Box Sets for the Holidays

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Like many JazzWax readers, jazz is my first love. But I also love rock, pop, folk, soul, reggae, bossa nova and anything else that’s great, no matter the genre. If you share my appetite, here are 10 new box sets that I’ve enjoyed and might be ideal as gifts for you or for others on your holiday list (to those about to email me, that’s not my system pictured)…

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The Complete Prestige 10-Inch LP Collection of Thelonious Monk
(Craft). Between 1952 and 1954, Monk recorded 21 songs issued on five 10-inch LPs. The albums were Thelonious Monk Trio: Thelonious (1952), Thelonious Monk Quintet Blows For LP, Featuring Sonny Rollins (1953), Thelonious Monk Quintet (1954), Thelonious Monk Plays (1954), and Sonny Rollins and Thelonious Monk (1954). This set’s five 10-inch LPs include sessions with Sonny Rollins, Max Roach, Art Blakey, Ray Copeland, Frank Foster and Julius Watkins, among others. For some reason, Monk always sounds best on vinyl. Go here.

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David Bowie: A New Career in a New Town (1977-1982)
(Parlophone). This is the third in a series of remastered boxes covering the Thin White Duke’s recording career. This 11-CD box (or 13 vinyl discs) includes Low, Heroes, Lodger, Stage, Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) and Re:Call 3 (a collection of singles) plus new mixes. The first three albums were recorded in Berlin, Stage was recorded on tour and featured his Berlin recordings, Scary Monsters was recorded in New York. Online carping about the box’s mastering are addressed here. (Go here)

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Johnny Mathis: The Voice of Romance. The Columbia Original Album Collection
(Sony Legacy). This 68-CD "cinder block" set includes all of Johnny’s 67 albums plus his new Johnny Mathis Sings The Great New American Songbook. The box features a 200-page booklet with notes and photos. I had a chance to interview Johnny recently. He’s a wonderful-wonderful, friendly guy, as you might imagine. (Go here)

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Jazz Cosmopolit: Swedish Jazz History Vol 11 (1970-1979)
(Caprice). As you can tell from the volume number of this set, Sweden has produced its share of great jazz recordings. The music on this set is wide-ranging from hard bop to ballads but nearly always beautiful and pensive. You can sample tracks here. (Go here)

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Elvis Presley: A Boy From Tupelo—The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings (Sony Legacy).
This three-CD set allows you to hear the early evolution of an artist in the innocent years prior to his electrifying emergence as a national phenomenon in ’56. Good looks and a captivating delivery were only part of the story. Presley worked tirelessly touring and winning over crowds during these years. The set includes a 122-page book with photos, notes and recording details. (Go here).

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Bob Dylan: Trouble Me No More. The Bootleg Series Vol 13 (1979-1981)
(Sony Legacy). Someone who was born on the day Sony released its first Bob Dylan bootleg set would be 26 today. The recordings in volume 13 cover much of Dylan’s born-again Christian years. His studio albums of the period were Slow Train Coming (1979), Saved (1980) and Shot of Love (1981). The material on this set consists mostly of live recordings as well as unreleased session demos and outtakes from the three studio albums cited above. As always, Sony does a terrific job archiving, researching and packaging Dylan’s work-product over three narrow years. (Go here for the two-CD set and here for the 8-CD/1-DVD deluxe set). 

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Woody Guthrie: The Tribute Concerts
(Bear Family).
When Woody Guthrie died in 1967, folk lost its founder. To pay tribute to Guthrie, whose dusty songs of Depression-era injustice and hardship, folk artists who had been inspired by him gathered for two concerts—one at Carnegie Hall in 1968 and another at the Hollywood Bowl in 1970. Now Germany’s Bear Family has issued a three-CD box featuring the two concerts plus newly released material that never made it onto the original releases in 1972. Artists include Judy Collins, Bob Dylan, Richie Havens, Arlo Guthrie, Tom Paxton, Pete Seeger and Odetta as well as Ry Cooder, Rambln’ Jack Elliott and many others. (Go here)  

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The Eagles: Hotel California, 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition
(Asylum).
When this album was first released in December 1976, disco was on the rise. For those uninterested in the hustle and didn’t care much for urban dance floors in general, Hotel California became a folk-rock alternative. The album was No. 1 for eight weeks and won two Grammy Awards. The line-up of songs on the album was staggering (the first three are Hotel California, New Kid in Town and Life in the Fast Lane). This anniversary set includes a remastering of the original album. The second CD features 10 live tracks recorded during the band’s three nights at the Los Angeles Forum in 1976. The deluxe edition includes a DVD. (Go here). 

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The Ramones: Rocket to Russia, 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition
(Rhino).
In November 1977, the Ramones released their third studio album, Rocket to Russia. It would become the last album featuring all four founding members, since drummer Tommy Ramone left soon after. Songs include Rockaway Beach, Sheena Is a Punk Rocker and Teenage Lobotomy. (Go here)

       

Source: http://www.JazzWax.com/

10 Powerful Quotes on Overcoming Adversity (and a Book Giveaway)

As the year is coming to a close, now seems like a perfect time to shine a spotlight on one of my favorite books of 2017.

Tiny Buddha contributor Harriet Cabelly has crafted a masterpiece in her book Living Well Despite Adversity: Inspiration for Finding Renewed Meaning and Joy in Your Life.

Harriet’s faced her share of personal challenges in life, from going through a life-threatening medical crisis with her daughter to rebuilding her life after divorce. But this book isn’t just about her own journey. It features interviews with dozens of people who’ve learned to thrive despite illness, loss, and other tragedies.

Uplifting and empowering, Living Well Despite Adversity offers hope and inspiration for anyone who’s struggling in life.

The stories are raw, the lessons powerful, and the messages universal. While some of the names are well known—including Cheryl Strayed and Meredith Viera—many were new to me; and I couldn’t have been more grateful for the chance to learn a little about their journeys and what’s helped them heal and grow.

I’ve shared below some of my favorite quotes from the book, but first…

The Giveaway

Harriet has generously offered to provide two copies of Living Well Despite Adversity to Tiny Buddha readers. To enter the giveaway:

  • Leave a comment below. You don’t have to write anything specific. ”Count me in” is sufficient. But if you feel inclined, please share your favorite quote on overcoming adversity or something that’s helped you get through tough times.
  • For an extra entry, share this giveaway on one of your social media pages and post the link in a second comment.

You can enter until midnight, PST, on Monday, December 17th.

The Quotes

From Michael Hingson, who was born blind, later survived 9-11 with the help of his guide dog, and then wrote the bestselling memoir Thunder Dog:

“If I were to suggest to other people what they ‘should’ do if they’re going through a tragedy or any kind of unexpected change I would say you must start with accepting the fact that the change happened, especially if you didn’t have control over it. And even if you did and it took an unexpected turn where you were left in a quandary, you must start with ‘All right, where am I?’ Get over the fact that it happened—‘Now where do I go from here?’ I don’t care what the challenge is, we all can start with that.”

From Amy Morin, who lost her mother, husband, and father-in-law in quick succession and then wrote the book 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do:

“It’s tempting to try to avoid the sadness and distress associated with grief—but if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you have to face your emotions head-on. Other people will try to cheer you up because they’re uncomfortable with you being sad, but let yourself feel sad and angry and lonely. Time doesn’t heal anything. It’s what you do with that time that matters. So it’s important to use your time to heal—and part of healing means experiencing a wide variety of emotions. And don’t be afraid to ask for help from friends, family, and professionals. Your connections with other people can make all the difference in the world.”

From Natalie Taylor, who lost her husband, Josh, while pregnant with their first child:

“One thing I try to say to myself when I hit a bad patch is this idea that ‘it will pass.’ I won’t feel this way the whole day or the whole week. So I sort of embrace it and go through it because it will pass. It’s not that I ignore it. When I do get sad I remind myself that I’ll be happy again, eventually, or I’ll do something else in the day that will make me happy. I just know that things change quickly, although with grief they don’t change so quickly. At this point, four years out, my day-to-day attitude is so much more positive than it was three or four years ago obviously.

From Meredith Viera, journalist, TV personality, and caregiver to her husband Richard Cohen, who’s been living with MS for more than thirty years:

“Build that group of friends, that support system around you. Go for it. Don’t be afraid. Don’t feel that you’re a burden to other people. And don’t be ashamed of illness. What you’ll discover is everybody else has their own thing. People don’t like to talk about stuff. They hide it, but if you’re open and you say you need help, people will be there for you. It’s important to know they’re there. It’s like it takes a village; when there’s illness it takes a village too. Most people have been phenomenal.”

From Laverne Bissky, who started the No Ordinary Journey Foundation to help children, like her daughter, who struggle with Cerebral Palsy:

“For me coping is about balance: not static balance but dynamic balance because life is always in a state of flux. It’s about knowing when to push hard and when to rest. When to fight and when to let go. When to use and when to conserve resources. When to work hard and when to have fun. Practicing mindfulness helps me to know when to shift between these. It’s about paying attention to what is going on inside of you.”

From Natasha Alexenko, sexual assault survivor and founder of Natasha’s Justice Project, whose mission is to ensure rape kits are tested and investigated quickly:

“You don’t always have to be productive. You’re biggest responsibility is to yourself and making sure you’re OK. If you are not feeling well emotionally or mentally, you should treat yourself almost like you’re ill. If you had a cold you wouldn’t necessarily mop your floors or do your laundry. You’re allowed to take a moment to smell the roses and not be hard on yourself.”

From Julie Genovese, who wrote the memoir Nothing Short of Joy to share her story of living with a physically and emotionally challenging form of dwarfism:

“I didn’t realize I had a choice of how to see my challenges. When I turned it around to see those challenges as adventures or as mountains to climb so that I could see a fantastic view, my attitude changed; that shift in perspective would change all of it. I realized I did have more of this inner divine power than I had realized in the past. It’s a universal quality that keeps us moving forward. It’s that desire to be our own truth, to be our whole self. We are all born into these different handicaps, visible or invisible, and they are the catalyst to wake us up and remind us that we came here for growth and awareness. Our hardship and struggles are that springboard to appreciate what we can have here if we look at it differently, or if we experience it with new senses—like jumping into a pool after a horribly hot day is ten times better than jumping into a pool every day when you’ve never really gotten hot. As humans we have these catalysts to keep prodding us forward and to keep remembering there’s a greater and more beautiful truth than maybe what we’re living.”

From Dr. Daniel Gottlieb, psychologist, author, radio show host, who’s been paraplegic since a car accident three decades ago:

“When I’m in a dark hole, I want someone who loves me enough to sit there next to me and not tell me there’s light on the other side. Words are not going to do anything and 90% of the time they’re going to be patronizing. They’re also going to be a byproduct of your own anxiety and helplessness. Just sit with me. Just have the courage to try to fathom what I’m experiencing.”

From Judy Shephard, who lost her son to an anti-gay hate crime and then founded the Matthew Shephard Foundation to help erase hate:

“In my personal experience, as well as that of many very close friends and family members, you don’t ‘emerge.’ The darkness is always there; it just gets different. It becomes something you can look at with some objectivity. We still have joy and happiness in our lives; it’s just different. At least, that is what it has been for my family to date. My advice is not to let anyone tell you the accepted time limit for grief—it is limitless. That being said, it must also become something you embrace rather than fear. We’ve encouraged our friends and family to still share memories of Matt, not to shy away from remembering him. He will always be a part of our lives and that is a good thing.”

From Julia Fox Garrison, stroke survivor and author of the memoir Don’t Leave Me This Way:

“I think we are conditioned to say the word ‘can’t’ which closes all doors to possibilities. I have discovered that if you include the word ‘yet’ then the door to opportunity remains ajar. I used to say ‘can’t’ so often that it became second nature in conversation. Now I avoid saying ‘can’t’, but when I need to say it, I always include the qualifier, ‘yet’. So I can’t rollerblade yet, but I plan on it someday, maybe.”

You can learn more about Living Well Despite Adversity: Inspiration for Finding Renewed Meaning and Joy in Your Life on Amazon here.

FTC Disclosure: I receive complimentary books for reviews and interviews on tinybuddha.com, but I am not compensated for writing or obligated to write anything specific. I am an Amazon affiliate, meaning I earn a percentage of all books purchased through the links I provide on this site. 

About Lori Deschene

Lori Deschene is the founder of Tiny Buddha and Recreate Your Life Story, an online course that helps you let go of the past and live a life you love. Her latest bookTiny Buddha’s Gratitude Journal, which includes 15 coloring pages, is now available for purchase. For daily wisdom, follow Tiny Buddha on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram..

Get in the conversation! Click here to leave a comment on the site.

The post 10 Powerful Quotes on Overcoming Adversity (and a Book Giveaway) appeared first on Tiny Buddha.

Source: https://tinybuddha.com

10 Powerful Quotes on Overcoming Adversity (and a Book Giveaway)

As the year is coming to a close, now seems like a perfect time to shine a spotlight on one of my favorite books of 2017.

Tiny Buddha contributor Harriet Cabelly has crafted a masterpiece in her book Living Well Despite Adversity: Inspiration for Finding Renewed Meaning and Joy in Your Life.

Harriet’s faced her share of personal challenges in life, from going through a life-threatening medical crisis with her daughter to rebuilding her life after divorce. But this book isn’t just about her own journey. It features interviews with dozens of people who’ve learned to thrive despite illness, loss, and other tragedies.

Uplifting and empowering, Living Well Despite Adversity offers hope and inspiration for anyone who’s struggling in life.

The stories are raw, the lessons powerful, and the messages universal. While some of the names are well known—including Cheryl Strayed and Meredith Viera—many were new to me; and I couldn’t have been more grateful for the chance to learn a little about their journeys and what’s helped them heal and grow.

I’ve shared below some of my favorite quotes from the book, but first…

The Giveaway

Harriet has generously offered to provide two copies of Living Well Despite Adversity to Tiny Buddha readers. To enter the giveaway:

  • Leave a comment below. You don’t have to write anything specific. ”Count me in” is sufficient. But if you feel inclined, please share your favorite quote on overcoming adversity or something that’s helped you get through tough times.
  • For an extra entry, share this giveaway on one of your social media pages and post the link in a second comment.

You can enter until midnight, PST, on Monday, December 17th.

The Quotes

From Michael Hingson, who was born blind, later survived 9-11 with the help of his guide dog, and then wrote the bestselling memoir Thunder Dog:

“If I were to suggest to other people what they ‘should’ do if they’re going through a tragedy or any kind of unexpected change I would say you must start with accepting the fact that the change happened, especially if you didn’t have control over it. And even if you did and it took an unexpected turn where you were left in a quandary, you must start with ‘All right, where am I?’ Get over the fact that it happened—‘Now where do I go from here?’ I don’t care what the challenge is, we all can start with that.”

From Amy Morin, who lost her mother, husband, and father-in-law in quick succession and then wrote the book 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do:

“It’s tempting to try to avoid the sadness and distress associated with grief—but if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you have to face your emotions head-on. Other people will try to cheer you up because they’re uncomfortable with you being sad, but let yourself feel sad and angry and lonely. Time doesn’t heal anything. It’s what you do with that time that matters. So it’s important to use your time to heal—and part of healing means experiencing a wide variety of emotions. And don’t be afraid to ask for help from friends, family, and professionals. Your connections with other people can make all the difference in the world.”

From Natalie Taylor, who lost her husband, Josh, while pregnant with their first child:

“One thing I try to say to myself when I hit a bad patch is this idea that ‘it will pass.’ I won’t feel this way the whole day or the whole week. So I sort of embrace it and go through it because it will pass. It’s not that I ignore it. When I do get sad I remind myself that I’ll be happy again, eventually, or I’ll do something else in the day that will make me happy. I just know that things change quickly, although with grief they don’t change so quickly. At this point, four years out, my day-to-day attitude is so much more positive than it was three or four years ago obviously.

From Meredith Viera, journalist, TV personality, and caregiver to her husband Richard Cohen, who’s been living with MS for more than thirty years:

“Build that group of friends, that support system around you. Go for it. Don’t be afraid. Don’t feel that you’re a burden to other people. And don’t be ashamed of illness. What you’ll discover is everybody else has their own thing. People don’t like to talk about stuff. They hide it, but if you’re open and you say you need help, people will be there for you. It’s important to know they’re there. It’s like it takes a village; when there’s illness it takes a village too. Most people have been phenomenal.”

From Laverne Bissky, who started the No Ordinary Journey Foundation to help children, like her daughter, who struggle with Cerebral Palsy:

“For me coping is about balance: not static balance but dynamic balance because life is always in a state of flux. It’s about knowing when to push hard and when to rest. When to fight and when to let go. When to use and when to conserve resources. When to work hard and when to have fun. Practicing mindfulness helps me to know when to shift between these. It’s about paying attention to what is going on inside of you.”

From Natasha Alexenko, sexual assault survivor and founder of Natasha’s Justice Project, whose mission is to ensure rape kits are tested and investigated quickly:

“You don’t always have to be productive. You’re biggest responsibility is to yourself and making sure you’re OK. If you are not feeling well emotionally or mentally, you should treat yourself almost like you’re ill. If you had a cold you wouldn’t necessarily mop your floors or do your laundry. You’re allowed to take a moment to smell the roses and not be hard on yourself.”

From Julie Genovese, who wrote the memoir Nothing Short of Joy to share her story of living with a physically and emotionally challenging form of dwarfism:

“I didn’t realize I had a choice of how to see my challenges. When I turned it around to see those challenges as adventures or as mountains to climb so that I could see a fantastic view, my attitude changed; that shift in perspective would change all of it. I realized I did have more of this inner divine power than I had realized in the past. It’s a universal quality that keeps us moving forward. It’s that desire to be our own truth, to be our whole self. We are all born into these different handicaps, visible or invisible, and they are the catalyst to wake us up and remind us that we came here for growth and awareness. Our hardship and struggles are that springboard to appreciate what we can have here if we look at it differently, or if we experience it with new senses—like jumping into a pool after a horribly hot day is ten times better than jumping into a pool every day when you’ve never really gotten hot. As humans we have these catalysts to keep prodding us forward and to keep remembering there’s a greater and more beautiful truth than maybe what we’re living.”

From Dr. Daniel Gottlieb, psychologist, author, radio show host, who’s been paraplegic since a car accident three decades ago:

“When I’m in a dark hole, I want someone who loves me enough to sit there next to me and not tell me there’s light on the other side. Words are not going to do anything and 90% of the time they’re going to be patronizing. They’re also going to be a byproduct of your own anxiety and helplessness. Just sit with me. Just have the courage to try to fathom what I’m experiencing.”

From Judy Shephard, who lost her son to an anti-gay hate crime and then founded the Matthew Shephard Foundation to help erase hate:

“In my personal experience, as well as that of many very close friends and family members, you don’t ‘emerge.’ The darkness is always there; it just gets different. It becomes something you can look at with some objectivity. We still have joy and happiness in our lives; it’s just different. At least, that is what it has been for my family to date. My advice is not to let anyone tell you the accepted time limit for grief—it is limitless. That being said, it must also become something you embrace rather than fear. We’ve encouraged our friends and family to still share memories of Matt, not to shy away from remembering him. He will always be a part of our lives and that is a good thing.”

From Julia Fox Garrison, stroke survivor and author of the memoir Don’t Leave Me This Way:

“I think we are conditioned to say the word ‘can’t’ which closes all doors to possibilities. I have discovered that if you include the word ‘yet’ then the door to opportunity remains ajar. I used to say ‘can’t’ so often that it became second nature in conversation. Now I avoid saying ‘can’t’, but when I need to say it, I always include the qualifier, ‘yet’. So I can’t rollerblade yet, but I plan on it someday, maybe.”

You can learn more about Living Well Despite Adversity: Inspiration for Finding Renewed Meaning and Joy in Your Life on Amazon here.

FTC Disclosure: I receive complimentary books for reviews and interviews on tinybuddha.com, but I am not compensated for writing or obligated to write anything specific. I am an Amazon affiliate, meaning I earn a percentage of all books purchased through the links I provide on this site. 

About Lori Deschene

Lori Deschene is the founder of Tiny Buddha and Recreate Your Life Story, an online course that helps you let go of the past and live a life you love. Her latest bookTiny Buddha’s Gratitude Journal, which includes 15 coloring pages, is now available for purchase. For daily wisdom, follow Tiny Buddha on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram..

Get in the conversation! Click here to leave a comment on the site.

The post 10 Powerful Quotes on Overcoming Adversity (and a Book Giveaway) appeared first on Tiny Buddha.

Source: https://tinybuddha.com

“Call Me By Your Name” Leads Chicago Film Critics Nominations

“Call Me By Your Name” Leads Chicago Film Critics Nominations

The Chicago Film Critics Association—of which Brian Tallerico is the Vice President and Chaz Ebert, Matt Fagerholm, Nick Allen, and Peter Sobczynski are members, among other regular contributors—announced their nominees today for the best films of 2017. Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name” led all nominees with eight nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Editing, Best Actor, Breakthrough Performer, and two nominations for Best Supporting Actor. Guillermo Del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” was close behind with seven nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Original Screenplay, Best Art Direction, Best Original Score, and Best Cinematography. The other three nominees for Best Picture are “Dunkirk” “Lady Bird,” and “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

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Greta Gerwig and Jordan Peele both pulled off a rare trifecta, landing nominations for Best Director, Best Original Screenplay and Breakthrough Filmmaker. Other interesting nominees this year include a trio of nods for the cast of “Phantom Thread” (Daniel Day-Lewis, Vicky Krieps and Lesley Manville), two acting nominations for Netflix’s “Mudbound” (Mary J. Blige and Jason Mitchell), and a nod for Harry Dean Stanton’s final performance in John Carroll Lynch’s “Lucky.” The full list of nominees is below:

BEST PICTURE
Call Me By Your Name
Dunkirk
Lady Bird
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

BEST DIRECTOR
Guillermo Del Toro, The Shape of Water
Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name
Christopher Nolan, Dunkirk
Jordan Peele, Get Out

BEST ACTRESS
Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
Vicky Krieps, Phantom Thread
Frances McDormand, Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird

BEST ACTOR
Timothee Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
James Franco, The Disaster Artist
Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Harry Dean Stanton, Lucky

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Holly Hunter, The Big Sick
Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Armie Hammer, Call Me By Your Name
Jason Mitchell, Mudbound
Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
Michael Stuhlbarg, Call Me By Your Name

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Blade Runner 2049
Call My By Your Name
The Disaster Artist
Logan
Mudbound

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
The Big Sick
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

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BEST ANIMATED FILM
The Breadwinner
Coco
The LEGO Batman Movie
Loving Vincent
Your Name

BEST DOCUMENTARY
Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
City of Ghosts
Ex Libris: New York Public Library
Faces Places
Jane
Kedi

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
BPM (Beats Per Minute)
A Fantastic Woman
Loveless
Raw
The Square

BEST ART DIRECTION
Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water

BEST EDITING
Baby Driver
Call Me By Your Name
Dunkirk
The Florida Project
Get Out

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
War For the Planet of the Apes

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Florida Project
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMER
Timothee Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Dafne Keen, Logan
Jessie Pinnick, Princess Cyd
Brooklynn Prince, The Florida Project
Florence Pugh, Lady Macbeth
Bria Vinaite, The Florida Project

BREAKTHROUGH FILMMAKER
Kogonada, Columbus
Jordan Peele, Get Out
Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
John Carroll Lynch, Lucky
Julia Ducournau, Raw

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“Call Me By Your Name” Leads Chicago Film Critics Nominations

“Call Me By Your Name” Leads Chicago Film Critics Nominations

The Chicago Film Critics Association—of which Brian Tallerico is the Vice President and Chaz Ebert, Matt Fagerholm, Nick Allen, and Peter Sobczynski are members, among other regular contributors—announced their nominees today for the best films of 2017. Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name” led all nominees with eight nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Editing, Best Actor, Breakthrough Performer, and two nominations for Best Supporting Actor. Guillermo Del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” was close behind with seven nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Original Screenplay, Best Art Direction, Best Original Score, and Best Cinematography. The other three nominees for Best Picture are “Dunkirk” “Lady Bird,” and “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

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Greta Gerwig and Jordan Peele both pulled off a rare trifecta, landing nominations for Best Director, Best Original Screenplay and Breakthrough Filmmaker. Other interesting nominees this year include a trio of nods for the cast of “Phantom Thread” (Daniel Day-Lewis, Vicky Krieps and Lesley Manville), two acting nominations for Netflix’s “Mudbound” (Mary J. Blige and Jason Mitchell), and a nod for Harry Dean Stanton’s final performance in John Carroll Lynch’s “Lucky.” The full list of nominees is below:

BEST PICTURE
Call Me By Your Name
Dunkirk
Lady Bird
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

BEST DIRECTOR
Guillermo Del Toro, The Shape of Water
Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name
Christopher Nolan, Dunkirk
Jordan Peele, Get Out

BEST ACTRESS
Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
Vicky Krieps, Phantom Thread
Frances McDormand, Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird

BEST ACTOR
Timothee Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
James Franco, The Disaster Artist
Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Harry Dean Stanton, Lucky

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Holly Hunter, The Big Sick
Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Armie Hammer, Call Me By Your Name
Jason Mitchell, Mudbound
Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
Michael Stuhlbarg, Call Me By Your Name

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Blade Runner 2049
Call My By Your Name
The Disaster Artist
Logan
Mudbound

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
The Big Sick
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

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BEST ANIMATED FILM
The Breadwinner
Coco
The LEGO Batman Movie
Loving Vincent
Your Name

BEST DOCUMENTARY
Abacus: Small Enough to Jail
City of Ghosts
Ex Libris: New York Public Library
Faces Places
Jane
Kedi

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
BPM (Beats Per Minute)
A Fantastic Woman
Loveless
Raw
The Square

BEST ART DIRECTION
Beauty and the Beast
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water

BEST EDITING
Baby Driver
Call Me By Your Name
Dunkirk
The Florida Project
Get Out

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water
War For the Planet of the Apes

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Blade Runner 2049
Dunkirk
The Florida Project
Mudbound
The Shape of Water

BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMER
Timothee Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Dafne Keen, Logan
Jessie Pinnick, Princess Cyd
Brooklynn Prince, The Florida Project
Florence Pugh, Lady Macbeth
Bria Vinaite, The Florida Project

BREAKTHROUGH FILMMAKER
Kogonada, Columbus
Jordan Peele, Get Out
Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
John Carroll Lynch, Lucky
Julia Ducournau, Raw

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6 Gifts of Borderline Personality Disorder

I was twenty-four-years-old on my way to a residential treatment center in Chicago for an eating disorder when I got what I thought was devastating news that I had borderline personality disorder (BPD). When BPD hit my brain I lashed out inside. “Not another diagnosis,” I screamed while lines of thoughts trailed rapidly through my head. These thoughts came in all shapes and sizes. Some thoughts of abandonment flew by, other thoughts of suicidal ideation zoomed by. My mood was up and down like I was on a roller coaster, and not the kiddy one. I was a lost soul living in a world of self-destructive torment where everything was wrong. I felt lonely. My body, to me, looked like an inflated balloon. And I felt abandoned, even though I had a loving, supportive family, friends, and support team.

Since that fall afternoon walk with my therapist, when we discussed why I had BPD, I started to understand that having BPD was not a bad thing but a gift. It answered so many questions of why my mood and thought processes were the way they were. It has helped make me a stronger person.

The 6 Gifts of BPD:

  1. Some days I go through what seems like 100 different emotions. In one moment I’m lonely, the next moment I’m a mixture of angry and lonely with anxiety swimming up my body. Going through all of these moods has created a type of resilience and strength that can’t be explained. It’s almost like you’re Superwoman riding on a magical-like unicorn that says you are strong. This “magical” like quality makes up your resilience.  
  2. I have these unpleasant thoughts of imagined abandonment. It makes me appreciate more the fact that I’m loved by my family and friends — because I’m only imagining the abandonment. However, there are moments where I still feel abandoned, like I am adopted.
  3. Compassion comes without saying. Dealing with BPD has made me realize how I can use my gifts to help others. Whether I say “you look great in your swim suit” to someone in a gym locker room or just brightening someone’s day with a little art therapy. It also has influenced my professional life, too. It makes me understand what my clients are going through and feel for them.
  4. My treasure chest is overflowing with coping solutions, from dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) to self-care. These helped me become more self-reliant. I also like to rely on experiential therapies like art and yoga to help me conquer my BPD.
  5. I relish pleasant days more and more. A cloud in the sky that seems so ordinary puts a smile on my face, as I sing to the “Fight Song” by Rachel Platten. These days just paint a smile on my face.
  6. On days where I am overwhelmed with emotions I have learned to live in the moment. To make the most of chores and errands by singing to myself, listening to an audio book, or just chatting with a friend. I find that by listening to an audiobook that teaches me something I feel that I am doing something to help myself and others.

When you meet someone with BPD don’t be scared of all the emotions they present, instead look at all the gifts their diagnosis has given to them, which that they can share with you and others. Learn from them as they learn from you, and the world will grow as you grow. Without learning from others we will stay stagnant.

Strength comes in all shapes and sizes. My strength comes from all that I have overcome. Maybe your strengths come from work, school, sports, or just life’s daily little messes. Whatever they are, they make you stronger just like BPD makes me stronger.

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