Viral Dancing Gorilla Video Gets the Most Perfect Soundtrack Ever

 

In true Internet fashion, a viral video of a dancing gorilla in a pool was recently uploaded by the Dallas Zoo. Video producer Bob Hagh then decided the video needed some music and chose wisely with “Maniac” by Michael Sembello and popularized by the 1983 movie, Flashdance.

Fellow twitter user Kristina Lucare retweeted Bob Hagh’s glorious edit and now the remixed version has been viewed more than the original and the Kristina’s retweet has been shared over 200,000 times on Twitter.

 

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Chvrches’ Lauren Mayberry Joins Paramore for “Misery Business”: Watch

Paramore performed in Edinburgh, Scotland over the weekend, where they were joined by Chvrches frontwoman Lauren Mayberry and a fan from the crowd to perform their song “Misery Business,” off the 2007 album Riot! Watch it go down below. This isn’t the first time Hayley Williams and Mayberry have shared the stage—Williams previously hopped on Chvrches’ remix of the song “Bury It,” off the band’s most recent album Every Open Eye, and joined the band to perform it as well. Chvrches also performed during the most recent edition of Paramore’s cruise ship festival.

VIDEO

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Designing Duo


So many apartments in Paris have white walls but not this one. It is painted in seven shades of grey graduating from light to dark as you move back to the private spaces. I came across the home of David Chaplain and Alexandre Roussard on The Socialite Family, an interesting website that features “smart and cool families.” At first, I was a little concerned that it discriminated against single people but they are profiled under the Portraits section. Seems David Chaplain works for Chanel and Alexandre Roussard is the head of architecture and merchandising for Diptyque. Their Paris apartment is a joint design project influenced by the furniture of Jean Royère, the interiors of Gio Ponti and Jean Michel Frank, and more recently, the universe of Dimore Studio. The dark interiors are punctuated with brass accents and things they have collected. I especially love the clean contemporary black kitchen that is insanely chic and would definitely not convey the same elegance in white. 

Source: http://ift.tt/1mSXkxt

Chvrches’ Lauren Mayberry Joins Paramore for “Misery Business”: Watch

Paramore performed in Edinburgh, Scotland over the weekend, where they were joined by Chvrches frontwoman Lauren Mayberry and a fan from the crowd to perform their song “Misery Business,” off the 2007 album Riot! Watch it go down below. This isn’t the first time Hayley Williams and Mayberry have shared the stage—Williams previously hopped on Chvrches’ remix of the song “Bury It,” off the band’s most recent album Every Open Eye, and joined the band to perform it as well. Chvrches also performed during the most recent edition of Paramore’s cruise ship festival.

VIDEO

Source: http://ift.tt/2sSr762

Designing Duo


So many apartments in Paris have white walls but not this one. It is painted in seven shades of grey graduating from light to dark as you move back to the private spaces. I came across the home of David Chaplain and Alexandre Roussard on The Socialite Family, an interesting website that features “smart and cool families.” At first, I was a little concerned that it discriminated against single people but they are profiled under the Portraits section. Seems David Chaplain works for Chanel and Alexandre Roussard is the head of architecture and merchandising for Diptyque. Their Paris apartment is a joint design project influenced by the furniture of Jean Royère, the interiors of Gio Ponti and Jean Michel Frank, and more recently, the universe of Dimore Studio. The dark interiors are punctuated with brass accents and things they have collected. I especially love the clean contemporary black kitchen that is insanely chic and would definitely not convey the same elegance in white. 

Source: http://ift.tt/1mSXkxt

Charles Darwin & Charles Dickens’ Four-Hour Work Day: The Case for Why Less Work Can Mean More Productivity

We all operate at different levels of ambition: some just want to get by and enjoy themselves, while others strive to make achievements with as long-lasting an impact on humanity as possible. If we think of candidates for the latter category, Charles Darwin may well come to mind, at least in the sense that the work he did as a naturalist, and more so the theory of evolution that came out of it, has ensured that we remember his name well over a century after his death and will surely continue to do so centuries hence. But research into Darwin’s working life suggests something less than workaholism — and indeed, that he put in a fraction of the number of hours we associate with serious ambition.

"After his morning walk and breakfast, Darwin was in his study by 8 and worked a steady hour and a half," writes Nautilus‘ Alex Soojung-kim Pang. "At 9:30 he would read the morning mail and write letters. At 10:30, Darwin returned to more serious work, sometimes moving to his aviary, greenhouse, or one of several other buildings where he conducted his experiments. By noon, he would declare, ‘I’ve done a good day’s work,’ and set out on a long walk." After this walk he would answer letters, take a nap, take another walk, go back to his study, and then have dinner with the family. Darwin typically got to bed, according to a daily schedule drawn from his son Francis’ reminiscences of his father, by 10:30.

"On this schedule he wrote 19 books, including technical volumes on climbing plants, barnacles, and other subjects," writes Pang, and of course not failing to mention "The Origin of Species, probably the single most famous book in the history of science, and a book that still affects the way we think about nature and ourselves." Another textually prolific Victorian Englishman named Charles, adhering to a similarly non-life-consuming work routine, managed to produce — in addition to tireless letter-writing and campaigning for social reform — hundreds of short stories and articles, five novellas, and fifteen novels including Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, and Great Expectations

"After an early life burning the midnight oil," writes Pang, Charles Dickens "settled into a schedule as ‘methodical or orderly’ as a ‘city clerk,’ his son Charley said. Dickens shut himself in his study from 9 until 2, with a break for lunch. Most of his novels were serialized in magazines, and Dickens was rarely more than a chapter or two ahead of the illustrators and printer. Nonetheless, after five hours, Dickens was done for the day." Pang finds that may other successful writers have kept similarly restrained work schedules, from Anthony Trollope to Alice Munro, Somerset Maugham to Gabriel García Márquez, Saul Bellow to Stephen King. He notes similar habits in science and mathematics as well, including Henri Poincaré and G.H. Hardy.

Research by Pang and others into work habits and productivity have recently drawn a great deal of attention, pointing as it does to the question of whether we might all consider working less in order to work better. "Even if you enjoy your job and work long hours voluntarily, you’re simply more likely to make mistakes when you’re tired," writes the Harvard Business Review‘s Sarah Green Carmichael. What’s more, "work too hard and you also lose sight of the bigger picture. Research has suggested that as we burn out, we have a greater tendency to get lost in the weeds." This discovery actually dates back to Darwin and Dickens’ 19th century: "When organized labor first compelled factory owners to limit workdays to 10 (and then eight) hours, management was surprised to discover that output actually increased – and that expensive mistakes and accidents decreased."

This goes just as much for academics, whose workweeks, "as long as they are, are not nearly as lengthy as those on Wall Street (yet)," writes Times Higher Education‘s David Matthews in a piece on the research of University of Pennsylvania professor (and ex-Goldman Sachs banker) Alexandra Michel. "Four hours a day is probably the limit for those looking to do genuinely original research, she says. In her experience, the only people who have avoided burnout and achieved some sort of balance in their lives are those sticking to this kind of schedule." Michel finds that "because academics do not have their hours strictly defined and regulated (as manual workers do), ‘other controls take over. These controls are peer pressure.’" So at least we know the first step on the journey toward viable work habits: regarding the likes of Darwin and Dickens as your peers.

via Nautilus

Related Content:

The Daily Habits of Highly Productive Philosophers: Nietzsche, Marx & Immanuel Kant

The Daily Habits of Famous Writers: Franz Kafka, Haruki Murakami, Stephen King & More

John Updike’s Advice to Young Writers: ‘Reserve an Hour a Day’

Thomas Edison’s Hugely Ambitious “To-Do” List from 1888

Leonardo Da Vinci’s To Do List (Circa 1490) Is Much Cooler Than Yours

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. He’s at work on the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles, the video series The City in Cinema, the crowdfunded journalism project Where Is the City of the Future?, and the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

Charles Darwin & Charles Dickens’ Four-Hour Work Day: The Case for Why Less Work Can Mean More Productivity is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don’t miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

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Designing Duo


So many apartments in Paris have white walls but not this one. It is painted in seven shades of grey graduating from light to dark as you move back to the private spaces. I came across the home of David Chaplain and Alexandre Roussard on The Socialite Family, an interesting website that features “smart and cool families.” At first, I was a little concerned that it discriminated against single people but they are profiled under the Portraits section. Seems David Chaplain works for Chanel and Alexandre Roussard is the head of architecture and merchandising for Diptyque. Their Paris apartment is a joint design project influenced by the furniture of Jean Royère, the interiors of Gio Ponti and Jean Michel Frank, and more recently, the universe of Dimore Studio. The dark interiors are punctuated with brass accents and things they have collected. I especially love the clean contemporary black kitchen that is insanely chic and would definitely not convey the same elegance in white. 

Source: http://ift.tt/1mSXkxt

Chvrches’ Lauren Mayberry Joins Paramore for “Misery Business”: Watch

Paramore performed in Edinburgh, Scotland over the weekend, where they were joined by Chvrches frontwoman Lauren Mayberry and a fan from the crowd to perform their song “Misery Business,” off the 2007 album Riot! Watch it go down below. This isn’t the first time Hayley Williams and Mayberry have shared the stage—Williams previously hopped on Chvrches’ remix of the song “Bury It,” off the band’s most recent album Every Open Eye, and joined the band to perform it as well. Chvrches also performed during the most recent edition of Paramore’s cruise ship festival.

VIDEO

Source: http://ift.tt/2sSr762

Bank Employee Foils Robbers by Casually Locking the Front Door

 

Three would-be bank robbers in Guadalajara, Mexico were recently foiled by a quick-thinking employee who casually locked the front door before the three men could enter the bank.

The incident was recorded on a security camera and the footage was recently released by a local news organization.

 

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