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If this looks familiar it’s because yesterday I uploaded it with a typo, in which the dad was offering to taste the kid’s sore throat. That may literally be the creepiest typo in the history of typoes.

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Coastal Vibes from Mollusk

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

I am a west coast type of person. After living on the east coast and being born along the west coast of Michigan, I know that I am a sunsets soul and not a sunrise. I find it interesting how we can have those parts of ourselves. Maybe this is why I have always resonated and loved the dreamy light of the California coast. So when Mollusk Surf Shop recently shared their dreamy look book images for fall, I just had to share them with you.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange. Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

We joke here in Traverse City about being the Third Coast and if you have ever been here you would understand. The light is similar in the evenings in the summer and fall to the light that you experience on the coast of California. The weather is less temperate, but I think that is why I love the culture of California even though I have ever traveled their a few times.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

If you haven’t heard of Mollusk Surf Shop you need to take a moment and check them out. Mike and I love their clothing and live in a lot of it throughout the year. Their pieces easily transition from season to season and layer well.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

This year they have some really awesome sweaters and cozy pieces you won’t want to miss checking out. Many of their pieces are produced in the US and I am here to tell you they wear incredibly well considering they put up with our life of adventure and parenting.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Though living in California, fall clothing looks a little different than it does here in Michigan, I still love their pieces. Many of their sweatshirts are things I wear every day to work in and hike in any time of year. Because they use fabrics that breathe but also stand up to the winds of living on the west coast, they are so transitional.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Mike and I also sweat by any of their t-shirts. They are our favorite tees to wear every day. The fit is great and the hemp fabrics are more sustainable than cotton is for the environment.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

I hope these fall coastal vibes from Mollusk get you excited for some adventurous fall days on the shoreline. Happy Thursday, friends!

See all their new arrivals in their shop and be inspired by their Instagram.

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Coastal Vibes from Mollusk

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

I am a west coast type of person. After living on the east coast and being born along the west coast of Michigan, I know that I am a sunsets soul and not a sunrise. I find it interesting how we can have those parts of ourselves. Maybe this is why I have always resonated and loved the dreamy light of the California coast. So when Mollusk Surf Shop recently shared their dreamy look book images for fall, I just had to share them with you.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange. Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

We joke here in Traverse City about being the Third Coast and if you have ever been here you would understand. The light is similar in the evenings in the summer and fall to the light that you experience on the coast of California. The weather is less temperate, but I think that is why I love the culture of California even though I have ever traveled their a few times.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

If you haven’t heard of Mollusk Surf Shop you need to take a moment and check them out. Mike and I love their clothing and live in a lot of it throughout the year. Their pieces easily transition from season to season and layer well.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

This year they have some really awesome sweaters and cozy pieces you won’t want to miss checking out. Many of their pieces are produced in the US and I am here to tell you they wear incredibly well considering they put up with our life of adventure and parenting.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Though living in California, fall clothing looks a little different than it does here in Michigan, I still love their pieces. Many of their sweatshirts are things I wear every day to work in and hike in any time of year. Because they use fabrics that breathe but also stand up to the winds of living on the west coast, they are so transitional.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Mike and I also sweat by any of their t-shirts. They are our favorite tees to wear every day. The fit is great and the hemp fabrics are more sustainable than cotton is for the environment.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

Costal Vibe for fall from Mollusk Surf Shop on The Fresh Exchange.

I hope these fall coastal vibes from Mollusk get you excited for some adventurous fall days on the shoreline. Happy Thursday, friends!

See all their new arrivals in their shop and be inspired by their Instagram.

Source: http://ift.tt/1t9CPFe

A Distinctive Pattern: The Legendary Costume Designer Sandy Powell on “Wonderstruck”

A Distinctive Pattern: The Legendary Costume Designer Sandy Powell on “Wonderstruck”

October 19, 2017
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Lovely, nostalgic and wondrous, Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” casts a magical spell through a melancholic tale that intersects two parallel stories set in two separate eras. Adapted by Brian Selznick from his own illustrated book (the author, whose The Invention of Hugo Cabret was the source material for Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo”), “Wonderstruck” impressively brings two chapters of New York City’s history to life in following the analogous (and ultimately interconnecting) journeys of two non-hearing children. In one, which receives a dreamy and gorgeous silent movie treatment, we follow Rose (the astonishing newcomer Millicent Simmonds, a real-life non-hearing actor) in the 1920s as she embarks on a quest to find her actress mother Lillian Mayhew (Julianne Moore). In the other, Ben (Oakes Fegley) and Jamie (Jaden Michael) lead us into the gritty streets of the city in the 1970s with an adventure and familial mission of their own.

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From Carter Burwell’s exquisite score to Ed Lachman’s stunning photography, this overwhelmingly ambitious project—perhaps the biggest film of Haynes’ career from a sheer scale and scope perspective—is a craftsmanship spectacle of the highest order. Unsurprisingly, its costumes—designed by the inimitable and legendary Sandy Powell—play one of the most crucial parts in visually telling the two interrelated tales while presenting two polar-opposite eras of The Big Apple through sublime details of foreground and (especially) background costumes. Recently joining me on the phone, the 12-time Academy Award-nominated and three-time winning costume designer (with previous wins for “Shakespeare in Love,” “The Aviator” and “The Young Victoria,” while “Wonderstruck” may very well be her fourth Oscar) shared her approach to this monster of a project which she rightly sees as dressing two separate films and the unique challenges of costuming for black & white.

You’re an Executive Producer on “Wonderstruck” in addition to being the Costume Designer. Todd Haynes often mentions you first brought Brian Selznick’s book to his attention. 

I met Brian during the making of “Hugo,” which is the Martin Scorsese film I designed the costumes for. It was [also] based on Brian’s book, although he didn’t write the screenplay. But we met and became friends. And then I actually didn’t read “Wonderstruck,” which was the book following “Hugo,” until I visited him in his San Diego home in La Jolla. I just one day picked it off the shelf and read it in one sitting, and said, “Brian, this would make a great film!”

I think what I thought would make a great film is (as usual with Brian’s books): his books are 50% illustration. He tells the story wordlessly with illustrations. It’s either sort of mixed in with narrative, like in “Hugo,” or half of it is dialogue and half of it is pictures, which is how [“Wonderstruck”] is. It began with a very visual experience of reading a story. And I just thought visually it would be really interesting. And the fact it actually covered the two periods, I thought, would be a really interesting concept for a film, especially for kids.

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How did you approach this giant task of covering two completely different periods from a costume design standpoint? Not only they are two different periods, but also they are sort of polar-opposite periods. The mood in the ‘20s is nothing like the ‘70s.

Exactly.

Was it like costume designing two separate films?

It was. I think that is exactly what it was like. It’s like doing two separate projects rolled into one. I mean, you have to think differently for each one. Although the design process is the same. How you go about creating the costumes and creating the looks is thought of in the same way. But you did have to divide yourself and your team almost into two different groups. One dealing with 1920s or certain days of the week dealing with 1920s, and certain days of the week dealing with 1970s. Obviously there were occasions when you had to try and do both in the same day and get your head from the ‘20s into the ‘70s and then back again. That was exactly what it was like. And interestingly enough I’m working on a film right now [Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman”] in New York City, which covers three different periods.

Oh, wow.

And that’s even more work. Our biggest crowd scene is like 300 people, and you would only ever have those 300 people to dress and move around different scenes. But because there are two different periods, you’ve got 300 people in the ‘70s and then 300 people in the ‘20s. So, it’s actually twice as much work in the same amount of time and for the same amount of money you would normally get to do a film with one period. So that was challenging.

And then there is also a third and fourth dimension in “Wonderstruck” in addition to the two time periods, when you think about dressing Lillian Mayhew (Julianne Moore) while she is acting on stage and screen. Plus, there is also the flashback scene with the puppets.

That’s true. We actually cover real life in the 1920s and in the 1970s. And then theatrical costumes for both the stage costume and also for when she’s in the silent movie. And then there is the animated section at the end. It didn’t involve costume but I was involved with working with the model makers on suggesting what the little models of the characters wore. There are many elements.

This is the first time you’ve done something in black and white. When you strip off color, you’re kind of removing a whole visual layer from your designs. So I’m wondering if the ‘20s segment was a unique challenge for you in that regard. 

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It was and it’s interesting. You’re absolutely right, it was taking away something. And, [color is] usually the element I begin with. It was sort of like going back and starting again and learning a process without a key element there. Normally, I’ll have an idea for the color of what somebody is wearing before I know the specifics of it. I do very much think in color. For the 1920s section with no color, [it was not like] there was no color [per se], but there was various tones and monochromes. So I had to think in terms of tone and contrast as opposed to color. I would normally put something together in how it works shape wise, and also very much how colors work together. And how they work together to create a whole.

I would begin by doing what I would normally do. I would fit costumes on [Millicent Simmonds], who plays young Rose, based on how I would like to see them. And then we looked at it through a camera, with a black and white filter on it or took photographs with black and white. And quite often what looks great to the eye, looks really bland on black and white. That was when I had to learn a whole different process of putting things together that actually worked in black and white. Which very often were colors that I would never use together.

Which is quite interesting. On one hand, it made some things a lot simpler. For instance, when we were dressing big scenes of extras, I didn’t have to worry about “I haven’t got a hat that goes with that coat.” Because through a black and white lens, it works. But sometimes I found it difficult myself to actually look at things on set, and think “It looks really weird to my eye, but it’s going to be fine in camera.” It was a process of photos even when I was looking for fabrics to make costumes out of. I would photograph them first: photograph this fabric against the dress fabric against coat fabric against the skirt fabric or against the texture of the slacks. I would photograph them together before making a decision.

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Did you refer to the silent era, watching films from that period? 

Yes, definitely. I actually always look at films from a period [when I’m doing research]. And especially since this one was inspired by silent movies. But, there’s only so much you can take from that. You look at how they look and where the contrast is, and then Ed Lachman, our Director of Photography, actually said that for him, it would be much more interesting to have the most textured materials and the most extreme amounts of contrast. He said, for him that would make it more interesting. 

In the ‘70s segment, there seems to be a specific color palette. Sure, there are reds and other colors, but I felt it was more earthy tones like oranges, browns, and yellows … 

I think a lot of that was to do with how the film was treated, and what Ed was trying to achieve with the look of the film. Because [the ‘20s section] of the film looks like black and white movies. And the [‘70s section] looks like films that are actually made in the 70s where the film stock was different to how it is now. And that was the idea. It does have a very sort of yellowy, orangey feel to it. 

But, having said that, a lot of the colors in the ‘70s were [indeed] browns and oranges. Because we were using original clothing from the period, that’s what you got. You got what was fashionable at the time, which was an awful lot of browns and oranges. But, then there were purples and pinks, and there were all colors of the spectrum there. But how it was treated in the filming is how you get that overall feeling. It really does look like the films I remember seeing in the ‘70s, or when we looked at the stuff again for research that was from that era. That really was the purpose and I guess you noted that it worked.

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It really did! And the background tells the story of the city in that era. It’s around the “Drop Dead” period of New York City. But then everybody looks cool and defiant, and even rebellious in a way. There are a lot of exposed waists in the clothing you see in the streets. 

Those street scenes in the ‘70s were probably my most favorite bits of the film. Because what we tried to do with the extras in the 1920s and the 1970s was really create the world, the new world that these kids were coming into from much quieter areas. They both hit New York City. And although it’s in different decades, it’s the same effect because they are bombarded with this sort of throng of people. And for the ‘70s particularly. 1977 was a time when New York was a pretty dangerous and dirty place to live. There had been sanitation strikes and things. It was dirty and down, there was unemployment. There was a lot of mess everywhere. And the area that he walks out into on Port Authority is a very mixed area. It’s people on their way to work, on their way home from work, but a lot of unemployed people, a lot of poor people, too.

What we wanted to do was really create a huge, broad section of the society. New York is full of different characters, different races. People that he would never have seen before. Which is really fun to do, and really challenging to do when you’re fitting extras. It’s not only about putting clothes on people, [but also about] finding the right people that look like they were from the ‘70s to wear the clothes and then create the characters around them. You have somebody come in for a fitting and you look at them and say “Okay, what can we do with this person? What would this person be wearing? Where would this person be going?”

We did the same in the 1920s, but it was different because in the 1920s, Rose comes off the ferry into the Financial District. And this is at a time when it was up, when it was prosperous and thriving and doing well. The crowd there was very different. It’s people busy, on their way to work, and there was a lot more affluence. And it wasn’t such a mixture or a wide cross section.

I thought there was a clear distinction between how you dressed the New Yorker Jamie [Jaden Michael] versus the suburban Ben [Oakes Fegley] in the ’70s segment.

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You’re absolutely right. That’s a good point. The stripe-y t-shirt and the jeans on Jamie was much more urban. And the other kids was, of course, in a checked shirt [and khakis], which is much more generic. 

Michelle Williams wears a fabulous robe at home towards the start of the film. It’s a beautiful piece of garment that made me gasp both times I saw “Wonderstruck.” And for the story itself, it’s a very specific costume moment.

There is a story behind [that robe]. In the story, it doesn’t really mention that she’s wearing anything in particular. But, then when [Ben] comes across his cousin back in their own house, in his old house, and the script says he looks through the door and he sees his mother. And it turns out it’s his cousin wearing his mother’s clothes. She then quickly takes it off and runs away. And it didn’t actually say what the clothing was when it was written for the screenplay. I think it might have been a shawl, and I said, “A shawl is a bit weird.” It had to be an item of clothing that was completely distinctive that he would recognize and the audience would recognize instantly as what was seen on the mother. But, it also had to come off really quickly. And I thought, “Well what is somebody going to be wearing in the middle of summer that they can take off really quickly?”

I mean, it’s just what it actually is, a robe. It’s part of a 1930s or 20s pajama set. And in the 1970s, I remember this because I was a teenager in the 1970s, there was a real popularity with vintage clothing, Especially ‘20s and ‘30s. And as a teenager I would wander around wearing ‘30s tea-gowns in the day. So, it’s something that a young, bohemian woman would’ve picked up in a thrift store. A fabulous piece of clothing that would’ve cost her nothing in a thrift store. She put it on and it was her favorite thing. But it had a really distinctive pattern on it so that it would actually tell the story.

Ever since Cannes, I’ve been looking online for something similar. I failed.

[laughs] You have to look for art deco pajamas of 1920s and 1930s, or you won’t find it.

The other film of yours this year that I’ve seen in Cannes, “How to Talk to Girls at Parties,” I am mesmerized by the look you found for Nicole Kidman. It has this distinct ‘70s punk attitude, but also, and perhaps this is not the right word, it felt sort of futuristic to me. 

I didn’t really think of her as futuristic or connected to the aliens. Of course, with alien characters, I was thinking of what the people in the future do. Or what would aliens do when they come to earth? They try and sort of copy what people on earth are wearing. That’s what the aliens were. And for Nicole Kidman, I had come up with a punk look, considering she was a fashion designer. And she had to have her own unique look as a fashion designer. So it was really just coming up with something. Everything she wears is made from vintage things and stuff that sounds like the chains on an old tuxedo jacket. It’s sort of how clothing, how punk clothing, really started out, making use of what was around. I was just trying to think, If I was a fashion designer in the ‘70s, and trying to come up with a different look, what would it be?

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First Teaser Trailer for Festival Hit ‘I, Tonya’ Starring Margot Robbie

First Teaser Trailer for Festival Hit ‘I, Tonya’ Starring Margot Robbie

by
October 19, 2017
Source: YouTube

“America: they want someone to love, they want someone to hate.” Neon has revealed a short teaser trailer for the indie dark comedy I, Tonya, which premiered at the Toronto Film Festival to lots of rave reviews. I, Tonya, the latest from director Craig Gillespie, tells a fictionalized version of the true story of figure skater Tonya Harding, who planned an attack on her rival Nancy Kerrigan after a practice session at the 1994 U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Detroit. Margot Robbie stars as Tonya Harding, with a cast including Sebastian Stan, Allison Janney, Paul Walter Hauser, Julianne Nicholson, Bobby Cannavale, Mckenna Grace, plus Caitlin Carver as Nancy Kerrigan. Based on all the buzz from TIFF and this first look, I am crazy excited to see this film. Sounds like it’s dark and devious and enjoyable in all the right ways.

Here’s the first teaser trailer for Craig Gillespie’s I, Tonya, direct from Neon’s YouTube:

VIDEO

I, Tonya Movie

Based on unbelievable but true events, I, Tonya is the darkly comedic tale of American figure skater Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie) and one of the most sensational scandals in sports history. Though Harding was the first American woman to complete a triple axel in competition, her legacy has forever been defined by her association with an infamous, ill-conceived and worse-executed attack on fellow Olympic competitor Nancy Kerrigan (Caitlin Carver). I, Tonya is directed by talented Australian filmmaker Craig Gillespie, of the films Mr. Woodcock, Lars and the Real Girl, Fright Night, Million Dollar Arm, and The Finest Hours previously. The screenplay is written by Steven Rogers (of Hope Floats, Stepmom, Kate & Leopold, P.S. I Love You, Love the Coopers). This first premiered at the Toronto Film Festival this fall. Neon will release Gillespie’s I, Tonya in select theaters starting December 8th this year. Who’s down to see this?

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Marvel’s The Punisher Season 1 Trailer #2 (2017) | TV Trailer | Movieclips Trailers

Marvel’s The Punisher Season 1 Trailer #2 (2017): Check out the new Marvel’s The Punisher trailer starring Jon Bernthal, Jason R. Moore, and Ebon Moss-Bachrach! Be the first to watch, comment, and share trailers and movie teasers/clips dropping @MovieclipsTrailers. Watch more Trailers: ► HOT New Trailers Playlist: http://bit.ly/2hp08G1 ► What to Watch Playlist: http://bit.ly/2ieyw8G ► Indie Trailers Channel: http://bit.ly/1CWefqU After the murder of his family, Frank Castle becomes a vigilante known as "the Punisher", who aims to fight crime by any means necessary. About Movieclips Trailers: ► Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h ► Like us on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/1QyRMsE ► Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt ► We’re on SNAPCHAT: http://bit.ly/2cOzfcy The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers channel is your destination for hot new trailers the second they drop. The Fandango MOVIECLIPS Trailers team is here day and night to make sure all the hottest new movie trailers are available whenever, wherever you want them.

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This Month’s Funniest Internet Finds

Brutally Honest Job Titles – These days there are literally thousands of fancy job titles, but what do they even mean? Normally not a lot.

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Cat vs. Vacuum Cleaner – Rather crazy-eyed but beautiful orange cat named Rijka clungs tightly to the vacuum cleaner with her front paws and proceeds to lick at the suctioned air moving through the device.

What Breakfast Pastry Are You? – Of all the web quizzes I have ever seen on the internet, this is by far the dumbest and most useless.

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Ridiculous Conspiracy Theories That Trump Believes – Turns out that Donald Trump believes plenty of wacky conspiracies. Apparently it IS possible to have a bigger moron than George W. Bush…

Husky Learns How To Blow Bubbles – Huskies are definitely a breed that stand out when it comes to personality. This little guy in particular just realized he could play scuba diver in his water dish.

The Lamest Superhero Powers of All Time – “Eating Through Anything”, “Summoning Squirrels”, and “Turning Into a Ball” are my favorites.

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Ingmar Bergman’s 1950s Soap Commercials Wash Away the Existential Despair

Ingmar Bergman is usually remembered for the intensely serious nature of his films. Death, anguish, the absence of God–his themes can be pretty gloomy. So it might come as a surprise to learn that Bergman once directed a series of rather silly soap commercials.

The year was 1951. Bergman was 33 years old. The Swedish film industry, his main source of income, had just gone on strike to protest high government taxes on entertainment. With two ex-wives, five children, a new wife and a sixth child on the way, Bergman needed to find another way to make money.

A solution presented itself when he was asked to create a series of commercials for a new anti-bacterial soap called Bris ("Breeze," in English). Bergman threw himself into the project. He later recalled:

Originally, I accepted the Bris commercials in order to save the lives of my self and my families. But that was really secondary. The primary reason I wanted to make the commercials was that I was given free rein with money and I could do exactly what I wanted with the product’s message. Anyhow, I have always found it difficult to feel resentment when industry comes rushing toward culture, check in hand.

Bergman enlisted his favorite cinematographer at that time, Gunnar Fischer, and together they made nine miniature films, each a little more than one minute long, to be screened in movie theaters over the next three years. Bergman used the opportunity to experiment with visual and narrative form.

Many of the stylistic devices and motifs that would eventually figure into his masterpieces can be spotted in the commercials: mirrors, doubles, the telescoping in or out of a story-within-a-story. You don’t need to understand Swedish to recognize the mark of the master.

In the window above we feature Episode 1, "Bris Soap," which is perhaps the most basic of the commercials. They become progressively more imaginative as the series moves along:

  • Episode 2, Tennis Girl: An innocent game of tennis sets the stage for an epic battle between good (Bris soap) and evil (bacteria). Can you guess which side wins?
  • Episode 3, Gustavian: Bad hygiene in the 17th century court of King Gustav III. Plenty of foppishness, but no Bris.
  • Episode 4, Operation: "Perhaps the most intriguing of the commercials," writes Swedish film scholar Fredrik Gustafsson. "In this one Bergman is deconstructing the whole business of filmmaking, using all the tricks of his disposal to trick and treat us."
  • Episode 5, The Magic Show: Another battle between good and evil, this time in miniature.
  • Episode 6, The Inventor: A man heroically invents anti-bacterial soap, only to awaken and realize it was all a dream. (And anyway, the makers of Bris had already done it.)
  • Episode 7, The Rebus: Bergman uses montage to create a game of "rebus," a heraldic riddle (non verbis, sed rebus: "not by words but by things"), to piece together the slogan, "Bris kills the bacteria–no bacteria, no smell."
  • Episode 8, Three-Dimensional: Bergman thought 3-D films were "ridiculously stupid," and in this episode he takes a few playful jabs.
  • Episode 9, The Princess and the Swineherd: In this reinvention of Hans Christian Anderson’s "The Swineherd," a 15-year-old Bibi Andersson, who went on to star in many of Bergman’s greatest films, makes her screen debut as a beautiful princess who promises a swineherd 100 kisses in exchange for a bar of soap. Not a bad deal for the swineherd.

To learn more about Bergman’s soap commercials you can watch a 2009 report by Slate film critic Dana Stevens here. (Note the video requires a flash player.)

Note: This post first appeared on our site in 2011. It’s one of our favorites. So we’re bringing it back.

Related Content:

The Mirrors of Ingmar Bergman, Narrated with the Poetry of Sylvia Plath

Ingmar Bergman Visits The Dick Cavett Show, 1971

Fellini’s Fantastic TV Commercials

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American Horror Story: 7 Seasons of Title Design

American Horror Story: 7 Seasons of Title Design

When American Horror Story premiered in 2011 with its first season, Murder House, audiences could be forgiven for expecting a middle-of-the-road, horror-tinged series after watching creators’ Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk’s pulpy nighttime soap opera Nip/Tuck and their rambunctiously effusive high school musical series Glee. However, from the opening moments of Murder House, it became clear that American Horror Story would keep its predecessors’ must-see TV qualities but warp its lens – and the reality revealed to its audience – to dizzying and terrifying degrees.

Over the course of its seven seasons, American Horror Story has grown into a pillar of prestige television with each season focusing on new themes, stories, and characters and featuring a stable of actors – including Sarah Paulson, Evan Peters, Jessica Lange, Lady Gaga, Cuba Gooding Jr., Angela Bassett and many more – making multiple appearances as multiple characters throughout the series. From its inception, American Horror Story has sought to push the horror genre forward. That desire to create new and contemporary nightmare fuel was cemented when Ryan Murphy and Executive Producer Alexis Martin Woodall approached title designer Kyle Cooper to create a title sequence for the show.

Known for his work on title sequences for Se7en, Mimic, and The Walking Dead, among countless others, Cooper worked with the AHS team to merge the themes, imagery, and even the occasional plot point from the series to tantalize viewers. Each season of American Horror Story presents a different story arc, time period, and cast of characters, as well as a new title sequence designed to bind the anthology series together while laying the season’s thematic groundwork. The series’ title sequences have become so popular that they are often among the first pieces of marketing to be released for a new season, allowing fans and critics alike – if they dare to watch – to mull over potential clues or insights into what horrors they have coming to them. 

A discussion with American Horror Story Executive Producer ALEXIS MARTIN WOODALL and Title Designer KYLE COOPER of Prologue Films.

Alexis, can you give us a bit of background on yourself and your role on the American Horror Story series?

Alexis: I’m the Executive Producer for Ryan Murphy Television and I produce all the shows we do under this banner including American Horror Story, one of my oldest and favourite children. On the show I’m the Creative Producer on the back-end, so of course I deal in prep, I read the scripts, and talk about it with the writers and Ryan…

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