entire post devoted to this later this month. Stay tuned. I’d also like to take more social media breaks in general this year. This one is tough because social media is a huge part of my job; but it can also be a soul sucker. I took an unintentional week long break from Instagram due to sick kids and other unforeseen circumstances, and it really forced me to realize how much better I feel when I am living in the present, in reality. Overall, I’m excited to see what 2018 brings for Bubby and Bean! Thank you, as always, for supporting us. You are the best readers in the world.

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST //  BLOGLOVIN’
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A Look Back at 2017 + Thoughts on the Upcoming Year

A Space Themed First Birthday Party (Bubby and Bean)

Happy 2018, friends! Welcome to our very first post of the year.

I’ve admittedly never been big on the whole new year thing. I don’t make resolutions, I’m usually a little sad because January starts Robbie’s busy season for being on the road, and since New Year’s Day is also my birthday, I’m usually a little meh in general – because try as I might to be a super empowered bad ass lady who truly believes age is just a number, I’m also old enough where, ya know, turning a year older just doesn’t feel all that great.

All of that said, something about this new year feels different – like a fresh start. Maybe it’s because we move into our new house – and our first official owned home, ever – tomorrow (!!!). Maybe it’s because this holiday season was my most successful as an entrepreneur in many years, and something inside of me is hopeful that this year is going to continue that way (so real life things like bills won’t feel quite so stressful as in years past). Maybe it’s because both 2016 and 2017 were pretty crappy – for much of the world, it seems. Or maybe I just have a different attitude in general. Whatever the reason, I have a lot of faith in 2018. I really do.

And now onto this post and Bubby and Bean! These annual roundups are some of my favorite posts to put together each year. Taking the time to go back and read through the blog for the entire previous year, then select my favorite posts to share, month by month, is almost therapeutic. Sometimes in the day to day I’m so busy with deadlines and projects, and, as work at home mom trying to squeeze it all in when the kids are napping or at school or asleep, that I forget how much I genuinely love what I do. (Side note: I never know how to answer people who ask me what I do for a living. I always feel weird using the word influencer, but blogger feels dated since so much of what I do goes beyond blogging; so I usually say content creator. And people look at me like, ummm? It’s kind of funny.) Any way, even though the vast majority of this job is emails and forms and contracts and applications and negotiations and bookkeeping and a whole lot of social media work (in other worlds, things that aren’t my forte), being able to be creative on some level everyday through writing and photography and other random creative projects is incredibly fulfilling. Being able to share small pieces of my world, and learning more about others’ worlds while I’m at it, is also pretty cool.

Anyway, here we go!

Starting with the top image: In January, I shared Emmett’s spaced themed first birthday party.

Guacamole and Black Bean Pizza (via Bubby and Bean)

This delicious (and super easy) guacamole and black bean pizza was another popular post last January.

One Week Without Sugar

I gave up sugar for a week in February and wrote a little blurb about it here, with the full piece on Prevention Magazine.

Vegan, Plant-Based Nachos, 3 Ways

I ate a lot of plant based foods in 2017. These vegan nachos, prepared in 3 different ways, were one of my favorite snacks.

Salsa Verde, Avocado, + Spinach Quesadillas

And speaking of Mexican inspired food, I shared these St. Patrick’s Day quesadillas in March, which, while not plant based like the nachos, were also a favorite snack last year.

The 15 BEST Items to Get at Trader Joe's

This post from April, on the 15 items I buy most at Trader Joe’s, was one of the most read and shared of 2017.

My little lady and I unintentionally dressed alike and frolicked in the desert during our trip to Arizona in April.

10 Anti-Aging Beauty Hacks

This post on anti-aging hacks I do everyday was also one of our most read posts of the year.

Mango Lemon Prosecco Cocktails with Blueberries

In May, I shared these mango lemon prosecco cocktails (which I drank all summer long),

Our Mama Daughter Bond (+ a $100 Minnetonka Gift Card Giveaway!)

Also in May, in honor of Mother’s Day, I shared some thoughts on E’s and my mama daughter bond (in our cute matching sandals).

8 Creative Uses for Baby Bubble Bath

I had fun putting together this post on 8 creative uses for bubble bath in June.

DIY Personalized Sofia the First Amulet Necklace

We had so much fun putting together these DIY Sofia the First amulet necklaces.

Jasmine Rice, Lentil, and Red Quinoa Tacos

In July I shared the recipe for one of my favorite summer meals, jasmine rice, red lentil, and quinoa tacos.

Our Perfectly Imperfect Mickey Mouse Pancakes

Also in July we shared our tradition of making Mickey Mouse pancakes as a family. So fun.

We spent the day at the zoo in August, and I talked about finding new ways to encourage outdoor play.

How To Put Together A Self Care Package

In September I put together a self care package for my sister (and Essley and I baked some really yummy cookies to put inside).

Also in September, I talked about my attempts at dressing sustainably without sacrificing style.

My Toddler Breast Feeding Journey

I got personal and shared my toddler breastfeeding journey in October.

We had fun decorating our mantel and fireplace area for Halloween.

How To Make You Own Play Dough | Bubby and Bean

We made homemade play dough (and put together our first ever hands only video!).

Family Halloween Costume Ideas

I had to share our unintentionally matching Halloween costumes, of course.

Almond Butter Maple Oatmeal

In November, I made my own nut butter and shared this recipe for almond butter maple oatmeal.

Our Family Dance Parties (& Why Music Is Important To Us)

This post from November on our family dance parties and why music is important to us was our most read of the month.

A Beautiful (and Incredibly Easy) Holiday Snack Spread

In early December, I had way more fun than I probably should have putting together this beautiful but super easy holiday snack spread. (Hey, I love snacks, and if they’re pretty snacks, I’m smitten.)

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

And finally, this post from December on being an older mom was my favorite post to write in 2017.

This will be my eighth year (!) running Bubby and Bean, and boy has blogging changed a lot (like, a lot) along the way, but I’m at a good place with it. I like where things are now, and even though I worked an insane amount of hours the last couple of months of 2017, it’s nice to feel in a groove. That said, I do think some things will be different around here in the upcoming year. For one, as Essley and Emmett get older, I will likely be sharing less and less of them online. I keep 99% of our lives private already, but that 1% might not be fun for them as they get into grade school and learn to use the internet themselves. And until they can express their own opinions about being a part of the blog and my Instagram, I feel more and more of a pull to be cautious. I may write an entire post devoted to this later this month. Stay tuned. I’d also like to take more social media breaks in general this year. This one is tough because social media is a huge part of my job; but it can also be a soul sucker. I took an unintentional week long break from Instagram due to sick kids and other unforeseen circumstances, and it really forced me to realize how much better I feel when I am living in the present, in reality. Overall, I’m excited to see what 2018 brings for Bubby and Bean! Thank you, as always, for supporting us. You are the best readers in the world.

ALSO FIND US HERE: INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST //  BLOGLOVIN’
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A 1800s Shotgun Home Gets a New Lease on Life.

home tour Uncategorized

A 1800s Shotgun Home Gets a New Lease on Life.

This shotgun home that dates back to 1899 is located in Nashville’s historic Germantown neighborhood where it was condemned to demolition. Thankfully interior designer Jason Arnold saved this home and the neighborhood with his design. We love the natural touch of brick, exposed rafters, and antique furniture mixed with modern design and accents. Enjoy the tour!

How gorgeous is this gold range hood?!

Loving the juxtaposition of the gold bed frame against the stark black wall in this bedroom.

This clawfoot tube is so dang adorable! Not sure I would totally fit… but hey its cute!

For more on this home tour, visit Elle Decor.

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A 1800s Shotgun Home Gets a New Lease on Life.

home tour Uncategorized

A 1800s Shotgun Home Gets a New Lease on Life.

This shotgun home that dates back to 1899 is located in Nashville’s historic Germantown neighborhood where it was condemned to demolition. Thankfully interior designer Jason Arnold saved this home and the neighborhood with his design. We love the natural touch of brick, exposed rafters, and antique furniture mixed with modern design and accents. Enjoy the tour!

How gorgeous is this gold range hood?!

Loving the juxtaposition of the gold bed frame against the stark black wall in this bedroom.

This clawfoot tube is so dang adorable! Not sure I would totally fit… but hey its cute!

For more on this home tour, visit Elle Decor.

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Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

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Don’t Take It Personally: How to Handle Criticism

Author don Miguel Ruiz who penned the best seller, The Four Agreements, sagely says, “Don’t take anything personally. Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream. When you are immune to the opinions and actions of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering.”

Easier said than done at times. While it doesn’t mean that we are exempt from correction and re-direction, those who feel a need to hurl critical words often do so because of their own insecurities and world view. What happens when those harsh words echo from within our own cranium?

Scott Kalechstein Grace is a California based singer songwriter whose music is inspired by his personal psycho-spiritual journey, some of which has included addiction and recovery. His song parodies are like that of Weird Al Yankovich. Scott refers to one of the most insidious self-deprecating addictions as ‘critiholism,’; indeed, one to which I and many others I know fall prey.  It reflects the paradoxical poster I saw near the time clock of a place I worked many years ago, that commands, “The beatings will continue until morale improves around here.” I laugh still and use it as an example for my clients who are harshly self-critical. They nod and smile knowingly.

I notice my own chattering mind running amok with thoughts such as, “You should know better, since you are a therapist with a Master’s degree.”  “How come you keep falling into that same pattern of taking on other people’s issues and feeling a need to fix, save, heal, cure and kiss the boo boos to make them all better?” “You need to practice what you preach.” “What will it take for you to finally have it all together?” This last one is said with an exasperated sigh.

What has become increasingly clear is that I still have work to do in that area and that when I am most concerned about what others think about me and especially the work I hold dear, my inner critic becomes embodied in someone else.  Many of the professional hats I wear, beyond that of social worker/therapist are rather unconventional and revolve around the use of healthy, non-sexual touch by consent in the form of a workshop, as well as Laughter Yoga (a modality that is deemed legitimate such that NASW (National Association of Social Workers) offered 16 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) when I took the weekend training.

Over the past few months, whenever I have posted something about either of these topics on social media, inevitably, someone I know professionally has chimed in about how ‘strange, odd, weird, creepy and silly,’ these interests are. This person indicated that they are not befitting the professional they know me to be and can’t understand how I could see them as valid methods of teaching skills in the areas of communication, relationships, boundary setting, assertiveness, childlike playfulness, trust and safely stretching comfort zones. I am clear that although they are not therapy, they do have therapeutic value. Whenever I have attempted to explain the validity and value, the response has been to dig in more deeply, repeating the criticism. When I have suggested that this person step back and re-evaluate the way they express their objection, I am met with a response that sounds like, “When you place something in a public venue, you can expect some disagreement, or do you only want people to agree with everything you say?” It had me pausing and asking a few well-chosen questions: How important is this person’s opinion?  Am I not solid enough in my own estimation of what I do that I put too much stake in what others think? Why do I feel a need to defend my position?

The answers I came up with harken back to the erroneous belief that I had to make everything look good and I needed to be seen as competent and confident to combat childhood asthma and pediatric problems. I was viewed as precocious by the adults in my life and didn’t want to disappoint anyone. It was my own version of ‘the empress has no clothes,’ while I clutched at the invisible garments that were supposed to cover my emotional vulnerability. These days I am far more willing to be transparent, knowing that by doing so, I am exposing myself to external critique.

I am learning to soothe the aspect of myself that I refer to as ‘Perfectionista,’ who seeks approval, both internally and externally.

When inquiring of others how they face their chattering monkey minds, their responses were as diverse as those responding:

“I use deep breathing and the conscious redirection of thoughts and images to focus on. Positive affirmation and moving the body also helps.”

Essential oils/blends. Yoga works great. YouTube meditations a short walk, a conversation with a colleague.”

Lots of internal dialogue, reminding myself of my survival rate thus far (100%), all that I have accomplished (more than the average bear), and that I am clever and smart and can solve anything life throws at me, because so far, I have, and the best predictor of future behavior/ is past behavior/outcome. And I take naps.”

Counting my breaths till my mind calms. Yoga before sitting is essential for me (the whole point of it right!)”

I am not great at meditation, but I am one heck of a visualizer. That is my surest way of quieting monkey mind. I visualize anything that holds my interest at the moment, and then I see it in exquisite detail. Voila, all quiet upstairs. And it has the added benefit of creating something in my mind that may actually get translated in the future to a piece of art, some home decor, a garden design, etc.”

Meditation and journal writing.”

Turn it into a song.”

“I allow the words… Then I add, and I love that about you. I started this years ago and it’s quieted my inner critic. I still do it occasionally, this week it looked like this. “You have gained so much weight… And I love that about you.”

Sit in my car and look at lake at Peace Valley Park.”

Meditation, mantra and Vedic astrology.”

“Let it go let it go let it go.”

“Always get a good night’s sleep and do integral yoga and meditation.”

Learn to observe the chatter rather than having ownership. “

“Review, acknowledge release!!”

“When my chattering mind is going, I consciously change my thoughts, it’s the one thing I do have control over in my life. This could be singing a song, doing a chore or an activity and redirect my thoughts.”

“I can shut mine off at will.”

“I go for a run or bike ride.”

“Of course, we need the little fellow, but when I feel it is getting in the way more than helping, I take a deep breath and send it to bed.”

“Yes… Creative Activity… Physical Activity… Social Activity… Meal Activity.”

“I redirect my mind to gratitude.”

I am willing to tame my inner critic.

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Crime and Punishment: Close-Up on “Brighton Rock”

Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on MUBI. John Boulting’s Brighton Rock (1947) is showing December 23, 2017 – January 22, 2018 on MUBI in the United States. 

There’s a shadow cast over the sun-kissed, seaside resort of Brighton. In 1935, a vulnerable time between two world wars, a noirish stain of violent gangsterdom has contaminated the fun and frivolity of the town’s tourist trade. But that’s largely behind the scenes. In Brighton Rock, a distinctive 1947 British feature, the slums that harbor such murderous criminality are kept under wraps, cloaked by the blinding, warm, soaking sun. Based on Graham Greene’s 1938 novel of the same name, and directed by John Boulting (producing duties went to Boulting brother Roy, though the two would often switch roles for other films), this superb picture discloses with penetrating clarity an emotional street life teeming beneath the veneer of amusement park gaiety.  

This concealed corruption is made semi-public, however, when a newspaper headline proclaims the dubious death of gang boss Kite, recently the subject of a Fred Hale exposé. Kite’s cohorts set their retaliatory sights on the sensational journalist, hoping to punish him for his roundabout connection to the curious casualty. Leading the charge is newly-anointed ringleader Pinkie Brown, played with frighteningly volatile perversion by 24-year-old Richard Attenborough. Given the reigns of the operation, Pinkie asserts himself as a menacing, fidgeting figure, twisting a lock of string and brooding alone in his bedroom, his solemn face augmented by wide, wild eyes. Like a sinister amalgam of Peter Lorre and Alex DeLarge, his odd gaze is neither here nor there; even when speaking directly to someone, he has a way of looking past them, or through them, with crazed detachment. He is cold, paranoid, and tense, his festering capacity for violence barely suppressed by bizarre, tell-tale behavior, like plucking the hair from the head a doll. A second-tier neighborhood goon (he is taunted and haunted by the more influential Colleoni), Pinkie makes up for his moderated status with strangeness and sadism. 

Once the deed is done, and Hale has been suitably disposed of in a frenetically-staged homicide, the hasty coverup begins. While Pinkie and his band perform the murder with relatively determined focus, their ensuing response is considerably less meticulous—perhaps this is why they have never hit the big time. Unwittingly involved in the intrigue is Rose (newcomer Carol Marsh), a sweet teenage café worker who witnesses part of the post-crime conspiracy and grows enamored by Pinkie. “I never forget a face,” she says, acknowledging her insight and sealing her fate. That kindly Rose would somehow accept the brutish hood—and not just accept, but adore—is one of the more perplexing facets of Brighton Rock, but there it is; that’s love. The pathetically pleasant Rose provides the painful heart of the picture. Caught up in an unusual marriage-for-silence scheme, she offers some degree of fleeting promise for Pinkie (who, believe it or not, is also supposed to be a teenager), suggesting through her fidelity that there may be something amiable behind those distressing eyes. Blind to his cruelty, romantically dotty to her detriment, Rose receives the deceptive warmth of Pinkie’s caustic embrace and cautiously enters the fold, an unblemished diamond in the rough. Through the tragic anxiety of her situation, one hopes for a change. She is so pure, so dutiful and devoted that perhaps Pinkie won’t commit to his final solution. Perhaps he isn’t that bad. But he is that bad—that’s why he’s such an engaging monster.

According to Nigel Richardson, writing in The Telegraph, the inexperienced Marsh sought out the role of Rose on the basis of a Boulting advertisement calling for, “one 16- or 17-year-old girl, frail, innocent, naive and tolerably but not excessively pretty….” She may exceed this physical condition (Marsh is effortlessly beautiful), but she certainly achieves the requisite meekness, and when she admitted she had never seen Brighton Rock and “couldn’t bear to,” it’s easy to see why. The devastating pinnacle of the film comes when Rose pleads for Pinkie to record a message for her, so she will always be able to listen to his voice. Entering the private recording booth, he states the following: “What you want me to say is I love you. Well, here is the truth. I hate you, you little slut. You make me sick.” All the while, the camera moves in on her hopeful, heartfelt face, looking in at the man she loves. 

Allegiances in Pinkie’s posse were unstable to begin with, but the haphazard reaction to a steadily-crippling inquisition further tests the loyal constitution of this motley crew. And the presence of meddling Ida Arnold doesn’t help. Attenborough had appeared in a 1944 stage adaptation of Greene’s novel, as did William Hartnell, who plays one of Pinkie’s henchman, and Hermione Baddeley, whose turn as the delightfully uncouth Ida is one of Brighton Rock’s most amusing character qualities. For a brief time, Ida had taken a shine to the hapless Fred Hale, and when he suddenly turns of dead, and his death is attributed to self-inflicted or natural causes, she doesn’t buy the story. Her suspicion is well-founded, of course, and her perseverance is laudable. This boisterous woman, described by Rose as “a big woman with a laugh,” sets off on her own amateur investigation, bringing along her kooky charm and utter lack of pretense (a performer on the Brighton pier, she is at one point still in her clown costume as a lavish fur coat also drapes over her shoulders). Baddeley is an amusingly grounded mediator between the malice of Attenborough and the docility of Marsh.  

John Boulting saw in Greene’s text an additional aspect worth distinguishing in his cinematic reworking: “The setting,” he said, “was not a backdrop; it was one of the characters.” Through the efforts of cinematographer Harry Waxman, whose first feature was Boulting’s 1945 directorial debut, Journey Together, which also starred Attenborough, the bustling Brighton streets come alive with impulsive concentration. In one extended pursuit, Waxman and Boulting survey a vivid, active swath of the city, and by employing hidden cameras, the two were able to maintain a prevailing sense of atmospheric authenticity, securing snapshots of the setting and the impression of its oblivious passersby. The realization of this particular depiction, suited to the needs of the narrative, is a Brighton that is hospitably bright by day, but is blanketed by a night that is dark and foreboding, giving way to figuratively portentous thunderstorms and showers. The picture has a sharp visual intensity, like a straight razor slash to the face; it is shaped by hard, strategic shafts of light, rousing camera movements, and skewed angles, all working to generate spectator positions that bring the previously unseen into ingeniously accomplished view.

Brighton Rock

Released in the United States as “Young Scarface,” Brighton Rock had its roots in real-life Depression-era gangland activity, but arguably more than that, it had its thematic foundation in Greene’s deep-seeded Catholicism, manifest here by pervasive guilt and the predominance of a tortured soul. Tormented by the concepts of hell and damnation, Pinkie seeks an immediate security, one to temporarily satisfy the absence of his ever-lasting salvation. Terrifying close-ups probe this apprehension, isolating the notion that he is destined to suffer for his transgressions. It’s an accepted fatalism that runs throughout Brighton Rock, even existing in the good-humored Ida, who counters Rose’s optimistic contention that, “People change, they repent,” by sincerely arguing, “Oh no they don’t. Look at me.” Though still prominent, the text’s related religious imagery had to be toned down for the film, as did some of the despairing content, namely the concluding scene where, much to the disappointment of Greene, who had it otherwise in his novel, the benevolent Rose does not hear Pinkie’s full recording, but simply a scratched record document of “I love you … I love you … I love you.”  

Still, Brighton Rock is downbeat by any standard, and there was enough about the film’s harsh content to ruffle a few dignified feathers upon its initial release. Take the Daily Mirror’s Reg Whitley, for example, who condemned the picture as, “false, nasty, cheap sensationalism,” making the argument that, “No woman will want to see it. No parents will want their children to see it.” Evoking his spiritual intent, Greene replied to this evaluation with a pointed, entirely accurate rebuttal: “Your critic’s disgust is an indication that one purpose of the film—the presentation of a character possessed by evil— has been successfully achieved.” Indeed it has, and so much more.

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