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Screens 4

Screens 4

Earlier this summer, Screens was updated to version 4. So what’s new in version 4? The biggest enhancement for me is drag and drop file transfers between Macs. I use Screens to access several remote Macs, and this is a great feature. Rather than having to sync the file via Dropbox or some other method, I can just drop it right from the host Mac.

There is also an updated user interface, Touch Bar support, and a new Curtain Mode that will blank out the display on remote Macs if you want to hide what you are doing.

Screens 4 is a paid upgrade. You can buy it for $29.99 on the Mac App Store. Existing customers can get a discount off the upgrade by visiting the developer’s website. If you purchased Screens 3 after January 31, 2017, version 4 is free.

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Source: http://toolsandtoys.net

Here’s How to Beat Narcissists at Their Own Game

Beat them at their own game.

Don’t employ these four positive character traits when you’re in love with, work for, were parented by, or are friends (frenemies) with a narcissist. These are admirable and useful traits when offered to “normal” people who don’t have the traits that typify a narcissist:

Early Warning Signs That The Person You’re In Love With Is A Narcissist

  • An abundance of empathy.
  • A strong desire to rescue and help.
  • A willingness to try harder to make the relationship work.
  • A strong sense of responsibility.

On the other end of the spectrum are the traits of a narcissist:

  • Interpersonally exploitative.
  • Lacking empathy: unwilling or unable to recognize the feelings and needs of others.
  • Negative reaction to criticism (they can interpret us asking to have our needs met as criticism).
  • Difficulty in admitting mistakes or taking responsibility for their bad behavior.
  • Using fear to control people.

An example of how not to act around a narcissist comes from my long-ago narcissistic relationship:

My live-in boyfriend didn’t come until 7 AM from a “boys night out.” I was prepared to have it out with him. Get him to admit that he was cheating so I’d have the proof I needed to break up with him. Instead, he came home and grilled me. Did I call his friend Colin at 4 AM to find out where he was? (Controlling me by making me fearful I’d done something wrong.) Yes, I did call Colin.

My strong misplaced sense of responsibility kicked in. I began to doubt. Maybe it was my fault he stayed out all night because I was always trying to track him down? It’s no wonder, he said, that he couldn’t commit to a woman who behaves like “white trash.” If I could just trust him, he said, and quit trying to control him, his bad behavior would stop.

My abundance of empathy and need to try harder kicked in. I forgave him for staying out all night because maybe I was a shrew who made him want to rebel.

So, I’d just have to try harder to put up with his inconsistency, unreliability and (if I could set denial aside) his infidelities. And since he was tired from his night out he “really didn’t want to discuss our relationship right then.” (My desire to rescue and help kicked in and I let him off the hook. At least I didn’t make him breakfast!)

Unbelievable Memories Of Growing Up With A Narcissistic Mother

And don’t let passion blind you to reason! Our sexual organs often don’t care if our lover is a narcissist. So, how can you protect yourself when you’re in a relationship with someone like this? By learning how not to act around a narcissist who uses your positive character traits against you.

  1. Learn all the narcissistic personality traits in a location on your body where you can see them (for me it would be my tummy).
  2. Get into recovery for co-dependency (Twelve-step recovery is amazing).
  3. Use emotional detachment to stop trying to manipulate, rescue, fix or people-please the narcissist.
  4. Never reveal what hurts you or makes you feel vulnerable to a narcissist​​.

Dr. Athena Staik Ph.D. writes, “Expressing vulnerable emotions is vital to life balance and peace of mind, but do so only with safe others — never a narcissist. A narcissist literally uses this information to get into your mind, instilling fear to steal your sense of self, by crippling your brain’s capacity to clearly think. That means, while you’re pouring your heart and spilling your guts, the narcissist you’re talking to, like a mad scientist, listens only to gather data… to execute strategies to exploit and take possession of your mind, heart, soul for his (her) gain alone.”

This guest article originally appeared on YourTango.com: The 4 Personality Traits Narcissists Take Advantage Of (And How To Hide Them).

Source: http://ift.tt/2jgn2Ba

Follow the Money in New Official Trailer for Fabien Dufils’ Film ‘1 Buck’

Follow the Money in New Official Trailer for Fabien Dufils’ Film ‘1 Buck’

by
August 31, 2017
Source: YouTube

“Here, a good luck charm.” Gravitas Ventures has debuted the trailer for the indie film 1 Buck, from filmmaker Fabien Dufils, telling the story of one dollar bill as it travels ’round a forgotten town in Louisiana. Yes, crazy enough, the concept for this is to follow a dirty dollar as it travels from person to person, pocket to pocket, getting in trouble and paying for things. The cast includes John Freeman, Katie Lynne Ryan, Cassi Colvin, Will Green, River Faught, and Darren Kendrick. This looks a bit over-the-top in terms of the depravity and crime, but so be it. Not really sure this is worth a watch, despite the dollar bill concept.

Here’s the official trailer (+ poster) for Fabien Dufils’ 1 Buck, direct from Gravitas’ YouTube:

VIDEO

1 Buck Movie Poster

If money could talk… Shifting from one pocket to another, from one man’s drama to another, is a lowly dollar bill. 1 Buck takes us on an odyssey through the heart of a forgotten town in Louisiana. 1 Buck is both written and directed by up-and-coming French filmmaker Fabien Dufils, making his feature directorial debut after a number of short films and music videos previously. This has already premiered at a few film festivals around the world earlier this year. Gravitas Ventures will release Dufils’ 1 Buck in select theaters + on VOD starting September 22nd this fall. Anyone interested in seeing this film? So what do you think?

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Follow the Money in New Official Trailer for Fabien Dufils’ Film ‘1 Buck’

1 Buck Trailer

"Here, a good luck charm." Gravitas Ventures has debuted the trailer for the indie film 1 Buck, from filmmaker Fabien Dufils, telling the story of one dollar bill as it travels ’round a forgotten town in Louisiana. Yes, crazy enough, the concept for this is to follow a dirty dollar as it travels from person to person, pocket to pocket, getting in trouble and paying for things. The cast includes John Freeman, Katie Lynne Ryan, Cassi Colvin, Will Green, River Faught, and Darren Kendrick. This looks a bit over-the-top in terms of the depravity and crime, but so be it. Not really sure this is worth a watch, despite the dollar bill concept.

Here’s the official trailer (+ poster) for Fabien Dufils’ 1 Buck, direct from Gravitas’ YouTube:

1 Buck Movie Poster

If money could talk… Shifting from one pocket to another, from one man’s drama to another, is a lowly dollar bill. 1 Buck takes us on an odyssey through the heart of a forgotten town in Louisiana. 1 Buck is both written and directed by up-and-coming French filmmaker Fabien Dufils, making his feature directorial debut after a number of short films and music videos previously. This has already premiered at a few film festivals around the world earlier this year. Gravitas Ventures will release Dufils’ 1 Buck in select theaters + on VOD starting September 22nd this fall. Anyone interested in seeing this film? So what do you think?

Source: http://ift.tt/g0Io3r

A Box of Chocolates: Preview of the 2017 Telluride Film Festival

Thumb downsizing tff 2017

The Telluride Film Festival is like an especially delicious box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get —passes sell out year after year, many months before the program is announced, or even put together by the Telluride team—but when that box is opened up, on the Thursday before Labor Day, everything looks tempting and exciting. One wants to gobble it all up.

There’s a cottage industry that’s sprung up in prognosticating what you might see. Telluride watchers who hoped to see the new film "Downsizing," starring Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig, from festival favorite Alexander Payne, will not be disappointed. Payne, who showed "The Descendants" in Telluride in 2011, was also an especially adept Guest Director in 2009, re-introducing "Make Way for Tomorrow" to happy throngs, which eventually made its way onto the Criterion list. Payne and the print will arrive flushed with success from opening the Venice Film Festival and receiving excellent reviews. 

Paul Schrader introduced "Affliction" in Telluride in 1997, and "Auto Focus" in 2002, when he also received Telluride’s highest tribute, the Silver Medallion. He returns with the premiere of "First Reformed," starring Ethan Hawke and Amanda Seyfried, a spiritual story that sounds like it could be influenced by the directors of his book Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer. 

Errol Morris, whose "Tabloid" showed in 2010, and "The B-Side" only last year, returns with "Wormwood," a mysterious six-part Netflix series about a true crime, part documentary, part drama, starring Bob Balaban and Christian Camargo.

Todd Haynes, another Festival returnee, last screened "Carol" there in 2015, and returns with "Wonderstruck," starring Julianne Moore in their fourth collaboration, shown at Cannes in May. "Wonderstruck’"s gifted cinematographer Ed Lachman will receive a Silver Medallion.

Agnes Varda, director of "Visages Villages (Faces Places)," which many considered the best film at this year’s Cannes festival, where it played out of competition, received the Silver medallion from Telluride in 1977 (the fourth year of the Festival). She will alas not be in attendance this year, but her co-director, the artist JR, will accompany the film.

Other films from Cannes making their US debut at Telluride include the Russian "Loveless," directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev, about an unhappy couple searching for their son, and winner of Cannes’ Jury Prize; "A Man of Integrity," by Mohammad Rasoulof, set in corrupt Iranian society, which won the Grand Prize of the Un Certain Regard section; "The Rider," by Chloe Zhao, about a badly injured young South Dakotan rodeo rider, which won the top prize, the Art Cinema Award, of the Director’s Fortnight; "Tesnota (Closeness)," about a Jewish family forced to try to ransom their son and his new bride, also in Un Certain Regard, by Kantemir Balagov; and Barbet Schroeder’s documentary about a Buddhist monk, "Le venerable W."

The prolific Ken Burns, a Telluride resident, returns with episodes from his and Lynn Novick’s ten-part, 18-hour new documentary "The Vietnam War."

Several films directed by actresses will debut at TFF: Angelina Jolie’s Cambodian epic "First They Killed My Father"; "Lady Bird," written and directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Saoirse Ronan; and a documentary by Rebecca Miller about her famed playwright father entitled "Arthur Miller: Writer."

Christian Bale will receive a Silver Medallion and screen "Hostiles," a western set in 1892, directed by Scott Cooper (whose "Crazy Heart" played Telluride in 2009). The shape-shifting Bale plays an Army captain escorting a Cheyenne chief through dangerous territory, co-starring Rosamund Pike and Ben Foster.

Another period piece is Joe Wright’s "Darkest Hour," with Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill at the beginning of his time as Prime Minister—interesting to see right now in light of John Lithgow’s recent Golden-Globe-nominated and Emmy-winning star turn as a much older (and taller!) Churchill in The Crown. Oldman is also being talked about as an awards contender (if you like Oscar talk, that is.)

As is Annette Bening, currently serving as the jury president in Venice. She will arrive in Telluride with her incarnation as aging movie star Gloria Grahame and her young English lover (played by Jamie Bell), in "Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool," directed by Paul McGuigan, and co-starring some of the cream of English actresses, including Vanessa Redgrave, Julie Walters, and Frances Barber.

One of the glories of Telluride has always been its all-embracing inclusion of cinema’s past as well as its present and future. Guest director Joshua Oppenheimer, whose wrenching "The Act of Killing" debuted at TFF in 2012, has put together an eclectic program that includes Werner Herzog’s 1970 "Even Dwarfs Started Small" (with Herzog in attendance), Jon Bang Carlsen’s intriguing and obscure "Hotel of the Stars" (1981), an hour-long Danish documentary about extras who live in a shabby apartment hotel in Hollywood; the only movie directed by Charles Laughton, 1955’s exquisitely-shot "The Night of the Hunter," starring a brilliant, terrifying Robert Mitchum, and fortuitously playing in his centenary year; "Salam Cinema," Mohsen Makmalbaf’s 1995 record of auditions by aspiring actors; a new print of Frederick Wiseman’s long-banned, corrosive "Titicut Follies" (1967), filmed in a notorious Massachusetts hospital for the criminally insane; and Jacques Demy’s glorious, gorgeous musical, "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" (1967), starring the glorious, gorgeous Catherine Deneuve.

Other revivals, all newly restored, include Marcel Pagnol’s "The Baker’s Wife" (1938), starring the protean French actor Raimu, introduced by Pagnol’s grandson Nicolas Pagnol and Chez Panisse’s Alice Waters; the 1924 French silent "Kean, or Disorder and Genius," starring Ivan Mosjoukine and accompanied by Colorado’s own Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra; and "Such is Life," a Czech silent film from 1929. Hotly anticipated is "The Cotton Club: Encore," which Francis Ford Coppola has reworked and re-edited from his 1984 release, adding twenty minutes of, as they say, “never-before-seen!” footage. 

Every box of chocolates has a few surprises, and we didn’t see "Battle of the Sexes" coming: it’s about the goofy, over-the-top 1973 tennis game between Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) and Billie Jean King (Emma Stone). But what do we know? After all, directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris charmed us with Little Miss Sunshine. And are things any better today, when John McEnroe feels the need to announce that Venus Williams would be “like 700 in the world” if she played on the men’s tour?

Another surprise: the animated "Loving Vincent," about Vincent Van Gogh, advertised as “the first fully painted feature film,” and when I think, hmmm, Walt Disney might take exception to that, I see “first OIL painted film.” It looks rather dazzling, and unlike anything we’ve seen before.

It begins to feel like Old Home Week in Telluride: when I look up Andrew Haigh’s "Lean on Pete," I remember that its star, Travis Fimmel, appeared in "Maggie’s Plan," directed by Rebecca Miller (here with "Arthur Miller: Writer"), which co-starred Ethan Hawke (who’s in "First Reformed") and Greta Gerwig, who directs, in "Lady Bird," Saiorse Ronan, who is one of the voice actors in Loving Vincent. I have to stop; this way lies madness. 

But wait, there’s more! At least a dozen more features. And seven or eight documentaries that play in the Backlot, TFF’s smallest venue, devoted to movies about movies and biographies of artists, including one I feel somewhat responsible for, Volker Schlondorff’s 1977 "Portrait of Valeska Gert," the Weimar era dancer and cabaret star, which I saw in Bologna at Il Cinema Ritrovato in 2016 and raved about. Volker was TFF’s Guest Director later that year, but a new print wasn’t ready until this year. AND there are three shorts programs, where the gifted filmmakers of tomorrow might be discovered. AND there are panels, and book signings and poster signings. AND every year there are one or two unannounced delights, in addition to the program. An announced delight is a special outdoor screening of "An Inconvenient Sequel."

And a final surprise: Guillermo del Toro’s mad Cold War fairy tale "The Shape of Water," (starring Sally Hawkins and a lovely blue creature), whose rather dazzling trailer I saw night before last, and I wish I hadn’t. I’d like to come to it, as many who make the pilgrimage to Telluride do, in an untouched and virginal state. We enter the churches of cinema, the Palm, the Galaxy, the Herzog, the Chuck Jones, and we say “Astonish me!” Not every film we see there will, but the cumulative effect is miraculous indeed.

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The Waterphone: An Unorthodox Musical Instrument

Movie directors (and whales) just love the Waterphone. It’s an eerie, surreal-sounding instrument unlike any other, and it looks pretty unusual too. Musician and craftsman Richard Waters invented the instrument in the late 1960s, and after he passed away in 2013, his friend Brooks Hubbard, a welder and fellow musician, took over the manufacturing operation to keep the Waterphone’s legacy alive and well.

The Waterphone - Richard Waters

So what exactly is this mysterious musical creature? Waters described his invention like this: “Waterphones are stainless-steel and bronze monolithic, one-of-a-kind, acoustic, tonal-friction instruments that utilize water in the interior of their resonators to bend tones and create water echoes.”

The Waterphone - Richard Waters

Hmmm. Well, that’s certainly a technical definition. It might make a bit more sense if you actually listen to Waters and others playing the instrument. If the haunting wailing sounds familiar, that might be because you’ve heard it in a number of movies and TV shows, including Poltergeist, the Star Trek movie, Young Guns, the remake of The Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Matrix, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Let The Right One In, 24, and The Mentalist. The sound creates an instant atmosphere, so we can see why it’s such a hit among directors.

If you’re a serious musician, you’ll probably want to learn about the Waterphone’s tuning specs. Waters explained the principles on his website: “The tonal rods are tuned to a combination of micro-tonal and diatonic relationships presented in two distinct but integrated scales having both even and uneven increments.” Of course, it wasn’t all technical music theory for Waters. He also said, “My Waterphones are hand-crafted, durable, sonic sculptures that are fun and easy to play.”

The Waterphone - Richard Waters

So just how do you play it? You can start by either holding the Waterphone by its neck or suspending it from a cord. After that, all bets are off — use a bow to play it in the manner of a stringed instrument, or play it like a percussion instrument using mallets and your hand or just your fingers.

You will be happy to know that the Waterphone has some siblings, too. The Trongos (whose name sounds like an alien race in Star Wars) consist of three connected water drums, all of which are made out of stainless steel and bronze. There are holes in the drums for adding or subtracting water to tune them.

Trongos - Richard Waters

Waters described the playing of Trongos this way on his website: “The central larger drum is held between the legs so that the water may be activated by moving the legs as the Trongos are played. This motion creates schiziosonic modulations and pre-echoes due to the different speeds of sound in air/metal/water.” The drum heads may be on top, but the Trongos’ bottom sides can also be played, giving you six drums in total and adding to the versatility of the instrument.

You can also buy wind chimes, wind flutes, and percussion instruments like bamboo slit drums and rattles on the Waterphone website. Bird calls, Aeolian wind harps, bows, and mallets are also available there.

The Waterphone - Richard Waters

Love quirky musical instruments? Check out Bart Hopkin’s creations, too!

Source: http://dornob.com