Stepping Down from Savage Minds

I’m sad to announce that I am leaving Savage Minds.

Long-time readers have noticed that I have posted less and less frequently over the years, with my last post being over two years ago now. Part of this is just that I’m busy — I’m the executive director of a fast-growing museum with too little staff and too little resources (your basic museum, that is…) and it leaves little time for “extracurricular” activities.

But more than that, as we’ve been discussing changing the name of the site, we’ve naturally also been discussing the future direction of the site, and it’s become more and more clear that I don’t really have much to contribute. When we started Savage Minds, our goal was to apply anthropological understandings to the world around us in a way that was accessible to the general lay reader. Over the years, as my colleagues have gone from grad students to junior faculty to tenured professors, and as we’ve added new members and visiting writers from across the field, the focus of the site has naturally changed. Today’s Savage Minds (and tomorrow’s Anthrodendum) functions far more as a watercooler for anthropologists, with discussions of AAA resolutions and internal review boards and publishing standards.

And that’s fine. The anthropology community obviously needs that kind of place, judging by the reception and accolades Savage Minds has received within the field. At its best, Savage Minds provides a forum for multi-vocal discussions of issues that deeply affect the discipline and our ability to do the work it demands.

That’s just not the kind of work I can play much of a role in. While I still teach an intro to anthro class every semester at the local community college, I simply cannot keep up with the literature in the field. Running a museum means keeping up with a whole different literature, dealing with security, facilities maintenance, retail practices, product development, staff training, legal compliance, financial record-keeping, conservation, cataloguing, text label design, and so on. Only a small percentage of my job, the part dealing with the actual content of our collection and the social contexts which produced it, draws on my anthropological training — and generally my work there deals with interpreting the history we represent for a general lay audience, not other academics and professionals.

So with a name change on the horizon, and all that it represents, now seems like a good time to make my exit. I’m proud to have been a founding member of Savage Minds and I’m proud of the contributions I’ve made to the site, and I’m proud of my fellow Minds for the work they’ve done to make Savage Minds an indispensable anthropological resource. When we set out to create this site, we felt that “blogging”, then a new phenomenon in the world, had an important role to play for anthropology, and I think the last 11 years have proven that feeling correct over and over.

Thank you to all the readers and to my fellow Minds for letting me be a part of Savage Minds. I look forward to watching the site continue to grow and evolve with the field. And if you’re ever in Las Vegas, be sure to drop by the Burlesque Hall of Fame (soon to be in it’s new home at 1027 South Main Street!) and say “hi”.

Source: https://savageminds.org

Stepping Down from Savage Minds

I’m sad to announce that I am leaving Savage Minds.

Long-time readers have noticed that I have posted less and less frequently over the years, with my last post being over two years ago now. Part of this is just that I’m busy — I’m the executive director of a fast-growing museum with too little staff and too little resources (your basic museum, that is…) and it leaves little time for “extracurricular” activities.

But more than that, as we’ve been discussing changing the name of the site, we’ve naturally also been discussing the future direction of the site, and it’s become more and more clear that I don’t really have much to contribute. When we started Savage Minds, our goal was to apply anthropological understandings to the world around us in a way that was accessible to the general lay reader. Over the years, as my colleagues have gone from grad students to junior faculty to tenured professors, and as we’ve added new members and visiting writers from across the field, the focus of the site has naturally changed. Today’s Savage Minds (and tomorrow’s Anthrodendum) functions far more as a watercooler for anthropologists, with discussions of AAA resolutions and internal review boards and publishing standards.

And that’s fine. The anthropology community obviously needs that kind of place, judging by the reception and accolades Savage Minds has received within the field. At its best, Savage Minds provides a forum for multi-vocal discussions of issues that deeply affect the discipline and our ability to do the work it demands.

That’s just not the kind of work I can play much of a role in. While I still teach an intro to anthro class every semester at the local community college, I simply cannot keep up with the literature in the field. Running a museum means keeping up with a whole different literature, dealing with security, facilities maintenance, retail practices, product development, staff training, legal compliance, financial record-keeping, conservation, cataloguing, text label design, and so on. Only a small percentage of my job, the part dealing with the actual content of our collection and the social contexts which produced it, draws on my anthropological training — and generally my work there deals with interpreting the history we represent for a general lay audience, not other academics and professionals.

So with a name change on the horizon, and all that it represents, now seems like a good time to make my exit. I’m proud to have been a founding member of Savage Minds and I’m proud of the contributions I’ve made to the site, and I’m proud of my fellow Minds for the work they’ve done to make Savage Minds an indispensable anthropological resource. When we set out to create this site, we felt that “blogging”, then a new phenomenon in the world, had an important role to play for anthropology, and I think the last 11 years have proven that feeling correct over and over.

Thank you to all the readers and to my fellow Minds for letting me be a part of Savage Minds. I look forward to watching the site continue to grow and evolve with the field. And if you’re ever in Las Vegas, be sure to drop by the Burlesque Hall of Fame (soon to be in it’s new home at 1027 South Main Street!) and say “hi”.

Source: https://savageminds.org

Hansgrohe: Efficient, Stylish, Pampering Shower Heads

What better place to unveil a new water-saving technology than in California, a state that’s constantly had to conserve water through restrictions on use and the creation of water recycling plants? At this year’s Dwell on Design convention in downtown Los Angeles, Hansgrohe did exactly that, debuting their luxurious new Axor Montreux collection and inviting attendees to try some of their products out. At their interactive “fountain” display booth, the company gave Dornob a hands-on introduction to its newest faucet and shower head fixtures.

Hansgrohe Display Hansgrohe - Overhead Shower Head

If one thing’s for sure, it’s that Hansgrohe knows how to make some quality shower heads. The company has been working in bathroom fittings for over 116 years, and that experience is reflected in their products. Ryan Ramaker, Hansgrohe’s Director of Product Development, says, “Hansgrohe has a rich history of innovation and a long-time commitment to sustainability. Our vast offering meets the strictest water conservation legislation in the nation, such as the CEC legislation in California and Colorado.” Ramaker stresses that while efficiency is one of the company’s key considerations when it comes to product design, it is not its only consideration. He explains, “More than just flow restrictors, our products are well-engineered, powerful solutions that deliver a voluminous, luxurious shower.”

Hansgrohe - Wall-Mounted Shower Head

Part of the quality engineering he’s referring to is the company’s “EcoRight” technology. EcoRight taps and showers use up to 60 percent less water than standard plumbing fixtures, meaning big savings on your utility bills!

Hansgrohe - Overhead Shower Head

All of the company’s low-flow, high-efficiency shower heads have been equipped with powerful jets for an ultra-relaxing shower experience. Each one of Hansgrohe’s new “Raindance Select” hand showers provides a different effect: “Rain AIR” gives you the feeling of being caught in a relaxing rain shower, and its sibling,”Rain,” produces a much stronger, storm-like spray. The “Chroma Select” blows those models out of the water with its “Intense Rain” mode, which the company describes as an “intensive spray to wash away all the stress from the head and shoulders” — the perfect remedy for a tough day at work. Looking for a softer spray? The fixtures’ built-in “Select” system makes switching between settings as easy as pushing a button. One setting that really intrigued us was “Whirl.” Hansgrohe is billing it as a “gushing massage” whose “rotating helix spray wanders over the skin, just like a masseur’s fingers.”

Hansgrohe - Handheld Shower Head

Of course, Hansgrohe has done much more than build a variety of spray modes into its fixtures. It’s also designed a few different mounting styles for customers to choose from. In addition to a traditional wall-mount, the company is currently offering wall bar, handheld nozzle, and overhead options. The best part is, all of these Axor fittings boast a durable finish that makes them highly resistant to water spots and scratches.

Hansgrohe - Overhead Shower Head

While it’s clear that Hansgrohe wants to combine beauty and efficiency in our homes, its water preservation efforts should not be forgotten. Hansgrohe has been one of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense partners for ten years now, and it sponsors projects that promote sustainable water management policies in India, Haiti, and other developing countries around the world.

Source: http://dornob.com

Trailer for Indie Comedy ‘Sundowners’ About Wedding Videographers

Sundowners Trailer

"I’ve been drifting for so long, I don’t even remember where I want to go…" This might hit a little close to home for any up-and-coming filmmakers out there who have done this kind of work and felt this way. Sundowners is an indie comedy about two struggling videographers who decide to take a job filming a wedding down in Mexico. But, of course, they run into all kinds of problems after they discover their boss is playing fast and loose. The main cast includes Phil Hanley, Luke Lalonde, Tim Heidecker, Cara Gee, Nick Flanagan, Chris Locke, James Hartnett, and Leah Fay Goldstein. This looks amusing, and a bit depressing, but maybe it’s surprisingly quite good. There’s some impressive match cuts and sleek editing in this trailer. Perhaps it’s some kind of indie gem just waiting to be discovered. Who knows? Take a look.

Here’s the first official trailer (+ poster) for Pavan Moondi’s Sundowners, direct from YouTube:

Sundowners Poster

It’s not the destination wedding that matters, but the journey the hapless videographers have trying to capture it. Sundowners tells the story of a struggling filmmaker who goes to Mexico to shoot a destination wedding, scamming his boss into thinking his best friend is a photographer in the process. Sundowners is both written and directed by Canadian filmmaker Pavan Moondi, of the films Everyday Is Like Sunday and Diamond Tongues previously, as well as a few short films and episodes of "Four in the Morning". This first premiered at the Nashville Film Festival earlier this spring, and also played at the Buenos Aires Festival of Independent Cinema. The film is set to play a few more festivals and open this fall in Canada, but still doesn’t have an official US release date. For more info, follow @sundownersmovie. Anyone interested?

Source: http://ift.tt/g0Io3r